Home
Search results “What is money supply growth rate”
The Money Market- Macroeconomics 4.6
 
03:25
In this video I explain the money market graph with the the demand and supply of money. The graph is used to show the idea of monetary policy and how changing the money supply effects interest rates. Thanks for watching. Please subscribe Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 409990 Jacob Clifford
Money supply: M0, M1, and M2 | The monetary system | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
10:04
In this video, learn about the two measures of money that are part of the money supply - M1 and M2 - as well as the monetary base (which is sometimes called M0). Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/factional-reserve-accounting/v/simple-fractional-reserve-accounting-part-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/fractional-reserve-banking-tut/v/full-reserve-banking?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 359627 Khan Academy
Quantity Theory of Money
 
03:28
The quantity theory of money is an important tool for thinking about issues in macroeconomics. The equation for the quantity theory of money is: M x V = P x Y What do the variables represent? M is fairly straightforward – it’s the money supply in an economy. A typical dollar bill can go on a long journey during the course of a single year. It can be spent in exchange for goods and services numerous times. In the quantity theory of money, how many times an average dollar is exchanged is its velocity, or V. The price level of goods and services in an economy is represented by P. Finally, Y is all of the finished goods and services sold in an economy – aka real GDP. When you multiply P x Y, the result is nominal GDP. Actually, when you multiply M x V (the money supply times the velocity of money), you also get nominal GDP. M x V is equal to P x Y by definition – it’s an identity equation. You can think about the two sides of the equation like this: the left (M x V) covers the actions of consumers while the right (P x Y) covers the actions of producers. Since everything that is sold is bought by someone, these two sides will remain equal. Up next, we’ll use the quantity theory of money to discuss the causes of inflation. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2jvcIbq Next video: http://bit.ly/2k0ZCny
The relationship between a nation's money supply and its inflation rate
 
06:51
Inflation and a country's money supply. For www.inflateyourmind.com Unit 7, by John Bouman. Made with Explain Everything
Views: 4369 John Bouman
Money Growth and Inflation
 
44:46
Video lecture
Views: 22769 ageconjon
Banking 16: Why target rates vs. money supply
 
11:40
The rationale for targeting interest rates instead of directly having a money supply target. More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=yOgGhPIHnlA
Views: 80773 Khan Academy
What gives a dollar bill its value? - Doug Levinson
 
03:52
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-gives-a-dollar-bill-its-value-doug-levinson The value of money is determined by how much (or how little) of it is in circulation. But who makes that decision, and how does their choice affect the economy at large? Doug Levinson takes a trip into the United States Federal Reserve, examining how the people who work there aim to balance the value of the dollar to prevent inflation or deflation. Lesson by Doug Levinson, animation by Qa'ed Mai.
Views: 2115817 TED-Ed
Money and the Money Supply - M0 & M4
 
08:16
Money and the Money Supply - M0 & M4. A video covering Money and the Money Supply - M0 & M4. Narrow and Broad ways of measuring the money supply Instagram @econplsudal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 51466 EconplusDal
Monetary and fiscal policy | Aggregate demand and aggregate supply | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
08:54
Basic mechanics of monetary and fiscal policy Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/monetary-fiscal-policy/v/tax-lever-of-fiscal-policy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/business-cycle-tutorial/v/the-business-cycle?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 698658 Khan Academy
Causes of Inflation
 
06:46
In the last video, we learned the quantity theory of money and its corresponding identity equation: M x V = P x Y For a quick refresher: ‌•M is the money supply. ‌•V is the velocity of money. ‌•P is the price level. ‌•And Y is the real GDP. In this video, we’re rewriting the equation slightly to divide both sides by Y and explore the causes behind inflation. What we discover is that a change in P has three possible causes – changes in M, V, or Y. You probably know that prices can change a lot, even over a short period of time. Y, or real GDP, tends to change rather slowly. Even a seemingly small jump or fall in Y, such as 10% in a year, would signal astonishing economic growth or a great depression. Y probably isn’t our usual culprit for inflation. V, or the velocity of money, also tends to be rather stable for an economy. The average dollar in the United States has a velocity of about 7. That may fall or rise slightly, but not enough to influence prices. That leaves us with M. Changes in the money supply are the driving factor behind inflation. Put simply, when more money chases the same amount of goods and services, prices must rise. Can we put this theory to the test? Let’s look at some real-world examples and see if the quantity theory of money holds up. In Peru in 1990, hyperinflation came into full swing. If we track the growth rate of the money supply to the growth rate of prices, we can see that they align almost perfectly on a graph with both clocking in around 6,000% that year. If we plot the growth rates of the money supply along with the growth rates of prices for a many countries over a long stretch of time, we can see the same relationship. We’ll wrap-up the causes of inflation with three principles to keep in mind as we continue exploring this topic: ‌•Money is neutral in the long run: a doubling of the money supply will eventually mean a doubling of the price level. ‌•“Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomena.” – Milton Friedman ‌•Central banks have significant control over a nation’s money supply and inflation rate. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2jR4yKz Next video: http://bit.ly/2jTTTiW
How Banks Create Money and the Money Multiplier- Macro 4.8
 
04:12
Money doesn't grow on trees, but it does grow in banks. I explain how banks create money and how to use the money multiplier. For more practice go to my website www.ACDCecon.com or watch the unit playlist videos. Please subscribe and leave a comment. You rock! Monetary Policy and Despicable Me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaeIBeJT5hY Video about the Federal Reserve https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXhXnwDANXo Unit playlists. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQkVO2PsxFw
Views: 485145 Jacob Clifford
What's all the Yellen About? Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve: Crash Course Economics #10
 
09:25
This week on Crash Course Economics, we're talking about monetary policy. The reality of the world is that the United States (and most of the world's economies) are, to varying degrees, Keynesian. When things go wrong, economically, the central bank of the country intervenes to try aand get things back on track. In the United States, the Federal Reserve is the organization that steps in to use monetary policy to steer the economy. When the Fed, as it's called, does step in, there are a few different tacks it can take. The Fed can change interest rates, or it can change the money supply. This is pretty interesting stuff, and it's what we're getting into today. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 871162 CrashCourse
Inflation and the Money Supply
 
03:07
How money supply affects Inflation. http://inflationdata.com/Inflation/Inflation_Rate/CurrentInflation.asp As the money supply grows it dilutes the purchasing power of the original currency so each dollar buys less or in other words prices go up or are "inflated". At InflationData we track not only the Government inflation estimates but also inflation information from independent sources like Gallup and the Billion Price Project. We calculate inflation to two decimal places while the government only tracks it to a single decimal place thus our numbers provide a "finer view" and may help to determine turning points quicker. We also present charts of inflation adjusted prices such as Oil, Gasoline, Natural Gas, Electricity, Gold and the NYSE and NASDAQ. By looking at the inflation adjusted prices you can tell how price increases relate to overall price increases due to increases in the money supply i.e. monetary inflation compared to prices increasing due to normal supply and demand issues.
Views: 7890 Tim McMahon
What is EASY MONEY POLICY? What does EASY MONEY POLICY mean? EASY MONEY POLICY meaning
 
01:53
What is EASY MONEY POLICY? What does EASY MONEY POLICY mean? EASY MONEY POLICY meaning - EASY MONEY POLICY definition - EASY MONEY POLICY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ An easy money policy is a monetary policy that increases the money supply usually by lowering interest rates. It occurs when a country's central bank decides to allow new cash flows into the banking system. Since interest rates are lower, it is easier for banks and lenders to loan money, thus leading to increased economic growth. The most immediate effect of easy money, if implemented when the economy is below capacity, may be increased economic growth. In addition, the value of securities rises in the short term. If prolonged, the policy affects the business sentiment of firms and can reverse course over fears of rampant inflation. This is an effect of forward-looking expectations. As a policy, easy money underpins the economic thought of John Maynard Keynes, and has been criticized by advocates of public choice theory and by New Classical economists. A study conducted by S.P. Kothari of the MIT Sloan School of Management, which looked at the growth rate of aggregated fixed investment by American companies between 1952 and 2010 found little evidence to support the notion that lowering short term interest rates stimulates corporate investment. His findings illustrate why reducing the Fed's policy of keeping low interest rates has not had the desired effect.
Views: 378 The Audiopedia
The Money Multiplier
 
06:56
When you deposit money into a bank, do you know what happens to it? It doesn’t simply sit there. Banks are actually allowed to loan out up to 90% of their deposits. For every $10 that you deposit, only $1 is required to stay put. This practice is known as fractional reserve banking. Now, it’s fairly rare for a bank to only have 10% in reserves, and the number fluctuates. Since checkable deposits are part of the U.S. money supplies, fractional reserve banking, as you might have guessed, can have a big impact on these supplies. This is where the money multiplier comes into play. The money multiplier itself is straightforward: it equals 1 divided by the reserve ratio. If reserves are at 10%, the minimum amount required by the Fed, then the money multiplier is 10. So if a bank has $1 million in checkable deposits, it has $10 million to work with for stuff like loans and reserves. Now, typically, the money multiplier is more like 3, because banks can always hold more in reserves than the minimum 10%. When the money multiplier is higher, like during a boom, this gives the Fed more leverage to move M1 and M2 with a small change in reserves. But when the multiplier is lower, such as during a recession, the Fed has less leverage and must push harder to wield its indirect influence over M1 and M2. Next up, we’ll take a closer look at how the Fed controls the money supply and how that has changed since the Great Recession. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/2eHWWtC Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2utp1IH Next video: http://bit.ly/2udpA7U
What is NEUTRALITY OF MONEY? What does NEUTRALITY OF MONEY mean? NEUTRALITY OF MONEY meaning
 
09:08
What is NEUTRALITY OF MONEY? What does NEUTRALITY OF MONEY mean? NEUTRALITY OF MONEY meaning - NEUTRALITY OF MONEY definition - NEUTRALITY OF MONEY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Neutrality of money is the idea that a change in the stock of money affects only nominal variables in the economy such as prices, wages, and exchange rates, with no effect on real variables, like employment, real GDP, and real consumption. Neutrality of money is an important idea in classical economics and is related to the classical dichotomy. It implies that the central bank does not affect the real economy (e.g., the number of jobs, the size of real GDP, the amount of real investment) by printing money. Instead, any increase in the supply of money would be offset by a proportional rise in prices and wages. This assumption underlies some mainstream macroeconomic models (e.g., real business cycle models). Others like monetarism view money as being neutral only in the long-run. When neutrality of money coincides with zero population growth, the economy is said to rest in steady-state equilibrium.:41-43 Superneutrality of money is a stronger property than neutrality of money. It holds that not only is the real economy unaffected by the level of the money supply but also that the rate of money supply growth has no effect on real variables. In this case, nominal wages and prices remain proportional to the nominal money supply not only in response to one-time permanent changes in the nominal money supply but also in response to permanent changes in the growth rate of the nominal money supply. Typically superneutrality is addressed in the context of long-run models. According to Don Patinkin, the concept of monetary neutrality goes back as far as David Hume. The term itself was first used by continental economists beginning at the turn of the 20th century, and exploded as a special topic in the English language economic literature upon Friedrich Hayek's introduction of the term and concept in his famous 1931 LSE lectures published as Prices and Production. Keynes rejected neutrality of money both in the short term and in the long term. Many economists maintain that money neutrality is a good approximation for how the economy behaves over long periods of time but that in the short run monetary-disequilibrium theory applies, such that the nominal money supply would affect output. One argument is that prices and especially wages are sticky (because of menu costs, etc.), and cannot be adjusted immediately to an unexpected change in the money supply. An alternative explanation for real economic effects of money supply changes is not that people cannot change prices but that they do not realize that it is in their interest to do so. The bounded rationality approach suggests that small contractions in the money supply are not taken into account when individuals sell their houses or look for work, and that they will therefore spend longer searching for a completed contract than without the monetary contraction. Furthermore, the floor on nominal wages changes imposed by most companies is observed to be zero: an arbitrary number by the theory of monetary neutrality but a psychological threshold due to money illusion. Neutrality of money has been a central question for monetarism. The most important answers were elaborated within the framework of the Phillips curve. Milton Friedman, assuming adaptive expectations, distinguished a series of short-run Phillips curves and a long-run one, where the short-run curves were supposed to be the conventional, negatively sloped curves, while the long-run curve was actually a vertical line indicating the natural rate of unemployment. According to Friedman, money was not neutral in the short run, because economic agents, confused by the money illusion, always respond to changes in the money supply. If the monetary authority chooses to increase the stock of money and, hence, the price level, agents will be never able to distinguish real and nominal changes, so they will regard the increase in nominal wages as real modifications, so labour supply will also be boosted. However, this change is only temporary, since agents will soon realize the actual state of affairs. As the higher wages were accompanied by higher prices, no real changes in income occurred, that is, it was no need to increase the labour supply. In the end, the economy, after this short detour, will return to the starting point, or in other words, to the natural rate of unemployment.
Views: 6554 The Audiopedia
Economic Growth explained (explainity® explainer video)
 
02:40
The economy is expected to grow steadily. Politics, industry and trade wish for economic growth. But how can economic growth be measured and might the economy eventually fully grown sometime? Our third clip in cooperation with Deutsche Welle explains "Economic Growth". Script download: www.explainity.com/education-project/transskripte/ ------- This explainer video was produced by explainity GmbH Homepage: www.explainity.com E-Mail: [email protected] This explanatory film was produced and published for private, non-commercial use and may be used free of charge in this context for private purposes without consultation or written authorization. Please note, however, that neither the content nor the graphics of this explanatory film may be altered in any way. Please always give explainity as the source when using the film, and if you publish it on the internet, provide a reference to www.explainity.com. For commercial use or use for training purposes, such as projection of the film at training events (e.g. projection of the film as a teaching aid in school or in adult education), a licence is required. Further information on this subject will be found here: https://www.explainity.com/education-project If you are interested in an own explainity explainer video, visit our website www.explainity.com and contact us. We are looking forward to your inquiry.
Views: 123876 explainitychannel
Fiscal & Monetary Policy Review- AP Macroeconomics
 
03:59
In this video I overview fiscal and monetary policy and how the economy adjust in the long run. Keep in mind that fiscal and monetary policy shift aggregate demand while waiting for the economy to adjust is a shift in aggregate supply. Thanks for watching. Please subscribe. If you need more help, check out my Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 591074 Jacob Clifford
Milton Friedman Teaches Monetary Policy
 
09:40
In this cut from our Milton Friedman Speaks series, Dr. Friedman illustrates the basic relationship between the money supply and the consumer price index. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org/ Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net/ Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv/
Views: 44600 Free To Choose Network
Monetary Policy#1: Money multiplier, Fractional Reserve, High Powered v. Narrow v. Broad Money
 
28:18
- So far in the budget and economic survey series 2017 (BES17): we've covered the evolution of money with special focus on digital payment in the light of de-monetization. - Now we shall move to monetary policy- tools, review of last one year's policies and its limitations. - But, first we must learn how can a Central Bank control money supply and liquidity in the system? - In his book the General theory of employment, interest and money, the famous Economist John Maynard Keynes listed the motives for which people demand and keep money in liquid form 1) transaction motive 2) precautionary motive and 3) speculative motive- also known as the asset demand of money. - We measure the money supply thus kept as "M1"- which is currency with public plus demand deposits in the banks. Because of the fractional reserve system, Every “R” reserve generates “1/r” new money - What is money multiplier, why is it said that in a functional economy, money multiplier is always greater than one? - What is M0: reserve money or high powered money? Why is it called liability of RBI? - Measures of money supply: M0, M1, M2, M3, M4. what is broad money and what is narrow money? Which one has the highest liquidity? - How can RBI combat inflation and deflation? What type of policy strategy should it use against these two scenarios? What is easy money policy, cheap money policy, dovish money policy vs. tight money policy, dear money policy, Hawkish money policy. - Faculty Name: You know who - all Powerpoint available at http://mrunal.org/powerpoint - Exam-Utility: UPSC IAS IPS Civil service exam, Prelims, CSAT, Mains, Staff selection SSC-CGL, IBPS-PO/MT, IBPS-CWE, SBI PO & Clerk, RBI and other banking exams; LIC, EPFO, FCI & other PSU exams; CDS, CAPF and other defense services exams; GPSC, MPPCS, RPSC & other State PCS services exams with Indian Economy, Budget, Banking, Public Finance in its syllabus- with descriptive questions and answer writing.
Views: 350181 Mrunal Patel
Money and Finance: Crash Course Economics #11
 
10:36
So, we've been putting off a kind of basic question here. What is money? What is currency? How are the two different. Well, not to give away too much, but money has a few basic functions. It acts as a store of value, a medium of exchange, and as a unit of account. Money isn't just bills and coins. It can be anything that meets these three criteria. In US prisons, apparently, pouches of Mackerel are currency. Yes, mackerel the fish. Paper and coins work as money because they're backed by the government, which is an advantage over mackerel. So, once you've got money, you need finance. We'll talk about borrowing, lending, interest, and stocks and bonds. Also, this episode features a giant zucchini, which Adriene grew in her garden. So that's cool. Special thanks to Dave Hunt for permission to use his PiPhone video. this guy really did make an artisanal smartphone! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eaiNsFhtI8 Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 769285 CrashCourse
Marc Faber money supply growth is concerning-Fast Money 7-2-2007
 
06:16
Marc Faber being told by Eric Bolling to remember that 'the markets are global now.' Marc lives in Thailand and has his office in Hong Kong so I think there is a chance he is aware :-) Jeff Macke calls his style of investing 'catalyst free' however I beg to note that it is also largely 'knee-capping' free as the Federal Reserve has a hard time in the longer term spiking the markets against Marc's favor. Najarian claims Faber in some instances wishes to strip food and energy from the inflation figures. Someone would need to point out to me where Faber is inconstant I do not see it.
Views: 1991 panderingpieholes
What is MONETARY INFLATION? What does MONETARY INFLATION mean? MONETARY INFLATION meaning
 
03:08
What is MONETARY INFLATION? What does MONETARY INFLATION mean? MONETARY INFLATION meaning - MONETARY INFLATION definition - MONETARY INFLATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Monetary inflation is a sustained increase in the money supply of a country (or currency area). Depending on many factors, especially public expectations, the fundamental state and development of the economy, and the transmission mechanism, it is likely to result in price inflation, which is usually just called "inflation", which is a rise in the general level of prices of goods and services. There is general agreement among economists that there is a causal relationship between monetary inflation and price inflation. But there is neither a common view about the exact theoretical mechanisms and relationships, nor about how to accurately measure it. This relationship is also constantly changing, within a larger complex economic system. So there is a great deal of debate on the issues involved, such as how to measure the monetary base and price inflation, how to measure the effect of public expectations, how to judge the effect of financial innovations on the transmission mechanisms, and how much factors like the velocity of money affect the relationship. Thus there are different views on what could be the best targets and tools in monetary policy. However, there is a general consensus on the importance and responsibility of central banks and monetary authorities in setting public expectations of price inflation and in trying to control it. Keynesian economists believe the central bank can sufficiently assess the detailed economic variables and circumstances in real time in order to control monetary policy in detail. These economists favor monetary policies that attempt to even out the ups and downs of business cycles and economic shocks in a precise fashion. Followers of the monetarist school think that Keynesian style monetary policies produce a lot of overshooting, time-lag errors and other unwanted effects, sometimes making things even worse. They doubt the central bank's capacity to analyse economic problems in real time and its ability to influence the economy with correct timing and the right monetary policy measures. So monetarists advocate less intrusive and complex monetary policies, like inflation targeting or a constant growth rate of money supply. Some followers of Austrian School economics advocate either the return to free markets in money, called free banking, or a 100% gold standard and the abolition of central banks. Currently, most central banks follow a monetarist or Keynesian approach, or more often a mix of both. There is a trend of central banks towards the monetarist approach, with inflation targeting.
Views: 745 The Audiopedia
Dynamics of Inflation, Economic Growth, Money Supply and Exchange Rate in India Evidence from Multiv
 
02:16
Dynamics of Inflation, Economic Growth, Money Supply and Exchange Rate in India Evidence from Multivariate Analysis
Views: 34 Research Media
Milton Friedman Speaks: Money and Inflation (B1230) - Full Video
 
01:26:04
Inflation is blamed on many things. But it has only one cause: It is a monetary phenomenon. Inflation occurs when the quantity of money increases faster than the quantity of goods. Why does the money supply increase? Very often, it does so to enable the government to pay its bills without raising taxes. There's only one real cure for inflation. It is a cure that's easy to describe but difficult to apply: The government must reduce spending and print less money. The alternatives are both recession and double-digit inflation. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org/ Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net/ Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv/
Views: 13299 Free To Choose Network
Keynesian economics | Aggregate demand and aggregate supply | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
12:05
Contrasting Keynesian and Classical Thinking Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/keynesian-thinking/v/risks-of-keynesian-thinking?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/monetary-fiscal-policy/v/tax-lever-of-fiscal-policy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 759546 Khan Academy
Equilibrium nominal interest rates in the money market | AP Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
03:59
How are nominal real interest rates determined? In the money market! Learn about the money market in this video. AP(R) Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Macroeconomics is all about how an entire nationÕs performance is determined and improved over time. Learn how factors like unemployment, inflation, interest rates, economic growth and recession are caused and how they affect individuals and society as a whole. We hit the traditional topics from an AP Macroeconomics course, including basic economic concepts, economic indicators, and the business cycle, national income and price determination, the financial sector, the long-run consequences of stabilization policies, and international trade and finance. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/ap-macroeconomics-staging/financial-sector/the-money-market-apmacro?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=APMacro. View more lessons or practice this subject at http://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/ap-macroeconomics/ap-financial-sector/the-money-market-apmacro/v/equilibrium-nominal-interest-rates-in-the-money-market-ap-macroeconomics-khan-academy?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apmacroeconomics AP Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Welcome to Economics! In this lesson we'll define Economic and introduce some of the fundamental tools and perspectives economists use to understand the world around us! Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 6829 Khan Academy
The business cycle | Aggregate demand and aggregate supply | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
11:16
The business cycle and how it may be driven by emotion Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/monetary-fiscal-policy/v/monetary-and-fiscal-policy?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/aggregate-supply-demand-topic/historic-ad-as-scenarios/v/cost-push-inflation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 308777 Khan Academy
What is Monetary Policy? | Definition & Explanation of Monetary Policy
 
38:36
What is Monetary Policy? | Definition & Explanation of Monetary Policy: Monetary policy is the process by which the monetary authority of a country, like the central bank or currency board, controls the supply of money, often targeting an inflation rate or interest rateto ensure price stability and general trust in the currency. Further goals of a monetary policy are usually to contribute to economic growth and stability, to lower unemployment, and to maintain predictable exchange rates with other currencies. Monetary economics provides insight into how to craft an optimal monetary policy. Since the 1970s, monetary policy has generally been formed separately from fiscal policy, which refers to taxation, government spending, and associated borrowing. Monetary policy is referred to as either being expansionary or contractionary. Expansionary policy is when a monetary authority uses its tools to stimulate the economy. An expansionary policy increases the total supply of money in the economy more rapidly than usual. It is traditionally used to try to combat unemployment in a recession by lowering interest rates in the hope that easy credit will entice businesses into expanding. Also, this increases the aggregate demand (the overall demand for all goods and services in an economy), which boosts growth as measured by gross domestic product (GDP). Expansionary monetary policy usually diminishes the value of the currency, thereby decreasing the exchange rate. The opposite of expansionary monetary policy is contractionary monetary policy, which slows the rate of growth in the money supply or even shrinks it. This slows economic growth to prevent inflation. Contractionary monetary policy can lead to increased unemployment and depressed borrowing and spending by consumers and businesses, which can eventually result in an economic recession; it should hence be well managed and conducted with care. ………………………………………………………………………………….. Sources: Text: Text of this video has been taken from Wikipedia, which is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans The Lounge: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/jazz Images: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com
Views: 75 Free Audio Books
How to Reduce Debt and Grow the Economy: Milton Friedman on Budget Reconciliation Legislation (1993)
 
01:02:38
Friedman was best known for reviving interest in the money supply as a determinant of the nominal value of output, that is, the quantity theory of money. Monetarism is the set of views associated with modern quantity theory. Its origins can be traced back to the 16th-century School of Salamanca or even further; however, Friedman's contribution is largely responsible for its modern popularization. He co-authored, with Anna Schwartz, A Monetary History of the United States, 1867–1960 (1963), which was an examination of the role of the money supply and economic activity in the U.S. history. A striking conclusion of their research regarded the way in which money supply fluctuations contribute to economic fluctuations. Several regression studies with David Meiselman during the 1960s suggested the primacy of the money supply over investment and government spending in determining consumption and output. These challenged a prevailing, but largely untested, view on their relative importance. Friedman's empirical research and some theory supported the conclusion that the short-run effect of a change of the money supply was primarily on output but that the longer-run effect was primarily on the price level. Friedman was the main proponent of the monetarist school of economics. He maintained that there is a close and stable association between inflation and the money supply, mainly that inflation could be avoided with proper regulation of the monetary base's growth rate. He famously used the analogy of "dropping money out of a helicopter.",[46] in order to avoid dealing with money injection mechanisms and other factors that would overcomplicate his models. Friedman's arguments were designed to counter the popular concept of Cost-push inflation, that the increased General Price Level at the time was the result of increases in the price of oil, or increases in wages; as he wrote, Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon. — Milton Friedman, 1963.[47] Friedman rejected the use of fiscal policy as a tool of demand management; and he held that the government's role in the guidance of the economy should be restricted severely. Friedman wrote extensively on the Great Depression, which he termed the Great Contraction, arguing that it had been caused by an ordinary financial shock whose duration and seriousness were greatly increased by the subsequent contraction of the money supply caused by the misguided policies of the directors of the Federal Reserve. The Fed was largely responsible for converting what might have been a garden-variety recession, although perhaps a fairly severe one, into a major catastrophe. Instead of using its powers to offset the depression, it presided over a decline in the quantity of money by one-third from 1929 to 1933 ... Far from the depression being a failure of the free-enterprise system, it was a tragic failure of government. — Milton Friedman, Two Lucky People, 233[48] Friedman also argued for the cessation of government intervention in currency markets, thereby spawning an enormous literature on the subject, as well as promoting the practice of freely floating exchange rates. His close friend George Stigler explained, "As is customary in science, he did not win a full victory, in part because research was directed along different lines by the theory of rational expectations, a newer approach developed by Robert Lucas, also at the University of Chicago." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Friedman
Views: 20318 Remember This
[HKDSE ECON] Money supply/money demand 如何影響nominal interest rate?
 
04:03
Vertex Education Econ 教室 Question: With the aid of a diagram, explain how the equilibrium nominal interest rate changes when people desire to save more. Plz like and share and subscribe if it helps =] 翱峰教育 -- 理科商科專家 連續多年TIP中HKDSE題目 命中率極高 學生成績出眾 點解要選擇翱峰教育? 1. TIP題準確,令學生贏在起跑線 2. 緊貼學校進度,你學校學緊乜,我地就教乜,唔洗擔心教非所學 2015 - 2016 常規課程新舊生都可享有高達$200回贈 詳情可瀏覽 https://www.facebook.com/VertexEducation 或致電 2681 0180 查詢
Views: 1828 Vertex Education
How the rich get richer – money in the world economy | DW Documentary
 
42:25
Exploding real estate prices, zero interest rate and a rising stock market – the rich are getting richer. What danger lies in wait for average citizens? For years, the world’s central banks have been pursuing a policy of cheap money. The first and foremost is the ECB (European Central Bank), which buys bad stocks and bonds to save banks, tries to fuel economic growth and props up states that are in debt. But what relieves state budgets to the tune of hundreds of billions annoys savers: interest rates are close to zero. The fiscal policies of the central banks are causing an uncontrolled global deluge of money. Experts are warning of new bubbles. In real estate, for example: it’s not just in German cities that prices are shooting up. In London, a one-bed apartment can easily cost more than a million Euro. More and more money is moving away from the real economy and into the speculative field. Highly complex financial bets are taking place in the global casino - gambling without checks and balances. The winners are set from the start: in Germany and around the world, the rich just get richer. Professor Max Otte says: "This flood of money has caused a dangerous redistribution. Those who have, get more." But with low interest rates, any money in savings accounts just melts away. Those with debts can be happy. But big companies that want to swallow up others are also happy: they can borrow cheap money for their acquisitions. Coupled with the liberalization of the financial markets, money deals have become detached from the real economy. But it’s not just the banks that need a constant source of new, cheap money today. So do states. They need it to keep a grip on their mountains of debt. It’s a kind of snowball system. What happens to our money? Is a new crisis looming? The film 'The Money Deluge' casts a new and surprising light on our money in these times of zero interest rates. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 2306512 DW Documentary
Foreign Exchange Practice- Macro Practice- Macro 5.3
 
03:49
In this video I explain foreign exchange and how the value of currencies change. Remember that the trick is to remember that you supply your currency and the people in other countries demand your currency. Thanks for watching.
Views: 240878 Jacob Clifford
Macroeconomics - Chapter 25: Money, Banks, and the Federal Reserve System
 
51:44
Money is anything that people are generally willing to accept in exchange for goods or services or in payment of debts. Money functions as a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value, and a standard of deferred payment. The Federal Reserve (Fed) is the central bank of the United States. The Fed’s three monetary policy tools are open market operations, discount policy, and reserve requirements. The quantity theory of money provides insight into the long-run relationship between the money supply and inflation. In the long run, inflation results from the money supply growing at a faster rate than real GDP.
Views: 1782 Dr. Bill Schlosser
Nominal interest, real interest, and inflation calculations | AP Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
03:34
The market for loanable funds brings savers and borrowers together. We can also represent the same idea using a mathematical model. In this video, learn about the savings and investment identity. AP(R) Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Macroeconomics is all about how an entire nationÕs performance is determined and improved over time. Learn how factors like unemployment, inflation, interest rates, economic growth and recession are caused and how they affect individuals and society as a whole. We hit the traditional topics from an AP Macroeconomics course, including basic economic concepts, economic indicators, and the business cycle, national income and price determination, the financial sector, the long-run consequences of stabilization policies, and international trade and finance. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy. View more lessons or practice this subject at http://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/ap-macroeconomics/ap-financial-sector/nominal-v-real-interest-rates-ap/v/nominal-interest-real-interest-and-inflation-calculations-ap-macroeconomics-khan-academy2?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=apmacroeconomics AP Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Welcome to Economics! In this lesson we'll define Economic and introduce some of the fundamental tools and perspectives economists use to understand the world around us! Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 20291 Khan Academy
M1 & M2 Money Supply
 
04:13
Views: 36421 Alex Lamon
Interest as rent for money | The monetary system | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
09:54
Thinking about interest as the price of money. Looking at money from a supply and demand perspective Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/interest-price-of-money-tutorial/v/money-supply-and-demand-impacting-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/factional-reserve-accounting/v/simple-fractional-reserve-accounting-part-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 92259 Khan Academy
Inflation and Money Supply
 
09:38
More money is more transactions and more growth in the GDP of a country. All this results in the inflation rate. Inflation is a sustained rate of growth in the price of goods of services. The important indicators for inflation are in CPI - Consumer Price Index PPI - Producer Price Index All this is influenced by the money supply which is an index that tracks the growth of money supply according to the 'printing' of M2 money supply by the central bank. The inflation rate is affected by the reserve requirements, the money supply and the Open Market Operations. In this video, you'll get a break-down of what inflation is, and how you can work with it in order to make better investments and trade decisions.. Thank you for taking the time and effort to learn and grow with me. For more: Principles of trading free course PDF download http://bit.ly/2rOzoGC NERDY MONEY Learn to trade with me FOR FREE and take your trading to the next level in 9 lessons… https://drive.google.com/open?id=1mJuLhfcGLDMR45DXKQgS9twB0tg1-g6S THE ULTIMATE TRADER $25 Learn how to trade! This eBook and audio book will show you how you can make money trading in your free time. This will go over your Mind, Money and Method for you to start earning today! https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=62NBN66YUBDXS MONEY MASTER CURRENCY TRADING COURSE This is a comprehensive guide in your trading that’ll open the doors into your trading with detailed but video lessons for you to learn how to make money in the markets! https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=RSDGHLLKLFL7N KIAZ FREE ALBUM DOWNLOAD – I love music! This is my gift to you. I rap and make music that I love and it’s great to have the opportunity to share it with you. Hit me up if you like this!! http://www.mediafire.com/file/6ce877rallrl8ed/KiaZ_-_KiaZ.zip/file NOTES TO SELF - FREE DOWNLOAD Random notes taken in my phone… A bit of a nerdy habit. http://www.mediafire.com/file/1ae602ubwkdzmci/NOTE_TO_SELF_-_Jerry_KiaZ.pdf/file VANILLA PAGES $7 - Poetry book with my best poems... https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=L6QJQTVXJAEB4 HUSTLE AND MOTIVATE H.A.M $36 - Hustle & Motivate is a book of inspiration and knowledge. Package includes: 1. H.A.M EBook 2. H.A.M Audio recordings 3. 7 Unreleased Private Videos https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=ZTFZL48DBNF5J For alternative payment methods or any other questions contact me: [email protected]
Views: 4 Nerdy Money
Zimbabwe and Hyperinflation: Who Wants to Be a Trillionaire?
 
04:20
How would you like to pay $417.00 per sheet of toilet paper? Sound crazy? It’s not as crazy as you may think. Here’s a story of how this happened in Zimbabwe. Around 2000, Robert Mugabe, the President of Zimbabwe, was in need of cash to bribe his enemies and reward his allies. He had to be clever in his approach, given that Zimbabwe’s economy was doing lousy and his people were starving. Sow what did he do? He tapped the country’s printing presses and printed more money. Clever, right? Not so fast. The increase in money supply didn’t equate to an increase in productivity in the Zimbabwean economy, and there was little new investment to create new goods. So, in effect, you had more money chasing the same goods. In other words, you needed more dollars to buy the same stuff as before. Prices began to rise -- drastically. As prices rose, the government printed more money to buy the same goods as before. And the cycle continued. In fact, it got so out of hand that by 2006, prices were rising by over 1,000% per year! Zimbabweans became millionaires, but a million dollars may have only been enough to buy you one chicken during the hyperinflation crisis. It all came crashing down in 2008 when -- given that the Zimbabwean dollar basically ceased to exist -- Mugabe was forced to legalize transactions in foreign currencies. Hyperinflation isn’t unique to Zimbabwe. It has occurred in other countries such as Yugoslavia, China, and Germany throughout history. In future videos, we’ll take a closer look at inflation and what causes it. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2hNkAFy Next video: http://bit.ly/2j4niXI
Inflation and Bubbles and Tulips: Crash Course Economics #7
 
10:25
In which Adriene and Jacob teach you about how and why prices rise. Sometimes prices rise as a result of inflation, which is a pretty normal thing for economies to do. We'll talk about how across the board prices rise over time, and how economists track inflation. Bubbles are a pretty normal thing for humans to do. One item, like tulips or beanie babies or houses or tech startups experience a rapid rise in prices. This is often accompanied by speculation, a bunch of outrageous profits, and then a nasty crash when the bubble bursts. People get excited about rising prices, and next thing you know, people are trading their life savings for a tulip bulb. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 892416 CrashCourse
Macro 3.3- Long Run Aggregate Supply, Recession, and Inflation (LRAS)
 
03:41
In this video I explain the most important graph in your macroeconomics class. The aggregate demand and supply model. Make sure that you understand the idea of the long run aggregate supply and how to draw a recessionary gap and inflationary gap. Keep in mind that the "long run" is not a specific amount of time. The long run refers to enough time for resource prices (like wages) to adjust when there is a change in price level.Thanks for watching. Please subscribe. If you need more help, check out my Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 572652 Jacob Clifford
Macroeconomic Policy: Fiscal & Monetary Policy 'Quick & Simple' Guide
 
15:43
Macroeconomic Policy: Fiscal & Monetary Policy 'Quick & Simple' Guide Why have any Macroeconomic Policies? 0:47 How can we Classify Macro Policy Directions? 3:46 Fiscal Policy 7:16 Monetary Policy 10:39 ECONOMICS WHY HAVE ANY MACROECONOMIC POLICIES? Business Cycles have occurred for centuries, all the way to the GFC & Great Recession These cycles have caused the boom and busts... and repeating changes in: Aggregate Output, Employment, Prices, and National Income Two main institution aim to minimise the negative impact of business cycles: Governments (Fiscal Policy) Central Banks (Monetary Policy) What are the Goals of Macroeconomic Policy? Extended periods of high, stable, and ever growing, prosperity Shorten periods of recession, and minimise the need for harsh & abrupt adjustments of citizens HOW CAN WE CLASSIFY MACRO POLICY DIRECTIONS Either as Expansionary or Contractionary (or Neutral) Expansionary Encourage economic growth Combat deflation (or disinflation) Boost Employment and National Income i.e. Increase Aggregate Demand in the Economy Contractionary Slow, moderate or stabilise economic growth Combat rising inflation, and its negative impact Moderate Employment Growth (i.e. stabilise wage growth/inflation) i.e. Decrease, or moderate, Aggregate Demand in the Economy NOTE: The goal isn’t to just kill the party! The goal is to attack the risks of inflation (and even possibly hyperinflation), and minimise the chance of an epic bust, e.g. “The bigger the boom, the bigger the bust.” Neutral Don’t ignore neutral policies ...i.e. when policy setters think: Either in a ‘sweet spot’ (or a ‘Goldilocks’ economy), or an uncertain period (i.e.‘Wait and see’ period) Fiscal: This period’s Deficit or Surplus = Last period’s Deficit or Surplus Monetary: Policy Rate = Neutral Rate ...Neutral rate = Real GDP trend growth rate + target inflation rate FISCAL POLICY What are the policy levers? “Taxes and Spending” Taxes (i.e. Revenue) Direct Taxes, on Income and Wealth Indirect Taxes, on Goods and Services Spending (i.e. Expenditure) Transfer Payments, i.e. cash payments to citizens to redistribute wealth Current Spending, i.e. pay for goods & services to fund government and it’s services Capital Spending, i.e. fund infrastructure or other long-term assets to boost productivity FISCAL POLICY Implementing Expansionary Policy Increase Expenditure Decrease Taxes ...or both Impact: Increases Deficit or Reduces Surplus and thus Increased Economic Activity & Aggregate Demand FISCAL POLICY Implementing Contractionary Policy Decrease Expenditure Increase Taxes ...or both Impact: Reduces Deficit or Increases Surplus and thus Decreased Economic Activity or Reduce Aggregate Demand MONETARY POLICY What are the policy levers? “Interest Rates” ...through the Money Supply How are Interest Rates & the Money Supply Altered? Set a Policy Rate: for banks to be charged when borrowing central bank reserves Conduct Open Market Operations: buy and sell government securities for cash Set a Required Reserve Ratio: how much banks need as reserves (and thus can’t lend, affecting the “deposit expansion multiplier”) MONETARY POLICY Implementing Expansionary Policy Increase Money Supply ...and assuming Stable Money Demand Interest Rates will Decrease Impact: Increased Borrowing and thus Increased Economic Activity & Aggregate Demand MONETARY POLICY Implementing Expansionary Policy Decrease Policy Rate: Encourages banks to borrow central bank reserves, and on lend Buy Securities in Open Market Operations: Transfer cash (i.e. from buying) from the central bank to the banks, which they can then on lend Reduce the Required Reserve Ratio: Reduces the level of reserves needed to be held by banks.These (new) excess reserves can be on lent MONETARY POLICY Implementing Contractionary Policy Decrease Money Supply ...and assuming Stable Money Demand Interest Rates will Increase Impact: Decreased Borrowing and thus Decreased Economic Activity and Reduce Economic Demand MONETARY POLICY Implementing Contractionary Policy The Exact Opposite to earlier.... Increase Policy Rate Sell Securities in Open Market Operations Increase the Required Reserve Ratio ---------- Thumbnail Portrait: Photo by Ravi K from Pexels ----------- This video was brought to you by AccoFina. Subscribe to the Channel: https://goo.gl/84Sfeg Or just check out the Channel Page: https://goo.gl/yTj9Bs Here’s AccoFina’s Most Popular YouTube Video: https://goo.gl/Jbv685 And here’s AccoFina’s Latest YouTube Upload: https://goo.gl/wDM83Y AccoFina Website, Products and Social Networking: 1) Website (inc. Free Spreadsheets, Books & Calculators) http://www.accofina.com 2) Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/axeltracy 3) Udemy Instructor Page https://www.udemy.com/u/axeltracy/ 4) Twitter http://www.twitter.com/accofina 5) Google+ http://plus.google.com/+accofina #Economics #FinancialEducation #EconomicsForBeginners
Views: 575 AccoFina
Monetary Growth 1/4
 
09:48
There is a part in the monetary system that does not comply with sustainability. Idea & graphs: Helmut Creutz
Views: 7857 Money Syndrome
Economic growth, GDP and the demand for money
 
02:12
Demand for money
Views: 1175 lostmy1
The process of money supply (1)
 
12:36
The lecture is about the basic process of the money supply. Further inquiries can be sent to [email protected]
Macro Unit 2.1- GDP and Economic Growth
 
03:38
In this short video I explain GDP, the components of GDP, and what is not included in the Gross Domestic Product. Thanks for watching, please subscribe If you need more help, check out my Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji
Views: 422416 Jacob Clifford
Macro Problem - Numerical Example with Money Demand and Supply - Find Equilibrium Interest Rate
 
07:33
In this practice problem, we're given a money demand equation, money supply and the price level, and we're asked to find the interest rates that equilibrates the money market (the market for real money balances). We thus start to get a hint at how central banks might influence interest rates (and the rest of the economy) by changing the money supply. This work eventually leads up to the calculating the LM Curve. More Macroeconomics questions: https://sites.google.com/site/curtiskephart/ta/intermediate-macro-solutions ________________________________________________________________ Suppose the money demand function is (M/P)^d=1000-100r where r is the interest rate in percent. The money supply M is 1000 and the price level P is 2. 0:55 a. Graph the supply and demand for real money balances. 3:10 b. What is the equilibrium interest rate? 4:10 c. Assume that the price level is fixed. What happens to the equilibrium interest rate if the supply of money is raised from 1000 to 1200? 5:25 d. If the Fed wishes to raise the interest rate to 7 percent, what money supply should it set? From Mankiw's Macroeconomics - Chapter 11 (Aggregate Demand Part 1) 8th edition. ________________________________________
Views: 17398 economicurtis
U.S. Economic Outlook and Implications for Monetary Policy
 
01:15:22
U.S. Economic Outlook and Implications for Monetary Policy https://www.japansociety.org/event/us-economic-outlook-and-implications-for-monetary-policy After a period of steady growth, signs of pressure are beginning to emerge in the global economy. In the United States, the Federal Reserve, buoyed by a steadily strengthening economy, raised interest rates four times last year. Still, with the return of volatility and growth of economic and geopolitical risks, the path forward is unclear. In this program, former Fed Vice Chair Donald Kohn and former U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew discuss current economic trends, U.S. monetary policy, and its impact on the U.S. economy. Speakers: Donald Kohn, Robert V. Roosa Chair in International Economics & Senior Fellow in Economic Studies, Brookings Institution; former Vice Chair, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System Jacob J. Lew, Visiting Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University; Partner, Lindsay Goldberg LLC; former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Moderator: Gerard Baker, Editor At Large, The Wall Street Journal ------ Visit: http://www.japansociety.org/page/calendar Like: https://www.facebook.com/japansociety Follow: https://twitter.com/japansociety Watch: http://www.youtube.com/user/JapanSocietyNYC Join: http://www.japansociety.org/page/support Teach: http://aboutjapan.japansociety.org/
Views: 319 JapanSocietyNYC
ECONOMY FOR PRELIMS LECTURE 4 | MONEY SUPPLY M1 M2 M3, MONEY MULTIPLIER, LIQUIDITY | UPSC 2018 NCERT
 
22:40
MONEY SUPPLY - M1 M2 M3 M0 NARROW MONEY, BROAD MONEY LIQUIDITY BEST ECONOMICS NCERT FOR PRELIMS UPSC CSE Introduction on UPSC CSE Economics For Prelims & Mains. #Economics is a very important from the UPSC exam point of view. It is very crucial not just for CSE Prelims but for CSE Mains and interview as well. #UPSC #ECONOMICS #PRELIMS2018 #ECONOMY #MRUNAL MRUNAL ECONOMY 2018 INDIAN ECONOMY UNACADEMY ECONOMY mrunal gdp mrunal sir mrunal economics 2018 mrunal best mrunal ias mrunal spipa
Views: 18187 STUDY IAS