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Wikipedia In Print - How to create custom books with a mix of content from the free encyclopedia
 
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This screencast shows how one can easily create unique printed books with individual selections of Wikipedia content. The tool can be started here: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:Book&bookcmd=book_creator The price of books depends on the number of pages, starting from US$ 8.90 for books up to 100 pages. 10% of the gross sales price goes to the Wikimedia Foundation. Books are perfect bound, printed in the dimensions 8.5 inch x 5.5 inch (216 mm x 140 mm) and contain a table of contents, your chapters and articles, licensing information next to an index. More information on printed books can be found in the FAQ: http://pediapress.com/faq/
Views: 46317 pediapress
Print Wikipedia
 
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The story of Print Wikipedia by Michael Mandiberg. All of English Wikipedia in 7,473 books. View on Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Print_Wikipedia_%28no_subtitles%29.webm (with burned-in English subtitles): https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Print_Wikipedia_by_Michael_Mandiberg.webm YouTube: (with burned-in English subtitles): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5eATHPf-14 Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/131706668 (with burned-in English subtitles): https://vimeo.com/131706665
Views: 2462 Wikimedia Foundation
Printing Wikipedia: the Wikipedia Books Project
 
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Visit: http://wikipediabooks.org/cf Music: "FM" von Jahzzar (http://betterwithmusic.com) Crowdfundingvideo: http://alexboerger.de
Views: 5907 pediapress
What is SCREEN PRINTING? What does SCREEN PRINTING mean? SCREEN PRINTING meaning
 
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What is SCREEN PRINTING? What does SCREEN PRINTING mean? SCREEN PRINTING meaning - SCREEN PRINTING definition - SCREEN PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Screen printing is a printing technique whereby a mesh is used to transfer ink onto a substrate, except in areas made impermeable to the ink by a blocking stencil. A blade or squeegee is moved across the screen to fill the open mesh apertures with ink, and a reverse stroke then causes the screen to touch the substrate momentarily along a line of contact. This causes the ink to wet the substrate and be pulled out of the mesh apertures as the screen springs back after the blade has passed. Screen printing is also a stencil method of print making in which a design is imposed on a screen of polyester or other fine mesh, with blank areas coated with an impermeable substance. Ink is forced into the mesh openings by the fill blade or squeegee and by wetting the substrate, transferred onto the printing surface during the squeegee stroke. As the screen rebounds away from the substrate the ink remains on the substrate. It is also known as silk-screen, screen, serigraphy, and serigraph printing. One color is printed at a time, so several screens can be used to produce a multicoloured image or design. There are various terms used for what is essentially the same technique. Traditionally the process was called screen printing or silkscreen printing because silk was used in the process prior to the invention of polyester mesh. Currently, synthetic threads are commonly used in the screen printing process. The most popular mesh in general use is made of polyester. There are special-use mesh materials of nylon and stainless steel available to the screen printer. There are also different types of mesh size which will determine the outcome and look of the finished design on the material.
Views: 2744 The Audiopedia
What is COLD FOIL PRINTING? What does COLD FOIL PRINTING mean? COLD FOIL PRINTING meaning
 
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What is COLD FOIL PRINTING? What does COLD FOIL PRINTING mean? COLD FOIL PRINTING meaning - COLD FOIL PRINTING definition - COLD FOIL PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Cold foil printing, also known as cold foil stamping, is a modern method of printing metallic foil on a substrate in order to enhance the aesthetic of the final product. Cold foil printing can be done two ways: the older dry lamination process common in the offset printing industry, or the newer, more versatile wet lamination process, which is dominant in the flexo label industry. Using a standard printing plate, an image is printed onto a substrate with the use of a ultraviolet-curable cold foil adhesive. An ultraviolet dryer then cures the adhesive, which becomes tacky. Foil spools from an unwind and is nipped to a substrate. Foil sticks to the tacky adhesive on the substrate, and an image with a bright foil surface is created. Foil that does not adhere to the adhesive remains on a thin polyester liner, and waste is directed to a rewind spool. Because the adhesive is applied on press like a conventional ink, no expensive stamping die has to be created. Once printed, the surface of cold foil images may be varnished, laminated, or encapsulated in order to provide a hard-wearing, durable surface. Some printing substrates are unsuitable for cold foil transfer. The best results are obtained on glossy coated papers and papers with a smooth surface. Weights from about 80 to 500 g/m^2 are possible. The process does not require stamping tools, but instead uses printing plates, which are cheaper and can be made in a few hours. In contrast, delivery time for an engraved or etched stamping tool can be up to two weeks. More importantly for the designer, gradients and halftone images can be introduced. Cold foil evolved from hot foil stamping. Hot foil stamping is mostly used offline when foil is required on a preprinted substrate, such as in the manufacture of greeting cards and special occasion ribbons. Hot foil is economical but very slow. The types of graphics that can be applied are usually limited to text and bold images. Hot foil is not usable with heat-sensitive substrates such as polyethylene, vinyl, or shrink film. Cold foil takes the idea of hot foil stamping and makes it more convenient and cost-effective. The cold foil functions like an additional ink and is actually a UV-curable, very fast lamination adhesive and can be bonded in-line in a single run using a printing plate for either flexographic web printing or offset sheet-fed printing. It can be applied precisely with high resolution, even for fine structures such as raster gradients and thin lines. Typeface is legible from about 5 points upwards and has excellent edge definition. Cold foil printing needs smooth surface substrates for excellent image quality. As the cold foil market evolves, major players in the printing industry are finding ways to make the process even more cost-effective. By indexing cold foil, printers can reduce foil waste, reduce their presses' downtime, and in turn maximize their presses' efficiency. Cold foil is most commonly used on products that call for a strong "shelf appeal", such as household consumables, cigarette cartons, wine labels, and cosmetic packaging. It provides a luxurious metallic look on higher added-value label applications.
Views: 4669 The Audiopedia
State Printing Company | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_Printing_Company 00:00:44 1 The History of the Printing Company 00:00:54 1.1 The beginning 00:02:54 1.2 From 1901 with the name State Printing House 00:05:12 1.3 The first Hungarian postage stamp – 1871 00:07:20 1.4 State Printing Company as a private company 00:10:31 1.5 Products 00:12:19 2 Sources 00:13:18 3 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7642366551478824 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= ANY Security Printing Company or ANY Biztonsági Nyomda Nyrt. (former State Printing Company) is one of the largest security printing companies in Hungary and the CEE region. Previously, the company produced traditional printing products. Today its activities are focused on document security products and solutions, plastic card production and personalization, electronic document management and bulk transactional printing. The company’s shares have been listed on the Budapest Stock Exchange since December 2005.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
What is PRINTING PRESS? What does PRINTING PRESS mean? PRINTING PRESS meaning & explanation
 
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What is PRINTING PRESS? What does PRINTING PRESS mean? PRINTING PRESS meaning - PRINTING PRESS definition - PRINTING PRESS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. Typically used for texts, the invention and spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium revolutionizing the way people conceive and describe the world they live in, and ushering in the period of modernity. The printing press was invented in the Holy Roman Empire by the German Johannes Gutenberg around 1440, based on existing screw presses. Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed a complete printing system, which perfected the printing process through all of its stages by adapting existing technologies to the printing purposes, as well as making groundbreaking inventions of his own. His newly devised hand mould made for the first time possible the precise and rapid creation of metal movable type in large quantities, a key element in the profitability of the whole printing enterprise. The printing press spread within several decades to over two hundred cities in a dozen European countries. By 1500, printing presses in operation throughout Western Europe had already produced more than twenty million volumes. In the 16th century, with presses spreading further afield, their output rose tenfold to an estimated 150 to 200 million copies. The operation of a press became so synonymous with the enterprise of printing that it lent its name to an entire new branch of media, the press. In Renaissance Europe, the arrival of mechanical movable type printing introduced the era of mass communication which permanently altered the structure of society: The relatively unrestricted circulation of information and (revolutionary) ideas transcended borders, captured the masses in the Reformation and threatened the power of political and religious authorities; the sharp increase in literacy broke the monopoly of the literate elite on education and learning and bolstered the emerging middle class. Across Europe, the increasing cultural self-awareness of its peoples led to the rise of proto-nationalism, accelerated by the flowering of the European vernacular languages to the detriment of Latin's status as lingua franca. In the 19th century, the replacement of the hand-operated Gutenberg-style press by steam-powered rotary presses allowed printing on an industrial scale, while Western-style printing was adopted all over the world, becoming practically the sole medium for modern bulk printing.
Views: 899 The Audiopedia
Global spread of the printing press | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_spread_of_the_printing_press 00:00:33 1 Spread of the Gutenberg press 00:00:43 1.1 Germany 00:01:29 1.2 Europe 00:02:46 1.3 Rest of the world 00:05:41 2 Dates by location 00:05:54 2.1 Germany, Austria and German printers in Central Europe 00:06:05 2.2 Rest of Europe 00:06:14 2.2.1 Italy 00:07:05 2.2.2 Switzerland 00:07:13 2.2.3 France 00:07:28 2.2.4 Spain 00:07:36 2.2.5 Belgium 00:07:43 2.2.6 The Netherlands 00:07:58 2.2.7 Hungary 00:08:18 2.2.8 Poland 00:08:35 2.2.9 Czechia 00:08:43 2.2.10 England 00:08:50 2.2.11 Denmark 00:08:58 2.2.12 Sweden 00:09:06 2.2.13 Portugal 00:09:14 2.2.14 Croatia 00:09:22 2.2.15 Serbia and Montenegro 00:09:45 2.2.16 Scotland 00:09:53 2.2.17 Romania 00:10:01 2.2.18 Greece 00:10:09 2.2.19 Lithuania and Belarus 00:10:18 2.2.20 Iceland 00:10:26 2.2.21 Norway 00:10:33 2.2.22 Ireland 00:10:41 2.2.23 Russia 00:11:12 2.2.24 Latvia 00:11:20 2.2.25 Ukraine 00:11:28 2.2.26 Estonia 00:11:36 2.2.27 Finland 00:11:44 2.2.28 Georgia 00:12:04 2.2.29 Armenia 00:12:30 2.2.30 Greenland 00:12:38 2.3 Latin America 00:12:47 2.3.1 Mexico 00:12:55 2.3.2 Peru 00:13:02 2.3.3 Guatemala 00:13:11 2.3.4 Paraguay 00:13:18 2.3.5 Cuba 00:13:26 2.3.6 Colombia 00:13:34 2.3.7 Ecuador 00:13:42 2.3.8 Chile 00:13:50 2.3.9 Argentina 00:13:58 2.3.10 Puerto Rico 00:14:06 2.3.11 Uruguay 00:14:14 2.3.12 Brazil 00:14:22 2.3.13 Venezuela 00:14:30 2.4 Africa 00:14:38 2.5 Asia 00:14:47 2.5.1 South Asia 00:14:55 2.5.2 Ottoman Empire 00:15:44 2.5.3 Southeast Asia 00:15:52 2.5.4 East Asia 00:16:01 2.5.5 Middle East 00:16:09 2.6 North America 00:16:17 2.7 Australia & Oceania 00:16:20 3 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8334099893969357 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The global spread of the printing press began with the invention of the printing press with movable type by Johannes Gutenberg in Mainz, Germany c. 1439. Western printing technology was adopted in all world regions by the end of the 19th century, displacing the manuscript and block printing. In the Western world, the operation of a press became synonymous with the enterprise of publishing and lent its name to a new branch of media, the "press" (see List of the oldest newspapers).
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
What is VISCOSITY PRINTING? What does VISCOSITY PRINTING mean? VISCOSITY PRINTING meaning
 
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What is VISCOSITY PRINTING? What does VISCOSITY PRINTING mean? VISCOSITY PRINTING meaning - VISCOSITY PRINTING definition - VISCOSITY PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Viscosity printing is a multi-color printmaking technique that incorporates principles of relief printing and intaglio printing. It was pioneered by Stanley William Hayter. The process uses the principle of viscosity to print multiple colors of ink from a single plate, rather than relying upon multiple plates for color separation. It is a fine art printmaking technique, making original prints in limited editions, as it is slow and allows too much variation between proofs to make large editions feasible. Color viscosity printing is among the latest developments in intaglio printmaking. Stanley William Hayter developed it during the late 1960s in Paris. There are a number of different types of original print methods to be aware of. Intaglio prints: for example a dollar bill—bills and most stamps are engraved in metal plates and are printed after a viscous ink (about the consistency of oil paint) is forced into grooves, scratches, etched lines or indentations. The polished surface is then wiped clean using newsprint and tarlatan, leaving ink only below plate level. The plate is then covered with a dampened paper and felt blankets. It is run through the press where great pressure (approximately 8 tons to the square inch) pushes the dampened paper down into the engraved or etched grooves to pick up ink. In other words, in intaglio we see printed what is below the surface of the plate and the ink is now embossed on the paper. Among the greatest masters of engraving and etching are Albrecht Dürer, Hans Holbein the Younger, Rembrandt, Goya, and Picasso. Three to four colors of ink are mixed, each of a different viscosity. This viscosity is adjusted by the addition of uncooked linseed oil. Metal plates, usually copper or zinc, are used, as in the intaglio processes. The artist produces images on the plate by etching lines or textures. The plate is then inked in several stages. The first ink would be fairly dense—of a relatively high viscosity. The application of the high-viscosity ink is carried out as in any intaglio process: by forcing it into the recesses of the plate and then wiping off the plate's surface with a tarlatan. Ink of a second color, and the thinnest viscosity, is then applied to the surface of the plate with a hard rubber roller, so that it covers the plate in one pass and only transfers onto the highest areas of the plate. Ink of a third color, and a much stiffer consistency, is then applied to the lower areas of the plate with a softer rubber roller. The varying viscosities of the two rolled-on inks prevent them from mixing. A fourth color, of even thinner viscosity, can also be applied at this point. This color is either spread out on a glass plate, which is then pressed against the printing plate so that the ink only adheres to the highest points of the metal plate, or it is applied by a hard roller applied with very little pressure. This process may be done with a monotype as well. Inking the acrylic or plexiglass plate with one ink with a very high viscosity, and following that, rolling a very loose ink over it, produces two tones on a single plate. One may attempt to scratch an image onto the plate, but acrylic and plexiglass plates are more temperamental than copper or zinc, and wear out sooner. A sheet of printing paper is then placed on the upright plate and passed through a printing press, which prints all of the colors simultaneously. This is of a certain advantage, as in some other multi-color printing processes, correct registration of the blocks presents a difficulty.
Views: 642 The Audiopedia
Print Wikipedia
 
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Print Wikipedia Print Wikipedia is an art project by Michael Mandiberg that printed 106 of the 7,473 volumes of English Wikipedia as it existed on April 7, 2015 and also included wallpaper displaying 1,980 additional volumes12 A 36-volume index of all of the 75 million contributors to English Wikipedia is also part of the project The table of contents takes up 91 700-page volumes3 The printed volume only includes text of the articles Images and references are not included4 The project was shown at Denny Gallery in New York City in the summer of 20155 Wikipedia page from Contributor Appendix detail Michael originally thought of the project in 2009 but ran into technical difficulties He then engaged an assistant, Jonathan Kirinathan, to aid with the programming of the code to compile, format and upload an entire English Wikipedia download1 The print files were uploaded to self book publisher Lulucom and are available for printout as paper volumes Michaels motivation was to answer the question, "How big is it" For a big data entity, its size is on the threshold of what can be perceivprint wikipedia, print wikipedia page, hatch show print wikipedia, block print wikipedia, micul print wikipedia, print wikipedia article Print Wikipedia
Views: 2 Speaking Videos
Inkjet printing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inkjet_printing 00:02:02 1 Methods 00:02:22 1.1 Continuous inkjet 00:05:53 1.2 Drop-on-demand 00:06:11 1.2.1 Thermal DOD 00:08:37 1.2.2 Piezoelectric DOD 00:10:24 2 Ink formulations 00:17:27 3 Printing heads 00:17:48 3.1 Fixed head 00:19:32 3.2 Disposable head 00:21:28 3.3 Cleaning mechanisms 00:26:55 4 Advantages 00:29:18 5 Disadvantages 00:34:14 6 Durability 00:38:06 7 Operating cost tradeoffs 00:40:16 8 Business model 00:46:39 9 Printer types 00:46:49 9.1 Professional models 00:52:18 9.2 SOHO multifunction inkjet photo printers 00:53:03 9.3 Professional inkjet photo printers 00:54:36 10 Other uses 00:56:46 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7937704321162853 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Inkjet printing is a type of computer printing that recreates a digital image by propelling droplets of ink onto paper, plastic, or other substrates. Inkjet printers are the most commonly used type of printer, and range from small inexpensive consumer models to expensive professional machines. The concept of inkjet printing originated in the 20th century, and the technology was first extensively developed in the early 1950s. Starting in the late 1970s, inkjet printers that could reproduce digital images generated by computers were developed, mainly by Epson, Hewlett-Packard (HP) and Canon. In the worldwide consumer market, four manufacturers account for the majority of inkjet printer sales: Canon, HP, Epson and Brother. The emerging ink jet material deposition market also uses inkjet technologies, typically printheads using piezoelectric crystals, to deposit materials directly on substrates. The technology has been extended and the 'ink' can now also comprise solder paste in PCB assembly, or living cells, for creating biosensors and for tissue engineering.Images produced on inkjet printers are sometime sold under other names since the term is associated with words like "digital", "computers", and "everyday printing", which can have negative connotations in some contexts. These trade names or coined terms are usually used in the fine arts reproduction field. They include Digigraph, Iris prints (or Giclée), and Cromalin.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Printing industry in India | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Printing industry in India Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The printing industry in India is an important industry in that country.Printing, means of producing reproductions of written material or images in multiple copies. There are four traditional types of printing: relief printing (with which this article is mainly concerned), intaglio, lithography, and screen process printing. Relief printing encompasses type, stereotype, electrotype, and letterpress. Flexographic printing is a form of rotary letterpress printing using flexible rubber plates and rapid-drying inks.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
American Bank Note Company Printing Plant | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Bank_Note_Company_Printing_Plant 00:01:11 1 History 00:03:33 1.1 Sunnyslope Mansion and Printer's Park 00:04:58 2 American Bank Note era 00:05:26 2.1 Pre-construction planning 00:07:32 2.2 Staged construction 00:09:07 2.3 Post construction 00:11:06 2.4 Engraving and counterfeiting departments 00:11:59 2.5 Bombing 00:13:09 2.6 Relocation 00:13:29 3 Post Bank Note era 00:13:39 3.1 Ownership changes 00:14:50 3.2 Renovation controversies 00:15:51 3.3 Landmark status 00:17:41 3.4 Significant tenants 00:17:51 3.4.1 Wildcat High School 00:18:28 3.4.2 Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance 00:19:28 3.4.3 Bronx Business Incubator 00:20:10 4 Transportation Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9128009025542284 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The American Bank Note Company Printing Plant is a repurposed printing plant in the Hunts Point section of The Bronx, New York City that is occupied by a business incubator. The building was built in 1909 by the American Bank Note Company, which occupied it until 1985. In addition to printing paper documents, stamps, and currency, the plant also minted coins, and was thus known by local area residents as The Penny Factory.The building has subsequently changed hands several times, undergone a series of renovations, and been granted landmark status. It now houses a business incubator and serves as one of the cornerstones for a revitalization of the Hunts Point area. It is one of two structures in the city built by the American Bank Note Company in the early 20th century. The other, the American Bank Note Company Building in Manhattan's Financial District, housed the corporate offices.The building occupies the block bordered by Garrison Avenue, Tiffany Street, Lafayette Avenue, and Barretto Street. The block is roughly pentagonal, with Barretto curving to form two sides.
Views: 40 wikipedia tts
Printing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Printing 00:00:50 1 History 00:00:59 1.1 Woodblock printing 00:01:30 1.1.1 In East Asia 00:02:51 1.1.2 In the Middle East 00:03:40 1.1.3 In Europe 00:04:56 1.2 Movable-type printing 00:07:00 1.3 The printing press 00:08:30 1.4 Rotary printing press 00:08:58 1.5 Printing capacity 00:09:15 2 Conventional printing technology 00:10:43 2.1 Letterpress 00:11:28 2.2 Offset 00:12:19 2.3 Gravure 00:13:17 2.4 Flexography 00:13:48 2.5 Other printing techniques 00:15:14 3 Impact of German movable type printing press 00:15:25 3.1 Quantitative aspects 00:15:48 3.2 Religious impact 00:18:22 3.3 Social impact 00:21:04 3.4 Educational Impact 00:21:27 3.4.1 The language of Scholarship 00:21:55 3.4.2 University Libraries 00:22:47 3.4.3 Curriculum 00:23:18 4 Comparison of printing methods 00:23:29 5 Digital printing 00:26:38 6 3D printing 00:27:12 7 Gang run printing 00:28:11 8 Printed electronics 00:29:00 9 Printing terminologies Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9581230546456602 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Printing is a process for reproducing text and images using a master form or template. The earliest non-paper products involving printing include cylinder seals and objects such as the Cyrus Cylinder and the Cylinders of Nabonidus. The earliest known form of printing as applied to paper was woodblock printing, which appeared in China before 220 AD. Later developments in printing technology include the movable type invented by Bi Sheng around 1040 AD and the printing press invented by Johannes Gutenberg in the 15th century. The technology of printing played a key role in the development of the Renaissance and the scientific revolution, and laid the material basis for the modern knowledge-based economy and the spread of learning to the masses.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Pre-flight (printing) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-flight_(printing) 00:00:54 Background 00:02:51 The preflight process 00:06:33 History Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.812328880869556 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In printing, Preflight is the process of confirming that the digital files required for the printing process are all present, valid, correctly formatted, and of the desired type. The basic idea is to prepare the files to make them feasible for the correct process such as offset printing and eliminate costly errors and facilitate a smooth production. It is an standard prepress procedure in the printing industry (as it is imposition). The term originates from the preflight checklists used by pilots. The term was first used in a presentation at the Color Connections conference in 1990 by consultant Chuck Weger, and Professor Ron Bertolina was a pioneer for solutions to preflighting in the 1990s.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
3D printing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3D_printing 00:02:04 1 Terminology 00:05:05 2 History 00:10:47 3 General principles 00:10:57 3.1 Modeling 00:12:27 3.2 Printing 00:15:38 3.3 Finishing 00:17:18 3.4 Multi-material printing 00:19:31 4 Processes and printers 00:28:34 5 Applications 00:42:55 6 Legal aspects 00:43:05 6.1 Intellectual property 00:45:47 6.2 Gun legislation and administration 00:48:13 6.3 Aerospace regulation 00:49:22 7 Health and safety 00:53:23 7.1 Health regulation 00:54:16 8 Impact 00:55:17 8.1 Social change 01:04:24 8.2 Environmental change Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8563420906979798 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The term 3D printing covers a variety of processes in which material is joined or solidified under computer control to create a three-dimensional object, with material being added together (such as liquid molecules or powder grains being fused together), typically layer by layer. In the 1990s, 3D printing techniques were considered suitable only for the production of functional or aesthetical prototypes and a more appropriate term was rapid prototyping. Today, the precision, repeatability and material range have increased to the point that some 3D printing processes are considered viable as an industrial production technology, whereby the term additive manufacturing can be used synonymously with 3D printing. One of the key advantages of 3D printing is the ability to produce very complex shapes or geometries, and a prerequisite for producing any 3D printed part is a digital 3D model or a CAD file. The most commonly used 3D Printing process is a material extrusion technique called fused deposition modeling (FDM). Metal Powder bed fusion has been gaining prominence lately during the immense applications of metal parts in the 3D printing industry. In 3D Printing, a three-dimensional object is built from a computer-aided design (CAD) model, usually by successively adding material layer by layer, unlike the conventional machining process, where material is removed from a stock item, or the casting and forging processes which date to antiquity.The term "3D printing" originally referred to a process that deposits a binder material onto a powder bed with inkjet printer heads layer by layer. More recently, the term is being used in popular vernacular to encompass a wider variety of additive manufacturing techniques. United States and global technical standards use the official term additive manufacturing for this broader sense.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Construction 3D printing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Construction_3D_printing 00:01:58 1 History 00:02:06 1.1 Seeding technologies 1950 - 1995 00:02:58 1.2 Early developments 1995 - 2000 00:04:18 1.3 First generation 2000 - 2010 00:06:04 1.4 Second generation 2010 - present 00:12:45 2 Design 00:15:07 3 Structures 00:15:16 3.1 3D printed buildings 00:17:27 3.2 3D printed bridges 00:18:50 3.3 3D printed architectural forms 00:19:39 3.4 Extraterrestrial printed structures 00:22:49 4 Concrete printing 00:25:37 5 Construction speed 00:26:43 6 Research and public knowledge 00:27:17 6.1 State-of-the-art research 00:28:27 6.2 First 3D Construction printing conference 00:29:30 6.3 Media interest 00:31:18 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9262755848469452 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Construction 3D Printing (c3Dp) or 3D Construction Printing (3DCP) refers to various technologies that use 3D printing as a core method to fabricate buildings or construction components. Alternative terms are also in use, such as Autonomous Robotic Construction System (ARCS) Large scale Additive Manufacturing (LSAM), or Freeform construction (FC), also to refer to sub-groups, such as '3D Concrete', used to refer to concrete extrusion technologies. There are a variety of 3D printing methods used at construction scale, these include the following main methods: extrusion (concrete/cement, wax, foam, polymers), powder bonding (polymer bond, reactive bond, sintering) and additive welding. 3D printing at a construction scale will have a wide variety of applications within the private, commercial, industrial and public sectors. Potential advantages of these technologies include faster construction, lower labor costs, increased complexity and/or accuracy, greater integration of function and less waste produced. A number of different approaches have been demonstrated to date which include on-site and off-site fabrication of buildings and construction components, using industrial robots, gantry systems and tethered autonomous vehicles. Demonstrations of construction 3D printing technologies to date have included fabrication of housing, construction components (cladding and structural panels and columns), bridges and civil infrastructure, artificial reefs, follies and sculptures. The technology has seen a significant increase in popularity in recent years with many new companies, including some backed up by prominent names from the construction industry and academia. This led to several important milestones, such as the first 3D printed building, the first 3D printed bridge the first 3D printed part in a public building, the first living 3D printed building in Europe and CIS, the first 3D printed building in Europe fully approved by the authorities (COBOD International), among many others.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Why can't we just print money to pay off debt?
 
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A video looking at way you can't simply print money to pay off debt. And what has happened when countries have tried to! And for that matter why a country having debt isn't necessarily a bad thing. The only reason the US has the most debt is because the US dollar is considered the most trust-worthy currency and other countries see the US as a safe place to put their money. It would be worse it countries started buying debt of other countries and stopped putting into the United States. The debt may be a lot but it's actually not something that's an issue. The US will never 'pay-off' its debt because that's not how it works. National debt only becomes an issue if GDP isn't growing, which it is. A more accurate way to see when the debt is an issue is the debt-GDP ration. In which the US is fine in that respect. Whereas Greece and Japan have debt-GDP ratios of over 150%, which is bad. Also, keep in mind that the US owns debt of many other countries. In fact, for every $1 of US debt, the US holds $0.89 of foreign debt. Note: if you're having trouble understanding the whole 'long-scale' and 'short-scale' talk then please read this Wiki article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales MUSIC: Hammock Fight - Kevin MacLeod - (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100213 IMAGES: White House: Matt Wade - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:UpstateNYer Assortment of Money - epSos.de Flickr users: Nick Ares(http://www.flickr.com/photos/aresauburnphotos/) Taki Steve (http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/) Kevinzim (http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/) (I wrongly credited ZeroOne in the video for the image of the Zimbabwean dollars, it's actually from Wikimedia Commons, and in the public domain) Wikipedia Articles: Hyperinflation - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperinflation Hyperinflation in Zimbabwe - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperinflation_in_Zimbabwe Zimbabwean Dollar - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zimbabwean_dollar Hungarian Pengo - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_pengo Names of large numbers - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_large_numbers Helpful YouTube videos: 'Who much money is there in the world' by Vsauce - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2tKg3E53DM 'Understanding the National Debt and Budget Deficit' by John Green of the Vlogbrother - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ugDU2qNcyg Clip art from http://www.clker.com/ FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER: www.twitter.com/wonderwhy7439
Views: 2176315 WonderWhy
MediaWiki: Printing a Wiki Page
 
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A quick guide to viewing a wiki page in a format most conducive to printing.
Views: 1637 jgrodel
Printer (computing) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Printer_(computing) 00:03:29 1 Types of printers 00:05:44 2 Technology 00:07:05 2.1 Modern print technology 00:07:21 2.1.1 Toner-based printers 00:08:05 2.1.2 Liquid inkjet printers 00:08:29 2.1.3 Solid ink printers 00:10:15 2.1.4 Dye-sublimation printers 00:11:06 2.1.5 Thermal printers 00:11:48 2.2 Obsolete and special-purpose printing technologies 00:12:11 2.2.1 Impact printers 00:13:42 2.2.1.1 Typewriter-derived printers 00:14:34 2.2.1.2 Teletypewriter-derived printers 00:15:26 2.2.1.3 Daisy wheel printers 00:16:17 2.2.1.4 Dot-matrix printers 00:20:08 2.2.1.5 Line printers 00:24:50 2.2.2 Liquid ink electrostatic printers 00:26:15 2.2.3 Plotters 00:27:07 2.3 Other printers 00:27:54 3 Attributes 00:28:04 3.1 Printer control languages 00:29:35 3.2 Printing speed 00:30:30 3.3 Printing mode 00:31:59 3.4 Monochrome, colour and photo printers 00:32:47 3.5 Page yield 00:33:27 3.6 Cost per page 00:34:01 3.7 Business model 00:35:23 3.8 Printer steganography 00:36:06 3.9 Wireless printers Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7706616667622311 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In computing, a printer is a peripheral device which makes a persistent human-readable representation of graphics or text on paper. The first computer printer designed was a mechanically driven apparatus by Charles Babbage for his difference engine in the 19th century; however, his mechanical printer design was not built until 2000. The first electronic printer was the EP-101, invented by Japanese company Epson and released in 1968. The first commercial printers generally used mechanisms from electric typewriters and Teletype machines. The demand for higher speed led to the development of new systems specifically for computer use. In the 1980s were daisy wheel systems similar to typewriters, line printers that produced similar output but at much higher speed, and dot matrix systems that could mix text and graphics but produced relatively low-quality output. The plotter was used for those requiring high quality line art like blueprints. The introduction of the low-cost laser printer in 1984 with the first HP LaserJet, and the addition of PostScript in next year's Apple LaserWriter, set off a revolution in printing known as desktop publishing. Laser printers using PostScript mixed text and graphics, like dot-matrix printers, but at quality levels formerly available only from commercial typesetting systems. By 1990, most simple printing tasks like fliers and brochures were now created on personal computers and then laser printed; expensive offset printing systems were being dumped as scrap. The HP Deskjet of 1988 offered the same advantages as laser printer in terms of flexibility, but produced somewhat lower quality output (depending on the paper) from much less expensive mechanisms. Inkjet systems rapidly displaced dot matrix and daisy wheel printers from the market. By the 2000s high-quality printers of this sort had fallen under the $100 price point and became commonplace. The rapid update of internet email through the 1990s and into the 2000s has largely displaced the need for printing as a means of moving documents, and a wide variety of reliable storage systems means that a "physical backup" is of little benefit today. Even the desire for printed output for "offline reading" while on mass transit or aircraft has been displaced by e-book readers and tablet computers. Today, traditional printers are being used more for special purposes, like printing photographs or artwork, and are no longer a must-have peripheral. Starting around 2010, 3D printing became an area of intense interest, allowing the creation of physical objects with the same sort of effort as an early laser printer required to produce a brochure. These devices are in their earliest stages of development and have not yet become commonplace.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts
How to create a good school project on Wikipedia
 
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[French] Plus une version linguistique de Wikipédia est développée, plus les attentes sont élevées et plus il est difficile d'y insérer un projet pédagogique. Depuis l'automne 2008, j'ai créé deux projets pédagogiques sur Wikipédia en français : le projet pédagogique au Cégep de Chicoutimi et le projet pédagogique à l'Université du Québec à Chicoutimi. J'ai utilisé ces derniers dans sept cours, principalement d'astronomie et d'astrophysique. Au total, les deux projets ont introduit environ 350 étudiants à la contribution à Wikipédia. Ces derniers ont créé environ 400 articles sur Wikipédia en français, téléversés environ 100 fichiers sur Wikimedia Commons, créé environ 100 articles sur Wikinews en français et transcrit environ 8 textes et 2 livres sur Wikisource en français. Au cours de cette présentation, je veux transmettre des techniques que j'ai développées. Avec ceux-ci, peut-être pourrez vous créer un projet pédagogique plus rapidement et avec moins d'efforts qu'il ne m'en a fallu. Je vais également profiter de l'occasion pour apporter des copies papier de mon manuel scolaire Wikipédia en éducation. Divisé en quatre parties (comment naviguer, étudier, contribuer et enseigner avec Wikipédia), il vise à donner des outils à n'importe quel intervenant en éducation désirant mieux utiliser Wikipédia, pour soi-même ou en classe, de manière passive (en naviguant) ou active (en contribuant). [English] As an edition of Wikipedia grows, so do the expectations. Therefore, it becomes harder and harder to make a good school project on big Wikipedias. Since Fall 2008, I created two school projects on French Wikipedia : the Cégep de Chicoutimi school project and the Université du Québec à Chicoutimi school project. I extended them in seven different courses, mainly in my astronomy and astrophysics classes. Both projects have introduced Wikipedia edition to about 350 students. They created about 400 articles on French Wikipedia, uploaded about 100 files on Commons, created about 100 articles on French Wikinews, completed about 8 texts and 2 books on French Wikisource. In this lecture, I will show some tips I learned. With these, maybe you will not follow bad paths and make a good school project more quickly and with less work than I did. I will also bring hard copies of my textbook Wikipédia en éducation. Divided in 4 parts (how to navigate, study, contribute and teach with Wikipedia), it is for people in education who want to make a better use of Wikipedia in this area, including contributing and building schools projects with it. https://wikimania2017.wikimedia.org/wiki/Submissions/How_to_create_a_good_school_project_on_Wikipedia
What is SUN PRINTING? What does SUN PRINTING mean? SUN PRINTING meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is SUN PRINTING? What does SUN PRINTING mean? SUN PRINTING meaning - SUN PRINTING definition - SUN PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Sun printing may refer to various printing techniques which use sunlight as a developing or fixative agent. Cyanotype, also referred to as "blueprinting", is the oldest non-silver photographic printing process. It involves exposing materials which have been treated with a solution of potassium ferricyanide and ferric ammonium citrate to a UV light source such as the sun. Negative or positive images can be obtained by blocking UV light from reaching the sensitized material. For example, a negative image can be produced by placing a leaf upon paper treated with this solution and exposing to sunlight for 10 to 20 minutes. The paper will retain the image of the leaf after it has been rinsed with water. Once the paper dries, parts that were exposed to the sun will turn a shade of Prussian blue (ferric ferrocyanide), while parts that were covered by the leaf will remain white. A specialized type of vat dye called Inkodye is also used for sun-printing due to its light-sensitive quality. Unlike other vat dyes which use oxygen to develop their color, Inkodyes are developed by light. These dyes are suspended in leuco form appearing colorless until they are exposed to UV. Their usage resembles that of cyanotype, but unlike cyanotype Inkodyes are primarily used on textiles and exist in a full range of colors. Exposure times vary from 3 to 15 minutes depending on the desired color and intensity of light. Once exposed, the sensitized material is washed in soapy water to remove dye from unexposed areas. Such dyes are typically used by craftspeople, fabric printers and artists and can be printed with photographic negatives, resist paste or through a silk screen. Sun printing may also refer to a photographic process using potassium dichromate which produces a negative plate for conventional lithographic printing. The process uses a film of gelatine spread on a flat and rigid surface. This is coated with a dilute solution of potassium dichromate and dried in low light conditions. A translucent positive is secured in tight contact with the treated gelatine layer and exposed to bright sunlight for a period of up to 30 minutes. During this time the sunlight and potassium dichromate tan the gelatine exposed to light. The plate is developed by washing in warm water and removing the untanned gelatine. Once dry, a relief print is revealed on the plate. The surface can be inked and printed in a hand press to produce any number of identical prints of the original subject.
Views: 82 The Audiopedia
Printing whole WIKIPEDIA!
 
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Hey guys in this video I imagined an absurd scenario that how many 🖨️ printers and pages will need if we print whole English Wikipedia. Searching for answer let's jump straight into video!
Views: 13 MIND'S EYE
Bureau of Engraving and Printing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Bureau of Engraving and Printing 00:00:52 1 History 00:03:33 2 Production 00:03:59 2.1 Postage stamp production 00:04:46 2.2 Currency production 00:07:23 3 Locations 00:07:40 3.1 District of Columbia location 00:09:31 3.2 Fort Worth location 00:10:24 3.3 Historic locations 00:10:56 4 BEP Police 00:11:27 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is a government agency within the United States Department of the Treasury that designs and produces a variety of security products for the United States government, most notable of which is Federal Reserve Notes (paper money) for the Federal Reserve, the nation's central bank. In addition to paper currency, the BEP produces Treasury securities; military commissions and award certificates; invitations and admission cards; and many different types of identification cards, forms, and other special security documents for a variety of government agencies. The BEP does not produce coins; all coinage is produced by the United States Mint. With production facilities in Washington, DC, and Fort Worth, Texas, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing is the largest producer of government security documents in the United States.
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
Printing press | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Printing_press 00:03:37 1 History 00:03:47 1.1 Economic conditions and intellectual climate 00:04:43 1.2 Technological factors 00:10:56 2 Function and approach 00:15:06 3 Gutenberg's press 00:17:32 4 The Printing Revolution 00:18:01 4.1 Mass production and spread of printed books 00:21:17 4.2 Circulation of information and ideas 00:25:00 5 Industrial printing presses 00:27:46 5.1 Rotary press 00:29:28 6 Gallery 00:29:37 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.706646865552846 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A printing press is a mechanical device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement on earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed, circa 1439, a printing system by adapting existing technologies to printing purposes, as well as making inventions of his own. Printing in East Asia had been prevalent since the Tang dynasty, and in Europe, woodblock printing based on existing screw presses was common by the 14th century. Gutenberg's most important innovation was the development of hand-molded metal printing matrices, thus producing a movable type–based printing press system. His newly devised hand mould made possible the precise and rapid creation of metal movable type in large quantities. Movable type had been hitherto unknown in Europe. In Europe, the two inventions, the hand mould and the printing press, together drastically reduced the cost of printing books and other documents, particularly in short print runs. The printing press spread within several decades to over two hundred cities in a dozen European countries. By 1500, printing presses in operation throughout Western Europe had already produced more than twenty million volumes. In the 16th century, with presses spreading further afield, their output rose tenfold to an estimated 150 to 200 million copies. The operation of a press became synonymous with the enterprise of printing, and lent its name to a new medium of expression and communication, "the press".In Renaissance Europe, the arrival of mechanical movable type printing introduced the era of mass communication, which permanently altered the structure of society. The relatively unrestricted circulation of information and (revolutionary) ideas transcended borders, captured the masses in the Reformation and threatened the power of political and religious authorities. The sharp increase in literacy broke the monopoly of the literate elite on education and learning and bolstered the emerging middle class. Across Europe, the increasing cultural self-awareness of its peoples led to the rise of proto-nationalism, and accelerated by the development of European vernacular languages, to the detriment of Latin's status as lingua franca. In the 19th century, the replacement of the hand-operated Gutenberg-style press by steam-powered rotary presses allowed printing on an industrial scale.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Organ printing | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_printing 00:01:54 1 History 00:04:08 2 3D printing techniques 00:05:35 2.1 Drop-based bioprinting (Inkjet) 00:06:36 2.2 Extrusion bioprinting 00:07:33 3 Printing materials 00:10:23 4 Organ structures 00:10:52 4.1 Vascularization 00:12:56 4.2 Cell sources Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7632108516702946 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A printable organ is an artificially constructed device designed for organ replacement, produced using 3D printing techniques. The primary use of printable organs is in transplantation. Research is currently being conducted on artificial heart, kidney, and liver structures, as well as other major organs. For more complicated organs, such as the heart, smaller constructs such as heart valves have also been the subject of research. Some printed organs are approaching functionality requirements for clinical implementation, and primarily include hollow structures such as the bladder, as well as vascular structures such as urine tubes.3D printing allows layer-by-layer construction of a particular organ structure to form a cell scaffold. This can be followed by the process of cell seeding, which cells of interest are pipetted directly onto the scaffold structure. Additionally, the process of integrating cells into the printable material itself, instead of performing seeding afterwards, has been explored.Modified inkjet printers have been used to produce three-dimensional biological tissue. Printer cartridges are filled with a suspension of living cells and a smart gel, the latter used for providing structure. Alternating patterns of the smart gel and living cells are printed using a standard printing nozzle, with cells eventually fusing together to form tissue. When completed, the gel is cooled and washed away, leaving behind only living cells.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Woodblock printing - Wikipedia Article Audio
 
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This is an audio version of a Wikipedia article created for the benefit of those who have vision problems or problem reading at night. This Wikipedia article audio was created under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike. To view the original article, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/[AUDIO_TITLE].
Views: 0 Wikipedia Audio
SimpleWiki: Printing press
 
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License: CC-BY-SA 3.0 Unported. Article Source: https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki?curid=32435
Views: 0 Simple Wiki
What is DIGITAL PRINTING? What does DIGITAL PRINTING mean? DIGITAL PRINTING meaning & explanation
 
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What is DIGITAL PRINTING? What does DIGITAL PRINTING mean? DIGITAL PRINTING meaning - DIGITAL PRINTING definition - DIGITAL PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Digital printing refers to methods of printing from a digital-based image directly to a variety of media. It usually refers to professional printing where small-run jobs from desktop publishing and other digital sources are printed using large-format and/or high-volume laser or inkjet printers. Digital printing has a higher cost per page than more traditional offset printing methods, but this price is usually offset by avoiding the cost of all the technical steps required to make printing plates. It also allows for on-demand printing, short turnaround time, and even a modification of the image (variable data) used for each impression. The savings in labor and the ever-increasing capability of digital presses means that digital printing is reaching the point where it can match or supersede offset printing technology's ability to produce larger print runs of several thousand sheets at a low price. The greatest difference between digital printing and traditional methods such as lithography, flexography, gravure, or letterpress is that there is no need to replace printing plates in digital printing, whereas in analog printing the plates are repeatedly replaced. This results in quicker turnaround time and lower cost when using digital printing, but typically a loss of some fine-image detail by most commercial digital printing processes. The most popular methods include inkjet or laser printers that deposit pigment or toner onto a wide variety of substrates including paper, photo paper, canvas, glass, metal, marble, and other substances. In many of the processes, the ink or toner does not permeate the substrate, as does conventional ink, but forms a thin layer on the surface that may be additionally adhered to the substrate by using a fuser fluid with heat process (toner) or UV curing process (ink). Fine art digital inkjet printing is printing from a computer image file directly to an inkjet printer as a final output. It evolved from digital proofing technology from Kodak, 3M, and other major manufacturers, with artists and other printers trying to adapt these dedicated prepress proofing machines to fine-art printing. There was experimentation with many of these types of printers, the most notable being the IRIS printer, initially adapted to fine-art printing by programmer David Coons, and adopted for fine-art work by Graham Nash at his Nash Editions printing company in 1991. Initially, these printers were limited to glossy papers, but the IRIS Graphics printer allowed the use of a variety of papers that included traditional and non-traditional media. The IRIS printer was the standard for fine art digital printmaking for many years, and is still in use today, but has been superseded by large-format printers from other manufacturers such as Epson and HP that use fade-resistant, archival inks (pigment-based, as well as newer solvent-based inks), and archival substrates specifically designed for fine-art printing. Substrates in fine art inkjet printmaking include traditional fine-art papers such as Rives BFK, Arches watercolor paper, treated and untreated canvas, experimental substrates (such as metal and plastic), and fabric. For artists making reproductions of their original work, inkjet printing is more expensive on a per-print basis than the traditional four-color offset lithography, but with inkjet printing the artist does not have to pay for the expensive printing-plate setup or the marketing and storage needed for large four-color offset print runs. Inkjet reproductions can be printed and sold individually in accordance with demand. Inkjet printing has the added advantage of allowing artists to take total control of the production of their images, including the final color correction and the substrates being used, with some artists owning and operating their own printers. Digital inkjet printing also allows for the output of digital art of all types as finished pieces or as an element in a further art piece. Experimental artists often add texture or other media to the surface of a final print, or use it as part of a mixed-media work. Many terms for the process have been used over the years, including "digigraph" and "giclée". Thousands of print shops and digital printmakers now offer services to painters, photographers, and digital artists around the world.
Views: 8942 The Audiopedia
Organ printing - Wikipedia Article Audio
 
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This is an audio version of a Wikipedia article created for the benefit of those who have vision problems or problem reading at night. This Wikipedia article audio was created under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike. To view the original article, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/[AUDIO_TITLE].
Views: 1 Wikipedia Audio
3D printing - Wikipedia Article Audio
 
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This is an audio version of a Wikipedia article created for the benefit of those who have vision problems or problem reading at night. This Wikipedia article audio was created under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike. To view the original article, go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/[AUDIO_TITLE].
Views: 0 Wikipedia Audio
Woodcut Relief Printing by Lianna Lukimto
 
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Have you ever heard about woodcut printing? Woodcut is a relief printing technique in printmaking. This technique is very old and has been practiced in Europe as well as in the Far East. Please read the article in Wikipedia if you‘re interested in the details. Are you curious how it works? Let‘s do some fun woodcut printing! At first you need a motif. I did do lots of thinking which motif is suitable for beginner. My thought just came to leaves. The structures of leaves are simple to cut on a wood block and yet they are naturally beautiful. I chose „Monstera deliciosa“ for this inspiration page. Their asymetrical distribution of the leaves are very beautiful and makes every leaf very unique. Read more at www.overjoyed.xyz Inspiration page!
2019-02-03 | Informational | Printing
 
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This week, I talk about how books are printed and bound! With a really cool example! Tor article: https://www.tor.com/2012/12/13/a-memory-of-light-being-printed-step-by-step/ A cool Tor article about the cover proofs: https://www.tor.com/2012/07/18/printing-the-a-memory-of-light-sales-proof/ Wikipedia about Deckled Edges: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deckle Starsight: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/0399555811/ UK Starsight: https://www.bookdepository.com/Starsight-Brandon-Sanderson/9781473217898 Email: [email protected]
WebScrapping With Python urllib BeautifulSoup Extract Wikipedia Page links
 
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This video will explain how to extract wiki links from wikipedia page. from urllib2 import urlopen from bs4 import BeautifulSoup import re url = "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page" html = urlopen(url) bs = BeautifulSoup(html, "lxml") links = bs.find("div",{"id" : "bodyContent"}).findAll("a" , href=re.compile("(/wiki/)+([A-Za-z0-9_:()])+")) for link in links: print(link['title'], link['href'])
Views: 10613 MyStudy
What is CLOUD PRINTING? What does CLOUD PRINTING mean? CLOUD PRINTING meaning & explanation
 
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What is CLOUD PRINTING? What does CLOUD PRINTING mean? CLOUD PRINTING meaning - CLOUD PRINTING definition - CLOUD PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cloud printing is the technology that enables printers to be accessed over a network through cloud computing. There are, in essence, two kinds of cloud printing. On the one hand, consumer-based cloud printing connects any application to cloud-enabled home printers that people own or have access to. Using this technology, people can take digital media as their primary communications tool and create a printed page only when they need the content in a physical form. On the other hand, professional cloud printing enables publishers, companies and content owners to print their digital publications by leveraging networks of production facilities through cloud computing technology. In short, professional cloud printing allows for the "ad-hoc transformation of digital information into physical forms in 2D or 3D." For consumers, cloud ready printers eliminate the need for PC connections and print drivers, enabling them to print from mobile devices. As for publishers and content owners, cloud printing allows them to "avoid the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware, software and processes" required for the production of professional print products. Leveraging cloud print for print on demand also allows businesses to cut down on the costs associated with mass production. Moreover, cloud printing can be considered more eco-friendly, as it significantly reduces the amount of paper used and lowers carbon emissions from transportation. Only a handful of providers are currently working towards a professional cloud print solution. Most of these operate in their own niche or focus on mobile devices. Significantly large steps have also been taken in the consumer market with Google Cloud Print. A few leading companies like Konica Minolta, Xerox and Ricoh followed in Google’s footsteps with their mobile cloud solutions, while Hewlett-Packard implemented a similar mechanism with their ePrint solution. Additionally, independent software vendors like Printix are leveraging cloud computing technology to offer cloud-based print infrastructure and cloud-based printing software as a Service (SaaS). These solutions may have integrations to cloud enabled printers or provide printing via the cloud features, which allow users to print between networks to printers which are on an isolated network or otherwise not reachable from the user’s computer. Industry experts believe that as these services become more popular, users will no longer consider printers as necessary assets but rather as devices that they can access on demand when the need to generate a printed page presents itself. While these cloud printing options do simplify the printing process, all the print data must travel through the public cloud as it makes its journey from device to printer.
Views: 286 The Audiopedia
What is SANDWICH PRINTING? What does SANDWICH PRINTING mean? SANDWICH PRINTING meaning
 
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What is SANDWICH PRINTING? What does SANDWICH PRINTING mean? SANDWICH PRINTING meaning - SANDWICH PRINTING definition - SANDWICH PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Sandwich printing is a non-digital photographic technique which combines two negatives or transparencies into a single image. "Sandwiching" may be accomplished by putting one original image on top of the other, placing them into the film carrier of an enlarger, and printing on one sheet of paper. It may also be accomplished by placing the two "sandwiched" originals in a frame on the surface of a lightbox and taking a third photograph of the combination. Sandwich printing is generally used to create a combination of image elements that would not occur naturally in the world. This technique may be used with either black and white or color images. When film negatives are used, one image will appear in the shadows of the other image. This occurs as a result of the shadow areas being less dense than the highlighted areas of a negative. The more underexposed the shadows, the more clearly the image from the other negative will shine through. The opposite occurs when using transparencies. The darker area of one image appears in the highlighted and pale areas of the other image.
Views: 392 The Audiopedia
What is 3D PRINTING? What does 3D PRINTING mean? 3D PRINTING meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is 3D PRINTING? What does 3D PRINTING mean? 3D PRINTING meaning - 3D PRINTING definition - 3D PRINTING explanation Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), refers to processes used to synthesize a three-dimensional object in which successive layers of material are formed under computer control to create an object. Objects can be of almost any shape or geometry and are produced from digital model data 3D model or another electronic data source such as an Additive Manufacturing File (AMF) file. Futurologist Jeremy Rifkin claimed that 3D printing or AM signals the beginning of a third industrial revolution, succeeding the production line assembly that dominated manufacturing starting in the late 19th century. The term 3D printing has its origin sense, 3D printing in reference to a process that deposits a binder material onto a powder bed with inkjet printer heads layer by layer. More recently, the term is being used in popular vernacular to encompass a wider variety of additive manufacturing techniques. United States and global Technical standards use the official term additive manufacturing for this broader sense. ISO/ASTM52900-15 defines seven categories of AM processes within its meaning: Binder Jetting, Directed Energy Deposition, Material Extrusion, Material Jetting, Powder Bed Fusion, Sheet Lamination and Vat Photopolymerization. 3D printable models may be created with a computer-aided design (CAD) package, via a 3D scanner, or by a plain digital camera and photogrammetry software. 3D printed models created with CAD result in reduced errors and can be corrected before printing, allowing verification in the design of the object before it is printed. The manual modeling process of preparing geometric data for 3D computer graphics is similar to plastic arts such as sculpting. 3D scanning is a process of collecting digital data on the shape and appearance of a real object, creating a digital model based on it. Before printing a 3D model from an STL file, it must first be examined for errors. Most CAD applications produce errors in output STL files: holes, faces normals, self-intersections, noise shells or manifold errors. A step in the STL generation known as "repair" fixes such problems in the original model. Generally STLs that have been produced from a model obtained through 3D scanning often have more of these errors. This is due to how 3D scanning works-as it is often by point to point acquisition, reconstruction will include errors in most cases. Once completed, the STL file needs to be processed by a piece of software called a "slicer," which converts the model into a series of thin layers and produces a G-code file containing instructions tailored to a specific type of 3D printer (FDM printers). This G-code file can then be printed with 3D printing client software (which loads the G-code, and uses it to instruct the 3D printer during the 3D printing process). Printer resolution describes layer thickness and X-Y resolution in dots per inch (dpi) or micrometers (µm). Typical layer thickness is around 100 µm (250 DPI), although some machines can print layers as thin as 16 µm (1,600 DPI). X-Y resolution is comparable to that of laser printers. The particles (3D dots) are around 50 to 100 µm (510 to 250 DPI) in diameter. Construction of a model with contemporary methods can take anywhere from several hours to several days, depending on the method used and the size and complexity of the model. Additive systems can typically reduce this time to a few hours, although it varies widely depending on the type of machine used and the size and number of models being produced simultaneously. Traditional techniques like injection moulding can be less expensive for manufacturing polymer products in high quantities, but additive manufacturing can be faster, more flexible and less expensive when producing relatively small quantities of parts. 3D printers give designers and concept development teams the ability to produce parts and concept models using a desktop size printer. Seemingly paradoxically, more complex objects can be cheaper for 3D printing production than less complex objects.
Views: 753 The Audiopedia
What is RELIEF PRINTING? What does RELIEF PRINTING mean? RELIEF PRINTING meaning & explanation
 
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What is RELIEF PRINTING? What does RELIEF PRINTING mean? RELIEF PRINTING meaning - RELIEF PRINTING definition - RELIEF PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Relief printing is a process where protruding surface faces of the printing plate or block are inked; recessed areas are ink free. Printing the image is therefore a relatively simple matter of inking the face of the matrix and bringing it in firm contact with the paper. A printing-press may not be needed as the back of the paper can be rubbed or pressed by hand with a simple tool such as a brayer or roller. The matrix in relief printing is classically created by starting with a flat original surface, and then removing (e.g., by carving) away areas intended to print white. The remaining areas of the original surface receive the ink. The relief family of techniques includes woodcut, metalcut, wood engraving, relief etching, linocut, rubber stamp, foam printing, potato printing, and some types of collagraph. Traditional text printing with movable type is also a relief technique. This meant that woodcuts were much easier to use as book illustrations, as they could be printed together with the text. Intaglio illustrations, such as engravings, had to be printed separately. Relief printing is one of the traditional families of printmaking techniques, along with the intaglio and planographic families. Modern developments have created other types. In contrast, in the intaglio process the recessed areas are the printed areas. The whole matrix is inked, and the ink then wiped away from the surface, so that it remains only in the recesses. Much greater pressure is then needed to force the paper into the channels containing the ink, and a high-pressure press will normally be required. Intaglio techniques include engraving, etching, and drypoint. With planographic techniques, such as lithography, the entire surface of the matrix is flat, and some areas are treated to create the print image. Normally relief and intaglio techniques can only be mixed with others of the same family in the same work.
Views: 2035 The Audiopedia
Wikipedia Book Creator
 
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How to create custom books using Wikipedia articles, and then download the books in PDF or ODT format.
Views: 3740 palomaratrc
Making Wikipedia Books
 
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Did you know that you can create books from Wikipedia articles? PDF, OpenDocs or ePubs. Just collect your article and let Wikipedia do the rest.
Views: 659 Chris Betcher
Toxic Particles Spewed by 3D Printers
 
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Is your 3D printer killing you with it's toxic particles? Or is the media just trying to scare you for those sweet clicks? Or is it both? Who can you trust in times of doubt or uncertianty? Your friendly neighborhood 3D Printing Professor, that's who! Jump to 6:25 for the conclusion. Links from the video: https://blogs.cdc.gov/niosh-science-blog/2018/08/16/3d-printing/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_%26_Francis Unfortunately, I can't link the gizmodo article because the link has a naughty word, and YouTube may flag me if I do. Sorry. But here's a 3Ders article about the same thing. https://www.3ders.org/articles/20181113-new-study-details-toxic-particles-spewed-by-3d-printers-and-hidden-health-risk.html Be sure to like, subscribe, share and enjoy. 3D Printing Professor is made possible by YOU! https://www.3dpprofessor.com/support/ I'm social! https://discord.gg/rpwXqE5 https://twitter.com/3DPProfessor https://www.facebook.com/3DProfessor/ Buy the Beginner's Guide to the 3D Printing Galaxy on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2ws7OiT Shop at GearBest to support the channel: https://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits-c_11399/?lkid=10971453 Follow my other 3D printing adventures at: https://www.3dpprofessor.com Join the mailing list and never miss anything important: https://bit.ly/3DPPnews All music by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 4333 3D Printing Professor
The Shockingly Old Origin of the Fax Machine
 
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Check out my other channel TopTenz! https://www.youtube.com/user/toptenznet If you happen to like our videos and have a few bucks to spare to support our efforts, check out our Patreon page where we've got a variety of perks for our Patrons, including Simon's voice on your GPS and the ever requested Simon Whistler whistling package: https://www.patreon.com/TodayIFoundOut →Some of our favorites: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLR0XuDegDqP10d4vrztQ0fVzNnTiQBEAA →Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut?sub_confirmation=1 Follow Simon on social media: https://twitter.com/SimonWhistler https://www.instagram.com/simonwhistler/ Never run out of things to say at the water cooler with TodayIFoundOut! Brand new videos 7 days a week! More from TodayIFoundOut: Why is Pomp and Circumstance Played at Graduations? https://youtu.be/d8nEa48_bIE Why are School Buses Yellow and Why Dont They Have Seatbelts https://youtu.be/ThBAFND05ds?list=PLR0XuDegDqP0GESJ0DgpgTcThLJVEbFs8 In this video: Today, we mostly think of the fax machine as an outdated piece of technology. While there are still some uses for it in an office-setting, technological advances are sending the fax machines to the same pasture as pagers, land-line telephones, and disposable cameras. Even if this is the last we hear of the beeps and bops that echo as an incoming fax is transmitted, the fax machine had a very long life – an amazing 171 years to be exact. Yes, the fax machine was invented in 1843, before the Model-T was even a dream, before the telephone was invented, and even before the American Civil War broke out. Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2014/11/shockingly-old-history-fax-machine/ Sources: http://faxauthority.com/fax-history/ http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/fax/history-of-fax.htm http://books.google.com/books?id=prMAAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA268&lpg=PA268&dq=%E2%80%9CMr.+Bain%E2%80%99s+Electric+Printing+Telegraph,%E2%80%9D+Mechanics%27+Magazine&source=bl&ots=z-aI2BdkB5&sig=4nVVPa3FSMozVQ-zzrsPYc0aHTU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=_ftsVPynM5PdsATG9YHADw&ved=0CCcQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%E2%80%9CMr.%20Bain%E2%80%99s%20Electric%20Printing%20Telegraph%2C%E2%80%9D%20Mechanics'%20Magazine&f=false http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fax http://www.electricclockarchive.org/portals/0/publisheddocuments/Articles/Notes%20on%20Bain%20electric%20clocks,%20collated%20by%20John%20Hubert.pdf http://books.google.com/books?id=PzQRrlrySPIC&pg=PA84&lpg=PA84&dq=patent+dispute+Bain+and+Morse&source=bl&ots=9qUOYeG815&sig=_QYZ4vho8Bq8RWNII7-xP2SOIw4&hl=en&sa=X&ei=AhFtVKi0H-GIsQSf34KQAg&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAw#v=snippet&q=Bain&f=false http://books.google.com/books?id=IryMtwHHngIC&pg=PA1702&lpg=PA1702&dq=brief+history+of+fax+machine&source=bl&ots=syXmgaMraH&sig=t5VXD7-IyOsnT9kLpbV4eDrC3zE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=QMpsVJK3ErLIsQTX8YLoDQ&ved=0CEIQ6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=brief%20history%20of%20fax%20machine&f=false http://books.google.com/books?id=SnjGRDVIUL4C&printsec=frontcover&dq=Huurdeman&hl=en&sa=X&ei=phZtVM2rFsONsQSnkYGwBQ&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Caselli&f=false http://www.cclab.com/billhist.htm http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usbiography/b/alexanderbain.htm http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi2069.htm http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/27/business/yourmoney/27fax.html?_r=0
Views: 71538 Today I Found Out
What is PHOTO-QUALITY PRINTING? What does PHOTO-QUALITY PRINTING mean?
 
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What is PHOTO-QUALITY PRINTING? What does PHOTO-QUALITY PRINTING mean? PHOTO-QUALITY PRINTING meaning - PHOTO-QUALITY PRINTING definition - PHOTO-QUALITY PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Photo quality printing is the ultra high resolution reproduction of digital artwork onto printable materials such as paper, vinyl, film, polyester, etc. The combination of graphic design utilizing high resolution images printed at ultra high line screen values defines the photo quality printing process. When designing for photo quality printing, graphic designers and printers start with high resolution images of 2400 dpi or higher. Traditional full color non-photo quality printing is done from images of 1200 dpi or less. Photo quality printing requires images to contain the most amount of color information possible. The high resolution images used in photo quality printing is saved in a CMYK file format to best utilize either the commercial printing process or inkjet printing photo quality output capabilities. CMYK dots of Cyan (blue), Magenta (red), Yellow, and Black are placed next to each other in specific patterns that trick the eye into seeing millions of colors. Photo quality inkjet printing transfers 4 or more toner colors to the substrate in a single cycle through the printer. In photo quality commercial printing each color of ink is applied separately. The high resolution photos are printed (or output) at a line screen value of 1200 lines per inch. Traditional full color printing is done at a line screen ranging from 300 to 600 lpi. The resulting photo quality output is apparent to the naked eye and by using a micrometer. The output includes more dots of ink or toner within each square inch output - and - truer color values and hues due to the greater amount of color information stored in the high resolution image or artwork file. Commercial photo quality printing uses a web or sheet fed press that may consist of multiple units. The file to be printed is imaged directly onto a drum on the press or onto photographic printing plates. The drum or plates transfer ink to the paper. Photo quality printing on a desktop printer usually uses some type of inkjet or laser printer. The inkjet printer has ink cartridges that place the ink directly on the paper. These are self-contained units connected to a computer through cables.
Views: 43 The Audiopedia
What is VARIABLE DATA PRINTING? What does VARIABLE DATA PRINTING mean?
 
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What is VARIABLE DATA PRINTING? What does VARIABLE DATA PRINTING mean? VARIABLE DATA PRINTING meaning - VARIABLE DATA PRINTING definition - VARIABLE DATA PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Variable–data printing (VDP) (also known as variable–information printing (VIP) or variable imaging (VI)) is a form of digital printing, including on-demand printing, in which elements such as text, graphics and images may be changed from one printed piece to the next, without stopping or slowing down the printing process and using information from a database or external file. For example, a set of personalized letters, each with the same basic layout, can be printed with a different name and address on each letter. Variable data printing is mainly used for direct marketing, customer relationship management, advertising, invoicing and applying addressing on selfmailers, brochures or postcard campaigns. VDP is a direct outgrowth of digital printing, which harnesses computer databases and digital print devices and highly effective software to create high-quality, full color documents, with a look and feel comparable to conventional offset printing. Variable data printing enables the mass customization of documents via digital print technology, as opposed to the 'mass-production' of a single document using offset lithography. Instead of producing 10,000 copies of a single document, delivering a single message to 10,000 customers, variable data printing could print 10,000 unique documents with customized messages for each customer. The returns for variable printing vary from double the normal return at the basic level to 10–15 times the return for fully variable jobs. This naturally depends on content and the relevancy of that content, but the technique presents an effective tool for increasing ROI on marketing campaigns. There are several levels of variable printing. The most basic level involves changing the salutation or name on each copy much like mail merge. More complicated variable data printing uses 'versioning', where there may be differing amounts of customization for different markets, with text and images changing for groups of addresses based upon which segment of the market is being addressed. Finally there is full variability printing, where the text and images can be altered for each individual address. All variable data printing begins with a basic design that defines static elements and variable fields for the pieces to be printed. While the static elements appear exactly the same on each piece, the variable fields are filled in with text or images as dictated by a set of application and style rules and the information contained in the database. There are three main operational methodologies for variable data printing. In one methodology, a static document is loaded into printer memory. The printer is instructed, through the print driver or Raster Image Processor (RIP) to always print the static document when sending any page out to the printer driver or RIP. Variable data can then be printed on top of the static document. This methodology is the simplest way to execute VDP, however its capability is less than that of a typical mail merge. A second methodology is to combine the static and variable elements into print files, prior to printing, using standard software. This produces a conventional (and potentially huge) print file with every image being merged into every page. A shortcoming of this methodology is that running many very large print files can overwhelm the RIP’s processing capability. When this happens, printing speeds might become slow enough to be impractical for a print job of more than a few hundred pages. A third methodology is to combine the static and variable elements into print files, prior to printing, using specialized VDP software. This produces optimized print files, such as PDF/VT, PostScript or PPML, that maximize print speed since the RIP only needs to process static elements once.
Views: 1534 The Audiopedia
What is DUPLEX PRINTING? What does DUPLEX PRINTING mean? DUPLEX PRINTING meaning & explanation
 
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What is DUPLEX PRINTING? What does DUPLEX PRINTING mean? DUPLEX PRINTING meaning - DUPLEX PRINTING definition - DUPLEX PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Duplex printing is a feature of some computer printers and multi-function printers (MFPs) that allows the printing of a sheet of paper on both sides automatically. Print devices without this capability can only print on a single side of paper, sometimes called single-sided printing or simplex printing. Consumer and low-to-medium volume office printers use a duplexing unit that reverses a piece of paper after the first side has been printed. Duplex multifunction printers that also support duplex scanning have a reversing automatic document feeder (RADF) for scanning both sides. Higher volume printers may effectively have two print engines in a single device, and are able to print both sides of the paper in a single pass. Duplex print devices, depending on options, software, and printer settings, can print single-sided page to single-sided page (1:1) or double-sided page to double-sided page (2:2). Many can also combine single-sided pages into a double-sided page format (1:2). Double-sided booklet formats (2:2 with a center fold) are also available, depending on optional outputs from the printer. Duplexed documents can be printed to be bound on either the short edge or the long edge. This functionality is mostly available on printers that come with a duplexer. Long edge binding in portrait mode allows pages to be turned side-to-side like a book. Short-edge binding allows the pages to be oriented correctly if they are flipped vertically, as in a notepad. This second form of printing/binding is sometimes known as "tumble." If the printing is done in landscape mode, these concepts are transposed since the print direction is different. Single-sided printers can print both sides of the paper by manually removing and turning over a stack of sheets after one side is printed; however, the user has to manually turn the print job over and re-initialize the printing of the document, with care to ensure that the order and orientation is correct. In commercial printing (books, magazines, newspapers, etc.), the term applied to imparting an image to both sides of the substrate at the same time is 'perfecting' and is commonly achieved—especially in lithography—by passing the substrate through a perfecting drum, thus turning the sheet over after the first side is printed. The turned sheet then continues its way through the press, being gripped at the opposite edge whilst the second side is printed. This in effect tumbles the job; therefore, accurate sheet sizing is necessary to ensure accurate backing up of the job. Some printers only support duplexing if an optional attachment is fitted.
Views: 4183 The Audiopedia
SimpleWiki: Printing
 
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License: CC-BY-SA 3.0 Unported. Article Source: https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki?curid=38855
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3D Printed Guns (Documentary)
 
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Like VICE News? Subscribe to our news channel: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out more episodes of Motherboard here: http://bit.ly/1nDXJJ5 Cody R Wilson has figured out how to print a semi-automatic rifle from the comfort of his own home. Now he's putting all the information online so that others will join him. -- This is a story about the rapid evolution of a technology that has forced the American legal system to play catch up. Cody Wilson, a 25 year old University of Texas Law student, is an advocate for the open source production of firearms using 3D printing technology. This makes him a highly controversial figure on both sides of the gun control issue. MOTHERBOARD sat down with Cody in Austin, Texas to talk about the constitution, the legal system, and to watch him make and test-fire a 3D-printed gun. Check out our podcast with Cody here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Podcast-Cody-Wilson Produced By Erin Lee Carr Edited by Chris O'Coin Read more on MOTHERBOARD here: http://motherboard.vice.com/read/click-print-gun-the-inside-story-of-the-3d-printed-gun-movement-video To find out more about what the ATF says about 3D-printed guns, read this: http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/the-atf-is-unconvinced-3d-guns-compare-to-real-thing Music Credits: "Darkness IV," "Nights" -- Matt Scholey "Metronome" -- Machew "Stillpoint" -- Orphx (Richard Oddie and Christina Sealey) "Lost Again" -- Orphx "Apparition" -- Orphx "The Leaves Had a Voice" -- The Supercomputer Six Thousand "Spaces 3" -- Jon Cooper "Extreme Prejudice" -- Andromeda Dreaming "Dreaming in the Face of Disaster" -- Deadhorse "Hearts of Glass" -- Brightspark! Check out the Best of VICE here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Best-Of Subscribe to VICE here! http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
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[Wikipedia] Print Quarterly
 
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Print Quarterly is an international academic journal devoted to the history and art of printmaking, from its origins to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It is published in London four times a year, in March, June, September, and December. It was founded in 1984 by the scholar, patron of the arts and business man David Landau, who served as editor for twenty-eight years. The current editor Rhoda Eitel-Porter joined the staff of the periodical in September 2010. The journal’s editorial board comprises notable academics and curators working in prints history and the graphic arts.The journal publishes recent scholarship on all things related to prints. It covers the Western tradition in the graphic arts as well as Asian, Latin-American and African printmaking. Articles consider the role and import of the print from a number of perspectives including those of social and cultural history, iconography, biography, and collecting. Reviews of recent books related to the graphic arts and of catalogues of exhibitions of works on paper are also included. Recent contributions have treated such diverse subjects as Francesco Salviati, the influence of a seventeenth-century fencing manual, Jean-Étienne Liotard, a quiz on an unidentified etching, the collector Pierre-Jean Mariette, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Whistler, Soviet and Vietnamese posters, Jim Dine, comic strips, Ad Reinhardt, William Kentridge and digital prints. The content lists for each volume from 1984 to 2009 are published online and can be searched at the journal’s website, http://www.printquarterly.com, and through the Getty Research Institute's Bibliography for the History of Art.
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What is SPARK PRINTING? What does SPARK PRINTING mean? SPARK PRINTING meaning & explanation
 
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What is SPARK PRINTING? What does SPARK PRINTING mean? SPARK PRINTING meaning - SPARK PRINTING definition - SPARK PRINTING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Spark printing is an obsolete form of computer printing and before that fax and chart recorder printing which uses a special paper coated with a conductive layer over a contrasting backing, originally black carbon over white paper but later aluminium over black paper. Printing on this paper uses pulses of electric current to burn away spots of the conductive layer. Typically, one or more electrodes are swept across the page perpendicular to the direction of paper motion to form a raster of potential burnt spots. Western Union developed the paper for this printing technology in the late 1940s, under the trademark "Teledeltos". The Western Union "Deskfax" fax machine, announced in 1948, was one of the first printers to use this technology. Spark printing was a simple and inexpensive technology. The print quality was relatively poor, but at a time when conventional printers cost hundreds of pounds, spark printers' sub-L100 price was a major selling point. The other major downside is that they can only print onto special metallised paper; such paper is no longer readily available. The Sinclair ZX Printer, introduced in November 1981 for the low-end ZX81 (and later for the ZX Spectrum) home computers used the spark printing method, and retailed for GBL49.95. In the early 1980s, Casio released a "Mini Electro Printer", the FP-10 for some of their scientific calculators. The Hewlett Packard 9120A, which attached to the top of the HP-9100A/B calculator, also used the sparking technique. A different spark printer implementation propelled dry toner from a tiny hole in the end of a glass rod, using a high-voltage spark between the platen and print head. The glass toner rod held a solid mass of toner, pushed toward the ejection tip by a spring. This had the advantage of printing onto plain paper, but the disadvantage of the toner not being cured to the paper, and thus easily smudged. Unlike the Sinclair printer, this printer had only one stylus (the toner rod), since the entire platen behind the paper served as the other spark electrode. The printer could only print one line of pixels at a time.
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American Printing House for the Blind | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: American Printing House for the Blind 00:00:21 1 History 00:02:26 2 Federal Funding 00:04:37 3 Talking Books 00:05:51 4 Campus 00:06:53 5 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) is an American non-for-profit corporation in Louisville, Kentucky promoting independent living for people who are blind and visually impaired. For over 150 years APH has created unique products and services to support all aspects of daily life without sight.
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