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EPABX System Installation | Telephone Exchange by Tech Guru Manjit
 
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EPABX System Installation | Telephone Exchange by Tech Guru Manjit In various Topics we are uploading videos on various topics like technical, motivational, travel guide etc. Request all our Subscriber & non Subscriber to see like and share our videos & if you have any idea or you need any other informational video us to make please drop us a mail at [email protected] Regards Tech Guru Manjit
Views: 30430 Tech Guru Manjit
Introduction to Telephone Systems
 
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Follow Eli on the Vlog Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/EliComputerGuyLive Info Level: Beginner Presenter: Eli the Computer Guy Date Created: August 2, 2010 Length of Class: 54 Minutes Tracks Telephone Systems Prerequisites None Purpose of Class This class introduces students to the basic components of telephone systems. Topics Covered Public Switched Telephone Network Central Offices Trunk Lines PBX and Voicemail Systems PBX Stations Voicemail Subcribers Class Notes Introduction Telephone systems are not complicated if you understand how they work. A Word on VoIP VoIP is not a telephone system PSTN PSTN -- Public Switched Telephone Network is like the Internet, but for telephone communication NADP -- North American Dialing Plan -- Is the system for routing telephone calls. Central Office -- All telephone lines connect to a local central office Trunk Lines Every Trunk Line has a telephone number A Trunk Line allows for 1 incoming or outgoing call. You can have far more telephones in a building then you have trunk lines. Incoming Trunk lines are setup in Hunt Groups. If the main phone number is busy the call is automatically forwarded to the next number in the Hunt Group Incoming Hunt Groups are setup by your local telephone company. Outgoing calls can be routed to use selected trunk lines. This in configured in your PBX. PBX and Voicemail The PBX routes telephone calls The Voicemail system provides all audio messaging. (Voicemail boxes, Message Boards, and Auto Attendant Messages) Stations All devices that connect to the PBX are "Stations". This includes telephones, call boxes, intercom systems, etc. There are 2 types of stations; Analogue and Digital. Analogue and Digital stations have to be connected to appropriate ports on the PBX. An analogue phone cannot connect to a digital port and vice versa. Almost all fax machines and phones you buy at retail stores are analogue. If your new fax machine does not work it may be because it's plugged into a digital line. Subscribers Subscribers are users of the Voicemail system. Subscribers do not have to have stations Voicemail ports are the number of connections to the Voicemail system at any one time. This includes not just people retrieving their voicemail, but also incoming calls that connect to Auto Attendant messages. Final Thoughts Be careful before you touch! Most older telephone and voicemail systems were administered using a phone keypad, NOT and computer interface. If you mess something up it can be very difficult to rebuild a deleted Auto Attendant or such. Resources North American Numbering Plan PSTN -- Wikipedia
Views: 646260 Eli the Computer Guy
The Making of Information Age: Enfield Telephone Exchange
 
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This film explores the story of the Enfield telephone exchange and the role of female operators in the development of telephone networks. The Enfield exchange was one of the last to be converted from manual to automatic switching. After closure, the Science Museum preserved a section of the switchboard which is now on display in the new Information Age gallery along with stories of the women who worked on the exchange. Information Age tells the story of how our lives have been transformed by information and communication technologies over the last 200 years. Visit http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/informationage or follow the conversation online via #smInfoAge to find out more.
Views: 31722 Science Museum
The Telephone Exchange (1982) British Telecom Schools Film
 
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A Pacesetter production for British Telecom. BFI Database: The invention of the automatic telephone exchange system by Strowger and the history of its development. Looks in detail at various automatic systems and explains how they work, these include: the Strowger switching system; the cross bar selector; the reed relay electronic exchange; and the microchip technology of the System X exchange. Intended for schoolchildren aged 10-16 years. This is a new transfer of an severely faded 16mm print. Some colour correction has been applied to try and reduce the red cast. The copyright in this film belongs to BT Group.
Views: 50873 ephemeralfilm
PBX Private Branch Exchange Telephone Systems: "Invisible Diplomats" 1965 AT&T; Audrey Meadows
 
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more at http://phones.quickfound.net AT&T high-end business marketing film for PBX (Private Branch eXchange) switchboards. The film stars Audrey Meadows & Ruta Lee, the cinematographer was Hal Mohr (A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Phantom of the Opera, Rancho Notorious...). Two different kinds are shown: Audrey Meadows' PBX is a more traditional cord switchboard. The operator answers and connects calls by plugging cords into jacks. Ruta Lee's PBX is the latest (in 1965) cordless switchboard. Calls are processed by pressing a sequence of buttons, instead of using cords and jacks. Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_telephone_system#Private_branch_exchange A private branch exchange (PBX) is a telephone exchange or switching system that serves a private organization and performs concentration of central office lines or trunks and provides intercommunication between a large number of telephone stations in the organization. The central office lines provide connections to the public switched telephone network and the concentration aspect of a PBX permits the shared use of these lines between all stations in the organization. The intercommunication aspect allows two or more stations to establish telephone or conferencing calls between them without using the central office equipment. Each PBX-connected station, such as a telephone set, a fax machine, or a computer modem, is often referred to as an extension and has a designated extension telephone number that may or may not be mapped automatically to the numbering plan of the central office and the telephone number block allocated to the PBX. Initially, the primary advantage of a PBX was the cost savings for internal phone calls: handling the circuit switching locally reduced charges for telephone service via the central office lines. As PBX systems gained popularity, they were equipped with services that were not available in the public network, such as hunt groups, call forwarding, and extension dialing. In the 1960s a simulated PBX known as Centrex provided similar features from the central telephone exchange. A PBX is differentiated from a key telephone system (KTS) in that users of a key system manually select their own outgoing lines on special telephone sets that control buttons for this purpose, while PBXs select the outgoing line automatically or, formerly, by an operator. The telephone sets connected to a PBX do not normally have special keys for central office line control, but it is not uncommon for key systems to be connected to a PBX to extend its services. A PBX, in contrast to a key system, employs an organizational numbering plan for its stations. In addition, a dial plan determines whether additional digit sequences must be prefixed when dialing to obtain access to a central office trunk. Modern number analysis systems permit users to dial internal and external telephone numbers without special codes to distinguish the intended destination. History The term PBX was first applied when switchboard operators managed company switchboards manually using cord circuits. As automated electromechanical switches and later electronic switching systems gradually replaced the manual systems, the terms private automatic branch exchange (PABX) and private manual branch exchange (PMBX) were used to differentiate them. Solid state digital systems were sometimes referred to as electronic private automatic branch exchanges (EPABX). Today, the term PBX is by far the most widely recognized. The acronym is now applied to all types of complex, in-house telephony switching systems. Two significant developments during the 1990s led to new types of PBX systems. One was the massive growth of data networks and increased public understanding of packet switching. Companies needed packet switched networks for data, so using them for telephone calls was tempting, and the availability of the Internet as a global delivery system made packet switched communications even more attractive. These factors led to the development of the voice over IP PBX, or IP-PBX. The other trend was the idea of focusing on core competence. PBX services had always been hard to arrange for smaller companies, and many companies realized that handling their own telephony was not their core competence. These considerations gave rise to the concept of the hosted PBX...
Views: 26318 Jeff Quitney
Telephone Exchange PBX (two way)
 
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(EN) The PBX system allows you to make phone calls between two telephones. Initiate a phone call occurs when a telephone receiver is high; the call is completed when both phones are closed. (RO) Aceasta centrala telefonica permite efectuarea de convorbiri telefonice intre doua posturi telefonice. Iniţierea unui apel telefonic are loc atunci când un telefon are receptorul ridicat; convorbirea se încheie atunci când ambele telefoane sunt închise.
Views: 27513 Iulian Magirescu
Telephone Electronics: "Basic Telephony" 1961 US Army Training Film TF11-3116
 
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Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://phones.quickfound.net/ "ELECTRO-MAGNETIC THEORY AS APPLIED TO TELEPHONY; COMPONENTS, OPERATION AND TRANSMISSION RANGE OF SOUND POWERED, LOCAL BATTERY, AND COMMON BATTERY TELEPHONIC SYSTEM." US Army Training Film TF11-3116 Originally a public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephony Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ In telecommunications, telephony encompasses the general use of equipment to provide communication over distances, specifically by connecting telephones to each other. The technology is associated with the electronic transmission of voice, fax, or other information between distant parties using systems historically associated with the telephone, a hand-held device containing both a speaker or transmitter and a receiver. It is commonly referred to as the construction or operation of telephones or telephonic systems and as a system of telecommunications in which telephonic equipment is employed in the transmission of speech or other sound between points, with or without the use of wires.. To break the term down into further detail, telephony is the science of translating sound into electrical signals, transmitting them, and then converting them back to sound; that is, the science of telephones. The term is used frequently to refer to computer hardware and software that performs functions traditionally performed by telephone equipment. For example, telephony software can combine with your modem to turn your computer into a sophisticated answering service. A popular example of this type of telephony software is voice mail... Brief overview Telephones were originally connected directly together in pairs. Each user would have a separate telephone wired to various places he might wish to reach. This became inconvenient when people wanted to communicate with many other people using telephones, so the telephone exchange was invented. Each telephone could then be connected to other local ones, thus inventing the local loop and the telephone call. Soon, nearby exchanges were connected by trunk lines, and eventually distant ones were as well. In modern times, most telephones are plugged into telephone jacks. The jacks are connected by inside wiring to a drop wire which connects the building to a cable. Cables usually bring a large number of drop wires from all over a district access network to one wire center or telephone exchange. When the user of a telephone wants to make a telephone call, equipment at the exchange examines the dialed telephone number and connects that telephone line to another in the same wire center, or to a trunk to a distant exchange. Most of the exchanges in the world are connected to each other, forming the public switched telephone network (PSTN). By the end of the 20th century almost all were stored program control exchanges. After the middle of the 20th century, fax and data became important secondary users of the network created to carry voices, and late in the century, parts of the network were upgraded with ISDN and DSL to improve handling of such traffic. Today, telephony has been digitized and has merged into digital telephony,.. Another important concept that has been merged into telephony is computer telephony integration, which enables computers to know about and control phone functions such as making and receiving voice, fax, and data calls with telephone directory services and caller identification...
Views: 11097 Jeff Quitney
T 4.3  Telephone exchanges -- Manual, Strowger, Cross Bar and Stored Program SPC
 
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A complete video lecture course with anaimations on telecom technology
AT&T Archives: The Step-By-Step Switch
 
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See more from the AT&T Archives at http://techchannel.att.com/archives The purpose of this film was to show employees, back in 1951, how calls were automatically switched through an SxS office. This film gives a general appreciation of the importance, complexity, and cost of switching equipment in an average 1950s telephone office. The path of a call is illustrated as it runs through a demonstration unit. "Careful adherance to Bell System maintenance practices" is stressed. While this is only part I, Part II eventually showed the equipment in various types of use, and Part II showed the internal circuit operations. Switchers today are digital and look drastically different. These systems at this time were still not even transistorized, so this film shows a system that's not only years back in time, but many generations back in terms of technology. Producer: Audio Productions, Inc. Footage courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 212536 AT&T Tech Channel
Crossbar switching system - Telephone
 
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From the Museum of Communications, this is a quick video of me standing in one of the aisles of the crossbar frames. I don't know which model this was, but I'll update the video when I figure it out. The system is constantly dialing via an auto-dialer one aisle over.
Views: 18952 VeeDubTDI
Automatic telephone exchange - operating
 
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A step-by-step automatic telephone exchange brought into operation in 1921 at a post office in Ljubljana, which was the first automatic exchange in the then Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later Yugoslavia). Originally it connected 500 users, but the facilities were later upgraded. Before being donated to the Museum of Post & Telecommunications in 1981, it had a total of 2000 subscribers. Two automatic telephones are connected to the exchange; the first is a Siemens & Halske and the other Telefongyar R. T. Budapest.
Views: 27192 Sounds of Changes
Manual telephone exchange
 
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Manual desktop telephone exchange with wooden casing, a dial and a Bakelite handset. Manual exchanges were in use from the second half of the 19th century. In Slovenia, the last manual telephone exchange with eight connections ceased operating in September 1987. Two magneto telephones are connected to the exchange. The exchange is part of the collection of Museum of Post & Telecommunications.
Views: 4033 Sounds of Changes
AT&T Archives: What is the Bell System?
 
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For more from the AT&T Archives, see http://techchannel.att.com/showpage.cfm?ATT-Archives The Bell System, which in 1976 employed nearly one million people at 27,000 locations worldwide, always benefited from explaining its scope to the public. This explanation is from a blue-collar POV, from a 'telephone man'. He divides the Bell businesses into 5 segments, and explains what each of them do. It's faux-folksy, but it does the job. Here are the company segments: 1. AT&T 2. Large local telephone companies (23 of them, like Mountain Bell, Pacific Bell, 3. Ohio Bell, etc) 4. Long Lines 5. Bell Laboratories 6. Western Electric Most people at the time knew of the Bell system as who rented you your phone, serviced the lines and provided basic and long distance telephone service. But the company extended far beyond that into military support operations, a number of much smaller subcompanies, and international telephony infrastructure projects. Footage courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 42475 AT&T Tech Channel
How an IP PBX works and its Benefits
 
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This presentation shows how an IP PBX works and what its main benefits are
Views: 237518 3cxvoip
What is PABX, the High Quality Tutorial that you Must See about Private Automated Branch eXchange
 
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The PABX allows and controls the sharing of different phone lines between different communication devices. Open this page: http://www.ozekiphone.hu/what-is-pabx-private-automated-branch-exchange-311.html PABX (Private Automated Branch eXchange) controls the switching of different communication channels among different communication devices. The channel between the devices are built up by Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). PABX is used by call centers in particular. This system provides single access to multiple lines.
Views: 50099 Joseph Richardson
Panasonic PABX TA308 simplified DIY installation
 
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Panasonic PABX TA308 simplified installation
Views: 247959 Scott Layton
How to STAR WIRE up to 24 telephone extensions from one connection box
 
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Hi, this 'How To' video shows a neat way to connect up to 24 telephone extensions into one junction box (box conn 201). It is perfect if you have a refurbished property or a new build and you have run all the telephone cables back to one point. This box connection 201 will allow you to star wire all the extension from one point by adapting the box using jumper wires as shown in the video. Many thanks Vince To visit my ebay shop please click this link http://www.mrtelephone.co.uk
Views: 46093 My Mate VINCE
AT&T Archives: Switchboards, Old and New (Bonus Edition)
 
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See more from the AT&T Archives at http://techchannel.att.com/archives Introduction by George Kupczak of the AT&T Archives and History Center Switchboards, Old and New traces the development of voice switching methods from the first system that utilized the wires of a burglar alarm unit in Boston in 1877, to the "latest type" of switching in central offices, circa 1932. Along the way, we get the evolution of the Operator as well. Originally teenage boys were hired as operators, but it was quickly noted that they were not ideal due to being rambunctious and prone to pranks. Emma and her sister Stella Nutt were the first female operators, hired in 1878. They started a tradition that continued to the 1970s, when equal hiring practices made it possible for men to become operators as well, again. Switchboards started to be replaced by TSPS (Traffic Service Position System), starting in 1969. Voicemail trees, also called Interactive Voice Response, also replaced operators. In 2000, there were fewer than 300,000 operators working in the U.S., most at the switchboards of large companies or hotels. That number continues to drop by the thousands every year. Produced by Loucks and Norling Studios Footage courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 76457 AT&T Tech Channel
Multi-line Phone System Tutorial
 
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A basic overview of multi-line phone systems and how to perform simple functions such as putting callers on hold, transferring calls, conferencing calls, paging, accessing voicemail and recording greetings.
Views: 157746 learn4lifewithmrsb
illegal telephone exchange India TERM CELL DOT - CBI
 
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ILLEGAL VOIP ILD TELEPHONE EXCHANGE IN GURGAON INDIA. THE RAID IE BEING CARRIED OUT BY THE TERM CELL DELHI AND CBI DELHI.
Views: 37982 harish kumar
How to Set-up an Enterprise Asterisk-based PBX in 10 Minutes (including coffee break)
 
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http://www.xorcom.com - In this video we demonstrate how fast and easy it is to set up an enterprise level Asterisk-based PBX system. In just ten minutes a technician connects a system supporting four PRI lines and 96 FXS analog extensions, complete with analog and IP video phones! The secret to the configuration speed and simplicity is the fact that Xorcom's XPP USB2 drivers are embedded in all standard Asterisk distributions. These drivers enable the PBX to automatically detect the telephony ports. See for yourself!
The Final Step by Step telephone switch in Southwestern Bell
 
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Southwestern Bell Telephone's last analog to digital switch transition cable cut. 1996
Views: 3555 Daryl Maxwell
The Traveling Telephone Switching Machine - AT&T Archives
 
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See more from the AT&T Archives at http://techchannel.att.com/archives The #5A Crossbar switcher, built by Western Electric at the Columbus Works, was a telephone switching machine that could handle either around 1000 lines, or up to 2000 with an extension upgrade. This made it ideal for smaller towns and communities, new large subdivisions, and larger companies. The crossbar switch itself took up 10 by 42 feet, and weighed 25 tons. The machine was pre-assembled in Ohio, and then trucked to its final installation site. This film shows the assembly and transportation, and further details about the crossbar switch's "plug and play" type of capabilities. The Columbus Works were one of the Bell System's later plants, built specifically for switching equipment manufacture, and opened in the late 1950s. It eventually manufactured not just the crossbar switch but also the 4ESS digital switch. The last major manufacturing effort AT&T ran at the plant was its Airloop, which was a wireless system announced in 1995 that was a potential replacement for crossbar-type switching systems in hard-to-reach areas. It could bring quantities of new lines to the network wirelessly, without having to build in new trunk lines to a site. At its peak, the Columbus Works employed around 12,000 workers, including 1,000 Bell Labs employees alone. In 1996 it became part of Lucent Technologies, which sold the plant in 2003. Today, the office building on the site is still occupied, but much of the manufacturing plant is empty. Writer/director: Dick Martin Music: Steve Covello Footage Courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 28004 AT&T Tech Channel
Small Business Telephone System | How To Install
 
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http://ModernBusinessPhoneSystem.com Installing your small office telephone system. You can do it yourself with the right tools and knowledge. However, you may just want to contract it out and leave it to technicians that deal with the situations every day. Either way, the C-Plus model business communications system from ESI shown here is a great value and very user friendly.
Views: 217524 VirtualCommLLC
Speedy Cutover Service, SXS switching cutover to ESS filmed live at Glendale CA central office, 1984
 
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A brief but surprisingly exciting 1984 video showing the preparation and live, real-time cutover from Step By Step switching system (SXS) to a new electronic switching system (ESS) in Glendale, California. Western Electric offered the Speedy Cutover Service to switching offices throughout the Bell System. Western Electric installers would visit a facility and prepare it, installing the new equipment inside the facility. They would identify and mark the existing cables that would need to be cut, then prepare employees for the cutover to the new ESS system. Previously a cutover from step-by-step (or from crossbar service) to ESS would take many frantic minutes, upwards of an hour, during which time active telephone service would be lost mid-call. With the speedy cutover service – 51 installers simultaneously cutting 927 cables as fast as possible, all on cue – the interrupted service could be brought down to well under a single minute. The climax here is unquestionably the moment of truth, the cutting of the cables, which is shown in real time. After making sure no emergency calls are underway, and with a shout of "Let's cut it!" the race is on, with three camera set-ups and a disco score capturing and preserving the moment of truth. Footage Courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 35618 AT&T Tech Channel
Telephone System Call Routing
 
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Info Level: Beginner Presenter: Eli the Computer Guy Date Created: August 8, 2010 Length of Class: 60 Minutes Tracks Telephone Systems Prerequisites Introduction to Telephone Systems Purpose of Class This class discusses how calls get routed within a telephone system PBX. Topics Covered Extensions Call Paths Out Calling Incoming Trunk Groups Auto Attendants Hunt Groups Call Groups Out Going Call Routing Class Notes Introduction All telephone systems use the same basic concepts to route calls Extensions PBX's relate to everything as an extension. A station is an extension. An Auto Attendant is an extension, etc. You should create a range of extensions for use for stations and subscribers, and a different range of extensions to be used for administrative purposes (Auto Attendants, Hunt Groups, etc) You can determine how many numbers make up an extension (2,3,4) Call Paths Call paths determine how an incoming call is routed. A standard call path states that a station is rung 3 times, and then the call is routed to voicemail. You can have call paths with 20+ steps. Out Calling Out calling allows the PBX to route calls from the outside to outside lines. A call from the outside can be routed to a cell phone. Out calling requires 2 trunk lines (1 for the incoming call, and one for the outgoing call) Out calling can be a HUGE security problem if not administered properly. Incoming Trunks Incoming trunk lines are programmed into Trunk Groups. Individual Trunk Groups are pointed at a specific extension for incoming calls (Usually an Auto Attendant) Multiple businesses in the same building can use the same PBX by putting their phone lines into Trunk Groups and then pointing the Trunk Group to their Auto Attendant. Auto Attendants "If you would like Sales press 1" The message for the Auto Attendant resides on the Voicemail System. You create an Extension, make it an Auto Attendant, point the message to a Voicemail box, determine what will happen when users press number keys, determine what happens if the user does nothing. Hunt Groups Are Extensions that when called ring a series of other extensions in order. If the first extension in the hunt Group is busy, the next extension in the Hunt Group is rung. Weighted or Smart Hunt Groups can route calls to extensions based on programmed parameters. Call Groups Call Groups are Extensions where numerous Extensions are rung at the same time when the Extension is dialed. Outgoing Call Routing You can create Outgoing Trunk Groups based on whether the trunk lines have local, long distance, or international calling privileges. You can create codes to allow managers to be able to access any Outgoing Trunk Group. Outgoing Call Routing is based on the number of digits dialed, and whether those digits match a pattern that allows the call to be routed to a specific Outgoing Trunk Group.
Views: 151512 Eli the Computer Guy
V1: Fundamentals of Telecom 1 - Introduction and Preview
 
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Teracom DVD Video Course V1 Fundamentals of Telecom 1 The PSTN • Telephony • The Telecom Industry • Telecom Equipment Length 142 minutes. 55-page student manual. ISBN 1-894887-26-3 Teracom Training Institute http://www.teracomtraining.com/video_courses.htm It all starts with the PSTN and POTS. We'll begin with the basics of telephony: loops, trunks, circuits, analog, the voiceband... fundamentals that are key to understanding newer technologies and services. Then, we'll review switches, PBXs, Centrex and ancillary equipment like ACDs and IVRs. With this framework in place, we'll explore the telecommunications industry, understanding the main players and competitors, how LECs connect to IXCs, the switching hierarchy and how CLECs fit into the picture. The topics in this course - how the telephone system and industry work, provide the essential foundation on which everything else, including digital communications, data circuits and networking are built. Course outline - V1: Fundamentals of Telecom 1 Length 142 minutes. DVD-R NTSC format. 55-page 8.5" x 11" softcover bound workbook. Part 1 Fundamentals of Telephony 1.03 The Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) 1.05 Analog Circuits 1.07 What is Sound? 1.09 The Voiceband 1.11 Plain Ordinary Telephone Service (POTS) 1.13 DTMF Address Signaling 1.15 Signaling System 7 (SS7) Part 2 Telecom Equipment 2.03 Telephone Switches 2.05 PBX vs. Centrex 2.07 Voice VPNs 2.09 Call Centers Part 3 The Telecommunications Industry 3.03 US Domestic Telcos 3.05 AT&T and Verizon 3.07 Canadian Telephone Companies 3.09 PSTN Switching Centers Before Competition 3.11 Accessing The Interexchange Carriers 3.13 Competitive Local Exchange Carriers (CLECs) Appendix A Acronyms and Abbreviations Teracom's self-paced DVD-video courses: ideal for learning about telecom, datacom, networking, IP, MPLS, Voice over IP and wireless outside of structured seminars. Each course comes with an approx. 2-hour full-color multimedia DVD-video, a comprehensive workbook/textbook with copies of all graphics and detailed reference notes that are sure to be a valuable reference for years to come; plus a knowledge evaluation exercise and personalized course completion certificate suitable for framing. Related video: Videotutorial V1 "Loops" is a free sample, from Lesson 1.03 of this DVD.
Phone Companies: The Independent 1957 US Independent Telephone Association
 
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more at http://phones.quickfound.net As a small town independent telephone company changes over to a new automatic switching system, the workings of independent phone companies are explained. Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independent_telephone_company An independent telephone company was a telephone company providing local service in the United States or Canada that was not part of the Bell System organized by American Telephone and Telegraph. Independent telephone companies usually operated in many rural or sparsely populated areas. The second fundamental Bell patent for telephones expired on 30 January 1894, which provided an opportunity for independent companies to provide telephone services, although some had been established before that date. The Strowger Automatic Telephone Exchange company had been formed on 30 October 1891. The first Strowger switch went into operation on 3 November 1892 in LaPorte, Indiana, with 75 subscribers and capacity for 99. Independent manufacturing companies were established, such as Stromberg-Carlson in 1894 and Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Company in 1897. By 1903 while the Bell system had 1,278,000 subscribers on 1514 main exchanges, the independents, excluding non-profit rural cooperatives, claimed about 2 million subscribers on 6150 exchanges. The size ranged from the small mom and pop companies run by a husband and wife team, with the husband doing the outside lines work and the wife operating a manual switchboard. Later these small companies would have a Class 5 telephone switch providing local automatic service. Much of this equipment was manufactured by the Automatic Electric Company, Stromberg-Carlson, and the Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Company. Large independent companies, such as GTE, Theodore Gary & Company, United Telecom, ConTel and Centel resembled the Bell system with vertical integration. GTE was the largest non-RBOC domestic telephone company, and included local operating companies, long line (toll) companies and manufacturing companies. From 1949 the Rural Electrification Authority (REA), now the Rural Utilities Service, could provide assistance to telephone co-operatives to extend telephone service in rural areas. The voice of the smaller independents were the two magazines, Telephony and Telephone Engineer and Management (TE&M), both from Chicago. The United States Independent Telephone Association (USITA), their trade association, became the United States Telecom Association. Bryant Pond in Woodstock, Maine was known as having the last manual magneto (hand-crank) telephone exchange in America. The family-owned Bryant Pond Telephone Company was operated from a two-position magneto switchboard in the living room of owners Barbara and Elden Hathaway. In 1981 the company was purchased by the Oxford County Telephone & Telegraph Company, a nearby larger independent company, and automatic service was provided in 1983. In Canada, Bell Canada has a dominant position as a local service provider, particularly east of Manitoba and in the Northern territories, and many of the independent telephone companies are in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec.
Views: 3342 Jeff Quitney
Dial-Select Telephone Intercom System w4p300 #301
 
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Schematic is now available. To get it, send me an email: intercom4u at yahoo dot com and request the Dial-Select Intercom schematic #301. Want something already built? See W4P300 #304 Intercom using a PABX. Up to 8 stations on one talk circuit. 8870 IC decodes DTMF (Touch-Tone) to binary signal, 74HC237 turns this into 8 individual signals to operate one of eight relays that reverse the polarity of the line going to the selected station which operates the signaling device. Similar to a Melco intercom except that it uses the same pair for talk and signaling.
Views: 66933 Wired Up
ESS: Electronic Switching System 1965 Western Electric Telephone Technology
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net 'Title refers to: Electronic Switching System. Great footage of 1960s technological breakthroughs with silicon semiconductors; early microscopic manufacturing; great early Silicon Valley solid-state manufacturing technology breakthroughs, and early nanotechnology. Great footage high tech electronics assembly; silicon crystals, transistors, circuitry, early computer-industry related technology. ...CU blinking orange-red light, camera pans down machine control panel, disembodied finger presses red switch. Great ...VS BW stock footage of women and men in 1930s working in factory manufacturing telephone parts. ...Pan down row of 1960s women looking into microscopes assembling telephone parts; CU pin of precision device used to produce tiny part; woman sticks arms into gloves extending into controlled vacuum chamber glass chamber, camera pans out to show various women working on similar tasks down row; women with drill in pieces on large board of electronics, camera pans over women with drills working on electronics switching system. ...Pan down wall of ESS electronic telephone service electronics and electronic magnetized memory banks; animated diagram shows how ESS works superimposed over wall of magnetized memory card bank. ...Zoom in on stored program control unit; memory unit Twistor module moves down conveyor line, male and female workers use microscopes and magnifying glasses to look at memory unit; CU machine producing special Twistor wire; VS long thing metal Twistor wires move along machine passing through mylar polyethylene belts... ...Great shot machine dropping tiny metal reeds into racks progressed forward on conveyor line... ...CU worker examines ferried switches under microscope. ...Spinning molten furnace producing silicon crystals; camera zooms on man removing silicon crystal from machine... ...Camera pans out from electronic box with blink yellow light room of women at work looking through hi-tech microscopes and assembly solid state components... ...Woman testing semiconductors using electronic monitor; VS women assembling circuit boards; machine rapidly shakes board of ESS coils... ...Large spool of punched tape for computer system. ...CU disembodied hand holding drill drills in wire and patches it to other part of switch board; pan down rows and rows of men working on huge banks of wiring of ESS switchboard. Great shots of early metal film production using photo emulsion process; Nikon shadowgraph is used to check resistor pattern; CU resistor pattern on shadowgraph... ...CU molten furnace producing silicon crystal. ' Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_switching_system In telecommunications, an electronic switching system (ESS) is a telephone switch that uses digital electronics and computerized control to interconnect telephone circuits for the purpose of establishing telephone calls. The generations of telephone switches before the advent of electronic switching in the 1950s used purely electro-mechanical relay systems and analog voice paths. These early machines typically utilized the step-by-step technique. The first generation of electronic switching systems in the 1960s were not entirely digital in nature, but used reed relay-operated metallic paths or crossbar switches operated by stored program control (SPC) systems. First announced in 1955, the first customer trial installation of an all-electronic central office commenced in Morris, Illinois in November 1960 by Bell Laboratories. The first prominent large-scale electronic switching system was the Number One Electronic Switching System (1ESS) of the Bell System in the United States, introduced in Succasunna, New Jersey, in May 1965. Later electronic switching systems implemented the digital representation of the electrical audio signals on subscriber loops by digitizing the analog signals and processing the resulting data for transmission between central offices. Time-division multiplexing (TDM) technology permitted the simultaneous transmission of multiple telephone calls on a single wire connection between central offices or other electronic switches, resulting in dramatic capacity improvements of the telephone network... In the late 20th century most telephone exchanges without TDM processing were eliminated and the term electronic switching system became largely a historical distinction for the older SPC systems...
Views: 65849 Jeff Quitney
Step-by-Step Telephone Switch Line Finder HD
 
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Some various short video clips from a Western Electric Strowger telephone switch from a telephone office. I'm working on a video of my switch, and thought I'd upload a few sample clips.
Views: 79105 westernelectric
Working in a telephone exchange,  1960's -- Film 3792
 
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Telephone exchange. Going for an interview as a telephone operator. Hand writing test. Training in class and use of the old style exchanges. Dummy exchange for training. London Telephone Exchange. Emergency numbers. Continental Exchange and you have to speak French.
Views: 22415 HuntleyFilmArchives
UAX13 Telephone Exchange
 
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A live public UAX13 Telephone Exchange filmed in September 1989. This was a British Post Office rural telephone exchange in common use throughout the UK.
Views: 27850 conceptcity
Design an Intercom in 5 Minutes using old telephones(DIY)
 
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[email protected] Note: you can use 9v battery instead of 12v adapter that is shown in the video. Resister value depends upon you.. Try using different resistors. It may vary from one telephone to other
Views: 45909 Natarajan PM
Automatic Electric 32A21 PAX telephone switching system.
 
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A 1950's vintage automatic telephone system in operation.
Views: 6458 smithno41
Panasonic KX-TES824 PBX configuration
 
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How to configure panasonic tes824 pbx for a small office. Here you can watch tutorial as an office pbx setup. Panasonic KX-TDA100 Software Programming https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfFq648HCRA Panasonic KX-TES824 Software https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OoTsekDLAk
Views: 31694 Safeer Techie
Old-style telephone exchange in use
 
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This is an old analog Strowger Switch: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strowger_switch And kids making pizza orders! This is at the Museum of Independent Telephony in Abilene, KS Full story and comments at http://changelog.complete.org/archives/9811-the-joy-of-exploring-old-phone-systems-pizza-and-discovery
Views: 2007 CosmicRay2515
DIY Hacks & How To's: Phone Intercom
 
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In this project, I show you how you can make a simple intercom system from a pair of old corded telephones. The phones already have all the circuitry that is needed for processing a voice call. All you need to add is a 9 volt battery and a resistor. This is an easy electronics project for beginners and it is great to do with children. Try it out and have fun. Here's the full build on MAKE: Projects--http://makezine.com/projects/simple-intercom-from-a-pair-of-old-corded-phones/ and on Instructables: http://www.instructables.com/id/Simple-Intercom-From-a-Pair-of-Old-Corded-Phones/
Views: 287514 Make:
VS Compact Installation Complete
 
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For high packaging density at sites with restricted space conditions. The main applications are in the remote access, CCC and PABX areas. VS Compact is distinguished by the best transmission values and the number of structural sizes (2, 5, 8, 10, 16, 20 and 25 DA). VS Compact can also be connected doubled and with stranded wires.
PBX vs IP PBX | Difference In Business Phone Systems
 
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http://ModernBusinessPhoneSystem.com A PBX is typically a digital system using TDM. An IP PBX is given an IP address on the customer's Local Area Network, LAN as are each of the telephones. The calls are transmitted using IP or internet protocol. That is keeping it pretty simple. It really depends on how robust your network is on whether you want to use an IP PBX. It is very easy to do moves, adds and changes with an IP system.
Views: 58116 VirtualCommLLC
Analog, Digital, & VoIP phones
 
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a quick and simple explanation for new telecom techs, IT managers or office administrators. The three different technologies are all being used simultaneously in the business environment today . And, to a lesser extend, in the residential environment as well. The problem comes in when people start trying to solve problems by mixing the different phone types. This has the potential to damage the equipment.
Views: 35043 DIY Telecom
How to setup a PBX (step by step guide)
 
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Full series: http://www.ringroost.com/how-to-setup-a-pbx.php Learn how to setup your office PBX. Taylor walks through how to use RingRoost to setup your own PBX - for really cheap.
Views: 301954 RingRoost
The Life of a Telephone Operator in 1969 (with special introduction) - AT&T Archives
 
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See more from the AT&T Archives at http://techchannel.att.com/archives Bonus Edition Introduction by George Kupczak of the AT&T Archives and History Center. A non-linear documentary about operators - male and female, but mostly female - at their work, and describing their work and the type of customers they encounter. A fascinating inside look at the skills needed by operators in dealing with the public. Shot in the style of a Maysles- or Weisman-type documentary. There are clips from a 1913 D.W. Griffith silent film, Telephone Girl and the Lady, at the beginning and end. "The operator's job, despite tensions and aggravations, is one which consists primarily of human contact and as such, carries rich rewards." Cox went on to direct television in Hollywood and also documentaries for PBS. She now lives in Kentucky and still makes documentaries. Cox also made "All in a Day's Work" for AT&T. Directed by Nell Cox Song "Operator" by the New York Rock & Roll Ensemble was originally released as a 45rpm record. Footage courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
Views: 135838 AT&T Tech Channel
My Home PBX System - Panasonic KX-TD816 / KX-TVP200
 
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Dreaming of having your own Home PBX (telephone system)? Watch this video to see an overview of my system. My system consists of a Panasonic KX-TD816 (software version 1) Hybrid PBX and a KX-TVP200 Voice Processing System and many KX-T7230 digital speaker-phones with LCD display. Links to documentation: TD816 brochure: http://www.voicesonic.com/panasonic/manuals/KX-TD816-1232_System/Panasonic-KX-TD816-KX-TD1232.pdf TVP200 brochure: http://www.phoneservice.ro/ro/catalog/voice_mail/KX-TVP200300.pdf TD816 software versions: http://www.ntci.net/Tech-Notes/version_options.htm User manuals, Installation manuals, Programming manuals also readily available on the web.
Views: 178293 VE2ZAZ
What is PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE? What does PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE mean?
 
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What is PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE? What does PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE mean? PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE meaning - PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE definition - PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A private branch exchange (PBX) is a telephone exchange or switching system that serves a private organization and performs concentration of central office lines or trunks and provides intercommunication between a large number of telephone stations in the organization. The central office lines provide connections to the public switched telephone network and the concentration aspect of a PBX permits the shared use of these lines between all stations in the organization. The intercommunication aspect allows two or more stations to directly connect while not using the public switched telephone network. Each PBX-connected station, such as a telephone set, a fax machine, or a computer modem, is often referred to as an extension and has a designated extension telephone number that may or may not be mapped automatically to the numbering plan of the central office and the telephone number block allocated to the PBX. Initially, PBX systems offered the primary advantage of cost savings for internal phone calls: handling the circuit switching locally reduced charges for telephone service via central-office lines. As PBX systems gained popularity, they began to feature services not available in the public network, such as hunt groups, call forwarding, and extension dialing. From the 1960s a simulated PBX known as Centrex provided similar features from the central telephone exchange. A PBX differs from a key telephone system (KTS) in that users of a key system manually select their own outgoing lines on special telephone sets that control buttons for this purpose, while PBXs select the outgoing line automatically, or formerly, by an operator. The telephone sets connected to a PBX do not normally have special keys for central-office line control, but it is not uncommon for key systems to be connected to a PBX to extend its services. A PBX, in contrast to a key system, employs an organizational numbering plan for its stations. In addition, a dial plan determines whether additional digit sequences must be prefixed when dialing to obtain access to a central-office trunk. Modern number-analysis systems permit users to dial internal and external telephone numbers without special codes to distinguish the intended destination. The term PBX originated when switchboard operators managed company switchboards manually using cord circuits. As automated electromechanical switches and later electronic switching systems gradually replaced the manual systems, the terms private automatic branch exchange (PABX) and private manual branch exchange (PMBX) differentiated them. Solid-state digital systems were sometimes referred to as electronic private automatic branch exchanges (EPABX). As of 2016, the term PBX is by far the most widely recognized. The abbreviation now applies to all types of complex, in-house telephony switching systems. Two significant developments during the 1990s led to new types of PBX systems. One was the massive growth of data networks and increased public understanding of packet switching. Companies needed packet-switched networks for data, so using them for telephone calls proved tempting, and the availability of the Internet as a global delivery system made packet-switched communications even more attractive. These factors led to the development of the voice over IP PBX, or IP-PBX. The other trend involved the idea of focusing on core competence. PBX services had always been hard to arrange for smaller companies, and many companies realized that handling their own telephony was not their core competence. These considerations gave rise to the concept of the hosted PBX. In wireline telephony, the original hosted PBX was the Centrex service provided by telcos since the 1960s; later competitive offerings evolved into the modern competitive local exchange carrier. In voice over IP, hosted solutions are easier to implement as the PBX may be located at and managed by any telephone service provider, connecting to the individual extensions via the Internet. The upstream provider no longer needs to run direct, local leased lines to the served premises....
Views: 2218 The Audiopedia

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