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Mortgage-backed securities I | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Part I of the introduction to mortgage-backed securities. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/mort-backed-secs-tut/v/mortgage-backed-securities-ii?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/mort-backed-secs-tut/v/mortgage-back-security-overview?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: In many commodities markets, it is very helpful for buyers or sellers to lock-in future prices. This is what both forwards and futures allow for. This tutorial explains how they work and what the difference is between the two. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 464650 Khan Academy
How Does the Bond Market Affect Mortgage Rates?
 
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Providence Home Lending provides resources for people who are buying a home or want to refinance their mortgage purchase or home. We learn more about how Providence Home Lending can aid with the refinancing process. Plus, more on what is happening in the bond market, and how it reflects what's happening in the U.S. economy. Head to www.trustprovidence.com for more information.
Views: 1346 TODAY’S TMJ4
The Bank of Canada Is Now Buying Canada Mortgage Bonds What it Means for Canadian Real Estate
 
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The Canada 2/5 bond inverted last week, the first time doing so since 2007. A flat or inverted yield curve is when short term rates exceed long-term rates. This is often taken as a signal that investors are more optimistic about short-term prospects versus the long term, suggesting a lack of confidence in continued economic growth. This can also impact bank profitability, as banks pay short-term rates on deposits and take in long-term rates on loans. A flat or inverted yield curve, therefore, could lead to negative net interest margins. In simpler terms, this can cause bank lending to further tighter, leaving borrowers high and dry when market liquidity is most needed. Meanwhile, the Bank of Canada purchased Canada Housing Trust bonds for the first time earlier this week, scooping up C$250 million of the federal agency’s C$5.5 billion five-year notes. The Bank of Canada stated earlier they would only be buyers if investor appetite wasn't sufficient. So their recent purchase should raise some eyebrows. While the bank says this move is merely for normal management of their balance sheet the timing is rather interesting. Expect to see the Bank of Canada ramp up purchasing in the event housing continues to move sideways. The purpose of this is to help with market liquidity and to stabilize borrowing costs. After the US housing crisis the US Federal Reserve purchased nearly $2T worth of Mortgage Backed Securities. The Bank of Canada won't have the same ability without destroying the currency. https://vancitycondoguide.com/vancouver-debt-to-income-new-high/
Views: 14366 Steve Saretsky
Mortgage Bonds 101
 
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What do these weird Charts mean? Learn here. Mortgage bonds go up and down every day. Learn how they impact the rate and points you get on your mortgage.
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 574280 Khan Academy
What is a Mortgage Backed Security?
 
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Do you have a MERS Mortgage? Go to : http://www.ismersinyourmortgage.com/ for a FREE INTRO COPY! Do you know what happened to your mortgage at the closing table? A mortgage-backed security (MBS) is a securitized interest in a pool of mortgages. It is a bond. Instead of paying investors fixed coupons and principal, it pays out the cash flows from the pool of mortgages. The simplest form of mortgage-backed security is a mortgage pass-through. With this structure, all principal and interest payments (less a servicing fee) from the pool of mortgages are passed directly to investors each month.
Views: 46286 Richie
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 380869 Khan Academy
What is a mortgage bond?
 
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Mortgage rates, Daily market watch. If buying a home or auto need to know what market is doing, stock, treasuries, mortgage bonds. No credit, bad credit or need credit repair call John Franco 661.310.1514 visit my blog at www.johnfranco.com
Views: 4432 John Franco
Opportunities in Mortgage-Backed Securities
 
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Daniel Hyman, co-head of PIMCO’s agency mortgage portfolio management team, and Alfred Murata, mortgage credit portfolio manager, discuss opportunities in mortgage-backed securities in light of the outlook for the U.S. housing market. For an extended discussion of our views on the U.S. housing market and opportunities in mortgage securities, please watch U.S. U.S. Mortgage Market Outlook for 2017: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lw4sPLYV_Kw Follow us for insights on economies, markets and investing: Twitter: https://twitter.com/pimco LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/pimco Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pimco Blog: http://blog.pimco.com Terms and conditions: pimco.com/socialmedia
Views: 3045 PIMCO
The 2008 Financial Crisis: Crash Course Economics #12
 
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Today on Crash Course Economics, Adriene and Jacob talk about the 2008 financial crisis and the US Goverment's response to the troubles. So, all this starts with home mortgages, and the use of mortgages as an investment instrument. For years, it seemed like the US housing market would go up and up. Like a bubble or something. It turns out it was a bubble. But not the good kind. And the government response was...interesting. Anyway, why are you reading this? Watch the video! More Financial Crisis Resources: Financial Crisis Inquiry Report: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/GPO-FCIC/pdf/GPO-FCIC.pdf TAL: Giant Pool of Money: http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/355/the-giant-pool-of-money Timeline of the crisis: https://www.stlouisfed.org/financial-crisis/full-timeline http://www.economist.com/news/schoolsbrief/21584534-effects-financial-crisis-are-still-being-felt-five-years-article Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1748330 CrashCourse
Fannie Mae's Role in Mortgage-Backed Securities
 
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What are mortgage-backed securities (MBS), and what's Fannie Mae's role with them? See what we have to do with mortgage finance. http://bit.ly/mortgagefinance
Views: 23314 Fannie Mae
How Do Mortgage Backed Securities Affect Mortgage Rates? (Mortgages, Home Loans, St. Louis, MO)
 
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http://firstintegrity.com/ Mortgage & home loan expert at First Integrity Mortgage Services in St. Louis, MO discusses Mortgage Backed Securities & Mortgage Rates? (800) 263-3959. There are a lot of things that can affect mortgage rates, but nothing affects them more directly than Mortgage Backed Securities like mortgage bonds. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are the leading purchasers of mortgages in the US. To fund these mortgages, they bundle them in large “pools”, securitize them as Mortgage Bonds and sell them on the secondary market. These pools are in the millions of dollars…sometimes even in the billions of dollars. Here is how it works: Let’s say you take out a mortgage at 4.25%. First Integrity Mortgage closes the loan and then we sell it to a large investor like Chase, BB&T, or any one of many others. That investor usually retains the servicing, or payment processing, of the loan but then sells the loan directly to Fannie or Freddie. So by the time Fannie or Freddie get the mortgage, a lot of people have to be paid along the way which eats into the yield. A 4.25% mortgage now has a final yield of about 3.25%. Now Fannie or Freddie have just purchased an asset that’s roughly yielding a 3.25% ROI, Return On Investment. But Fannie or Freddie don’t want to hang on to this asset…they want to sell it so they can lend out more money and make more profit…that’s what they DO. The solution is that they are going to securitize this loan by selling a bond with a yield of about 3.50%. This process nets them a profit of .25% PLUS they have now replenished their capital to fund more mortgages. The direct effect of Mortgage Bonds on mortgage rates is a simple economics 101 class lecture. As the demand for mortgage bonds increases, Fannie or Freddie can require a higher price at a lower yield. Inversely, as the demand for mortgage bonds decreases, Fannie and Freddie have to drop the price and increase the yield to attract more buyers. Mortgage rates move in the same direction of the yield of mortgage bonds, and in the opposite direction of mortgage bond prices. Mortgage Backed Securities are generally purchased by large Fund Managers, foreign governments, and even our own Federal Reserve. When facing uncertain or bad economic situations, these groups will seek out the safe haven of the bond market, pushing prices higher and yields lower…ECONOMICS 101, right? We hope this helps. Also, if you are interested in a consultation about PowerPlus, looking to compare mortgages, have a question about interest rates, or different homes loans like FHA or aVA loan or any other information to ensure you get the best home loan in Missouri or Illinois then we invite you to call the number below. Also, we encourage our subscribers to leave questions on any of our videos, and we will provide you with the answers you need. You can also find us online at firstintegrity.com.
What is a Mortgage Backed Security (MBS)?
 
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An overview of the financial product Mortgage Backed Security (MBS). Describes the traditional model of mortgage lending, and how that changed with the introduction of the MBS. I also provide a brief overview of what Securitization is, and how MBSes played into the 2008 crash. This is the first in a series of explainers on basic financial products.
Views: 54584 insidewallst
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 557846 Khan Academy
Mortgage-backed securities III | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Part III of the introduction to mortgage-backed securities. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/cdo-tutorial/v/collateralized-debt-obligation-overview?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/mort-backed-secs-tut/v/mortgage-backed-securities-ii?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: In many commodities markets, it is very helpful for buyers or sellers to lock-in future prices. This is what both forwards and futures allow for. This tutorial explains how they work and what the difference is between the two. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 241003 Khan Academy
Margin Call (2011) - Fire Sale of Mortgage Bonds (Wall Street Investment Bank Trading) [HD 1080p]
 
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"...so today looks like my loss is your gain."
Views: 1042406 Extractor
Mortgage-backed securities II | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Part II of the introduction to mortgage-backed securities. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/mort-backed-secs-tut/v/mortgage-backed-securities-iii?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/mort-backed-secs-tut/v/mortgage-backed-securities-i?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: In many commodities markets, it is very helpful for buyers or sellers to lock-in future prices. This is what both forwards and futures allow for. This tutorial explains how they work and what the difference is between the two. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 312210 Khan Academy
Mortgage Crisis Explained: Finance System, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Global Markets (2015)
 
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A mortgage-backed security (MBS) is a type of asset-backed security that is secured by a mortgage or collection of mortgages. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0990976300/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0990976300&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=59d18b8225ed6599b8b8050a523b67cc The mortgages are sold to a group of individuals (a government agency or investment bank) that securitizes, or packages, the loans together into a security that investors can buy. The mortgages of an MBS may be residential or commercial, depending on whether it is an Agency MBS or a Non-Agency MBS; in the United States they may be issued by structures set up by government-sponsored enterprises like Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, or they can be "private-label", issued by structures set up by investment banks. The structure of the MBS may be known as "pass-through", where the interest and principal payments from the borrower or homebuyer pass through it to the MBS holder, or it may be more complex, made up of a pool of other MBSs. Other types of MBS include collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs, often structured as real estate mortgage investment conduits) and collateralized debt obligations (CDOs).[1] The shares of subprime MBSs issued by various structures, such as CMOs, are not identical but rather issued as tranches (French for "slices"), each with a different level of priority in the debt repayment stream, giving them different levels of risk and reward. Tranches—especially the lower-priority, higher-interest tranches—of an MBS are/were often further repackaged and resold as collaterized debt obligations.[2] These subprime MBSs issued by investment banks were a major issue in the subprime mortgage crisis of 2006–8. The total face value of an MBS decreases over time, because like mortgages, and unlike bonds, and most other fixed-income securities, the principal in an MBS is not paid back as a single payment to the bond holder at maturity but rather is paid along with the interest in each periodic payment (monthly, quarterly, etc.). This decrease in face value is measured by the MBS's "factor", the percentage of the original "face" that remains to be repaid. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortgage-backed_security The Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA), commonly known as Fannie Mae, was founded in 1938 during the Great Depression as part of the New Deal. It is a government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) and has been a publicly traded company since 1968.[2] The corporation's purpose is to expand the secondary mortgage market by securitizing mortgages in the form of mortgage-backed securities (MBS),[3] allowing lenders to reinvest their assets into more lending and in effect increasing the number of lenders in the mortgage market by reducing the reliance on locally based savings and loan associations (aka "thrifts").[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Mae The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC), known as Freddie Mac, is a public government-sponsored enterprise (GSE), headquartered in the Tyson's Corner CDP in unincorporated Fairfax County, Virginia.[2][3] The FHLMC was created in 1970 to expand the secondary market for mortgages in the US. Along with Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac buys mortgages on the secondary market, pools them, and sells them as a mortgage-backed security to investors on the open market. This secondary mortgage market increases the supply of money available for mortgage lending and increases the money available for new home purchases. The name, "Freddie Mac", is a variant of the initialism of the company's full name that had been adopted officially for ease of identification. On September 7, 2008, Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) director James B. Lockhart III announced he had put Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac under the conservatorship of the FHFA (see Federal takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac). The action has been described as "one of the most sweeping government interventions in private financial markets in decades".[4][5][6] Moody's gave Freddie Mac's preferred stock an investment grade rating of A1 until August 22, 2008, when Warren Buffett said publicly that both Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae had tried to attract him and others. Moody's changed the credit rating on that day to Baa3, the lowest investment grade credit rating. Freddie's senior debt credit rating remains Aaa/AAA from each of the major ratings agencies Moody's, S&P, and Fitch.[7] As of the start of the conservatorship, the United States Department of the Treasury had contracted to acquire US$1 billion in Freddie Mac senior preferred stock, paying at a rate of 10% per year, and the total investment may subsequently rise to as much as US$100 billion. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freddie_Mac
Views: 22214 The Film Archives
The Big Short (2015) - Dr Michael Burry Analyzes Subprime Mortgage Backed Securities
 
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Smart money is invested in advance of the U.S. housing crash. A group of individuals always looking for opportunities make a fortune off of the U.S. 2008 economic crash. XXReport.com - We inform the public in percentage details about our investment portfolio. THE FREE MARKET, Cayman Islands, Hong Kong, Singapore GO GO GO GO GO GO!!!!!!!!! SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE YOUTUBE VIDEOS ▶︎ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-xwKApunO93S6vINGSmnYw?sub_confirmation=1 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ADD US: ★ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/xxreport/ ★ Twitter: https://twitter.com/xxreports ★ Tumblr: https://xxreport.tumblr.com/ ★ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/xxreport/ FOLLOW US ON: ★ OUR WEBSITE → https://www.xxreport.com
Views: 17971 The Big Short
Mortgage-backed security overview | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Basics of how a mortgage back security works. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/mort-backed-secs-tut/v/mortgage-backed-securities-i?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/forward-futures-contracts/v/interpretting-futures-fair-value-in-the-premarket?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: In many commodities markets, it is very helpful for buyers or sellers to lock-in future prices. This is what both forwards and futures allow for. This tutorial explains how they work and what the difference is between the two. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 84887 Khan Academy
What are Mortgages? | by Wall Street Survivor
 
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How to understand your mortgage. Mortgages exist to solve a problem. Most people want to buy their own home, but a house costs hundreds of thousands of dollars, and you likely don’t have that kind of cash lying around in the crevices of your sofa. You’d have to work and save for decades to get that much money, and in the meantime you could easily end up paying out more in rent than the cost of the house you wanted to buy. So to enable people to buy a house before they are too old to remember why they wanted it in the first place, we have the mortgage system. A mortgage is just a type of loan, pure and simple. If the house you want to buy costs $100,000, then you could pay $10,000 from your savings (that’s called the downpayment), and borrow the remaining $90,000 from the bank. So if it’s that simple – just a housing loan that you pay back over time – why all the fuss and complexity around mortgages? Well, mortgages come in more flavors than Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, and not all of them taste good. You’ve got ARMs and balloon mortgages, fixed-rate loans and interest-only loans, bridge loans and refis and reverse mortgages. Learn more about the different types of mortgages and find out which one is right for you with Wall Street Survivor's Paying For Your Home course:
Views: 325105 Wall Street Survivor
Mortgage Backed sector of bond market
 
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Mortgage Backed sector of bond market training by Vamsidhar Ambatipudi
Credit default swaps | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to credit default swaps. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/credit-default-swaps-tut/v/credit-default-swaps-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/derivative-securities/credit-default-swaps-tut/v/credit-default-swaps-cds-intro?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Interest is the basis of modern capital markets. Depending on whether you are lending or borrowing, it can be viewed as a return on an asset (lending) or the cost of capital (borrowing). This tutorial gives an introduction to this fundamental concept, including what it means to compound. It also gives a rule of thumb that might make it easy to do some rough interest calculations in your head. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 635782 Khan Academy
Bonds vs. stocks | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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The difference between a bond and a stock. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/shorting-stock/v/basic-shorting?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/stocks-intro-tutorial/v/what-it-means-to-buy-a-company-s-stock?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Many people own stocks, but, unfortunately, most of them don't really understand what they own. This tutorial will keep you from being one of those people (not keep you from owning stock, but keep you from being ignorant about your investments). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 921079 Khan Academy
Healthy Housing Market Making Mortgage Bonds Magnificent Says Fund Manager
 
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A healthy housing market is making mortgage-backed bonds all the more attractive, said Greg Parsons, CEO of Semper Capital Management. 'Economic metrics supporting the sector continue to move in the right direction, especially with home price appreciation around 5% and home prices back to 2006 levels with better home affordability,' said Parsons. Parsons' firm is behind the Semper MBS Total Return Fund , which received a 5-Star overall rating out of 247 nontraditional bond funds tracked by Morningstar. The Semper MBS Total Return Fund is up 4.3% thus far in 2016, according to Morningstar. The $476 million fund has returned an average of 7.1% annually over the past three years, outpacing 97% of its rivals Morningstar's nontraditional bond category. The fund sports a healthy trailing twelve month yield of 5.8%, according to Morningstar. Parsons sees strong risk adjusted returns in the structured credit markets, specifically non-agency residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS). He said the combination of strong fundamentals and technical dynamics will continue to support prices. In Parsons' view, structured credit offers a strong value proposition - both absolute and relative - within the bond market because it offers healthy interest income with limited exposure to global macro events, direction of interest rates, or credit risk. Based on Semper's analysis, structured credit should generate 5%-plus 'loss adjusted yield' with an anticipated effective duration of around 1.5 years. As a result, Parsons said RMBS makes for a strong compliment or substitute for traditional high yield in a portfolio. Parsons also pointed out that the quality of assets have materially improved since the mortgage meltdown in 2008, which should reassure investors that past excesses have been wrung out of the market. 'We know what we are buying now and our models are far more accurate,' said Parsons. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
Why US Agency Mortgage Backed Securities could be an opportunity
 
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The US agency mortgage-backed Securities (MBS) market is the world's second largest bond market after the US Treasuries market, making it one of the most liquid markets globally
Beat Bernanke With Mortgage Bonds
 
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Brad Friedlander, PM for the Angel Oak Multi-Strategy Income fund, says non-agency mortgage bonds are best for this Fed-dominated market.
⛔Canadian  Mortgage backed securities . Here we go!!
 
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Canada’s Central Bank Is Getting Ready To Provide Mortgage Liquidity Relax, everything’s fine. Or maybe it’s not. The Bank of Canada (BoC) quietly made plans to buy government backed mortgage bonds, last week. The move is designed to increase the bank’s assets, and arguably assist the housing market. That sounds great, until you realize how these things work. It’s a similar set-up to the one the US Federal Reserve created ten years ago.
Views: 733 Mike Martins
Harms Recommends Adjustable-Rate Agency Mortgage Bonds: Video
 
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Nov. 12 (Bloomberg) -- Christopher Harms, a fixed-income strategist at CapitalSource Finance LLC, talks with Bloomberg's Pimm Fox his investment strategy for agency mortgage bonds. (Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 150 Bloomberg
How the Mortgage Bond Market Works
 
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The Money Man Mike Show discusses how the bond market works.
Views: 14 Michael Thayer
Bond yields and Rates - The Mortgage Minute
 
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http://www.peterkinch.com Aug 31, 2011 What's the relationship between bond yields and rates and why dobank want you to start choosing long term interest rates? Could it have anything to do with their profit margins? This week's Mortgage Minute will explain the relationship between the two. We also annnounce a new contest - send in your questions.
Views: 794 Peter Kinch
Buying Mortgage-Backed Securities
 
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The Federal Reserve plans to phase out its program of buying mortgage backed-securities by the end of the first quarter of 2010. The mortgage finance market is being entirely supported by the government and its leaving the market could push up inter
Healthy Housing Market Making Non-Agency Mortgage Bonds More Attractive
 
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The housing market won't rise as much as last year, but it's still strong enough for investors in high quality non-agency residential mortgage backed bonds to do well, says Berkin Kologlu, portfolio manager for the Angel Oak Multi-Strategy Income Fund. Kologlu likes these better than agency bonds due to their lower durations. He also is positive on CLOs because corporate fundamentals are strong and these bonds work well in a rising rate environment. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
11. Institutions and Incentives in Mortgages and Mortgage-Backed Securities
 
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Capitalism: Success, Crisis and Reform (PLSC 270) Guest speaker Will Goetzmann, Director of the Yale International Center for Finance and professor at the Yale School of Management, provides a brief history of debt and financial crises. Professor Goetzmann begins with a discussion on debt slavery in the ancient world, and moves on to real estate financing in New York City. Professor Goetzmann also presents recent research by himself and others on the collapse of the real estate market. He explores the notion that the collapse of the mortgage market followed from the fallout of the larger financial crisis, rather than the other way around. Data on the real estate market is presented and discussed. Larger claims about responsibility of different players for the economic crisis are briefly assessed. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Financial History, with Will Goetzmann 24:20 - Chapter 2. Current Financial Crisis 26:56 - Chapter 3. Price Growth vs. Subprime Approvals 35:12 - Chapter 4. Estimating the Relationship between Past Growth and Future Growth in Mortgage Prices 40:27 - Chapter 5. 2006 Mortgage Regressions 45:44 - Chapter 6. Evidence for Three Demand Effects and Loan Level Likelihood of Approval Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
Views: 10675 YaleCourses
Mortgage Rundown: May 30, 2019
 
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Jason Obradovich, EVP of Capital Markets for New American Funding, is back with today's Mortgage Rundown. As trade tensions and growth concerns continue, the lack of confidence in the market has caused bond yields to fall. If no trade deal is reached soon, the pressure on the market will continue to grow which will put pressure on the federal reserve to lower interest rates for the first time since 2008. Watch the full video to get the scoop on what to expect and look out for in the next few weeks. To read more on Jason’s Market Update click here: http://www.newamericanagent.com/mortgage-rundown-may-30th-2019 ►Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3OsglK9jXigknWLbSVQzrA?sub_confirmation=1 Follow New American Funding: Web: http://www.NewAmericanFunding.com Blog/Press: http://www.newamericanagent.com/news-press.aspx Careers: http://www.newamericanfunding.com/careers/ Partners: http://newamericanpartner.com/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NewAmericanFunding Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newamericanfunding/ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/NewAmericanTeam LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/new-american-funding Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/newamericanteam For additional state licensing https://www.newamericanfunding.com/legal/state-licensing/ -- Hello everyone and welcome back to the Mortgage Rundown. Today we are going to talk about what’s happening with interest rates. If you’ve been following the market you are well aware that rates continue to drop since mid November of last year. In fact the 10yr treasury is down 100bps in rate from November 8th until today. Trade tensions are not going away, growth concerns continue to persist, home price appreciation beginning to level off and a lack of confidence in the market has bond yields falling. As you can see bond yields haven’t been this low since 2017. Currently the 10yr Treasury trades at a 2.22% yield and if it breaks below 2.05% then we could see it fall all the way to 1.75%. There is real fear in the market today, especially considering how low inflation is despite a very strong jobs market. One of the key recessionary signals we want to watch out for is the shape of the yield curve, which is the spread between the 3 month and 10yr treasury. When the yield curve inverts, that is to say that the yield on the 3 month is greater than the yield on the 10yr, then it’s the market signaling that growth is likely to be constrained and could possibly predict a recession coming in the next 18 months. Today the 3 month treasury bill yields 2.34% and the 10yr as I mentioned before is 2.22%. So the yield curve has inverted and that’s a signal of a possible recession ahead. A few days does not make a trend but it is something we will need to watch going forward. If the 10yr continues to trade below the 3 month treasury bill over the next 30 days then we could see interest rates continue to fall even further. Speaking of the federal reserve, the odds of a rate cut in 2019 are up to a staggering 87%. If no trade deal is reached soon, the pressure on the market will continue and that’s going to put pressure on the federal reserve to lower interest rates for the first time since 2008. In the coming weeks, you should keep an eye on the following items: • By and large the most important thing to watch is the 10yr treasury. If it holds below 2.3% then we could see rates continue to move lower over the next several months. If it pushes back above the 3 month treasury bill then rates may settle and move a little higher. • The trade war continues to plague the market and rates. If there isn’t a solution in the short term, fear could continue to drag rates lower and lower. That’s it everyone from the capital markets desk this week. Thank you all for watching and have a great day.
The Big Short (2015) - Shorts turn the tables on Wall Street [HD 1080p]
 
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"Sub-prime bonds fell off a cliff. Rumor has it default levels are huge." "It's happening..." "They are singing a different tune now aren't they?"
Views: 2233612 Extractor
Mortgage Rates Weekly Update March 3 2019
 
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Mortgage Rates Weekly Update for March 3, 2019. Watch for advice on Floating or Locking your mortgage rate to start the week. Call 302-703-0727 for a Rate Quote. Read the full story online at https://delawaremortgageloans.net/mortgage-rates-weekly-update-march-3-2019/ John Thomas with Primary Residential Mortgage in Newark, Delaware will review the mortgage bond chart to provide advice locking or floating your mortgage interest rate. Last week mortgage bonds sold off as the stock market rallied. See how it affected mortgage rates. John will also review the latest housing and financial news from the previous week. GDP for 2018 was released and was above expectations. In Housing news we saw pending home sales, New Construction Housing Starts and building permits. See how the housing market is doing and its effects on mortgage rates. Watch now! Follow Us at: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/PrimaryResid... Twitter - https://twitter.com/DEMortgages LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/delawarem... Google + - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/1118995... DE Mortgage Rates Delaware Mortgage Rate Delaware Mortgage Loans Lowest Delaware Mortgage Rates Current DE Mortgage Rates first time homebuyer program current Delaware mortgage rates mortgage rates https://youtu.be/9GLc7f9e75U John R. Thomas - Branch Manager Certified Mortgage Planner - NMLS 38783 Primary Residential Mortgage, Inc. 248 E Chestnut Hill Rd Newark, DE 19713 302-703-0727 Office Apply Online at http://www.PRMIClickApproval.com http://www.DelawareMortgageLoans.net Opinions expressed are solely my own and do not express the views of my employer Free Delaware First Time Home Buyer Seminar - http://www.DelawareHomeBuyerSeminar.com Free Maryland First Time Home Buyer Seminar - http://www.MarylandHomeBuyerSeminars.com PRMI NMLS 3094. Branch NMLS 106170. PRMI is an Equal Housing Lender. Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. Programs, rates, terms, and conditions are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification. This is not a commitment to lend. Licenses- Licensed by the Delaware State Bank Commissioner to engage in business in Delaware 5644 expires on 12/31/2017. Department of Financial Institutions Consumer Credit Division, First Lien License 11069 Secretary of State Securities Commission Second Lien License 103936. Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation Commissioner of Financial Regulation #5511. New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance. Pennsylvania Department of Banking 23206. Bureau of Financial Institutions: MC-2248 Broker MC-2248 NMLS # 3094 (http://nmlsconsumeraccess.org). Equal Housing Lender #DelawareMortgageRates #DelawareMortgageLoans #DelawareMortgages #JohnThomas #PrimaryResidentialMortgage #DelawareMortgageCompany #mortgagerate #DelawareHomeLoans #DelawareLoanOfficer #BragAboutYourLoanOfficer #johnthomasteam #mortgagerates
Views: 1582 John Thomas
How do mortgage bonds affect interest rates
 
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The Money Man Mike Show discusses mortgage bonds and how they affect interest rates.
Views: 12 Michael Thayer
FRM part1 Mortagages and Mortgage Backed Securities in Financial Markets and Products
 
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FRM Part 1 training at pacegurus by Vamsidhar Ambatipudi on Financial Markets and Products. For details call +91 9848012123
The Crisis of Credit Visualized - HD
 
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The Short and Simple Story of the Credit Crisis -- The Full Version By Jonathan Jarvis. Crisisofcredit.com The goal of giving form to a complex situation like the credit crisis is to quickly supply the essence of the situation to those unfamiliar and uninitiated. This is the original, full version.
Views: 2100183 graphixmdp
Mortgage Bond Market Analysis
 
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I discuss what's happening in the mortgage bond market and what to look for if earnings season is good. I give my recommendation about whether to lock or float.
Views: 2 Jed Wunderli
Forget Fannies and Freddies, Non-Agency Mortgage Bonds Much Better
 
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Non-Agency mortgage backed securities are superior to Fannies and Freddies in the current environment because they are less expensive and offer lower prepayment risk, says Brad Friedlander, portfolio manager for the Angel Oak Multi-Strategy fund. Friedlander says around 55% of his fund is in Non-Agency MBS, which will also perform well when interest rates eventually do rise. He says the housing market is steadily improving and home prices should rise at a nice clip in the coming year, helping the quality of the underlying mortgages. Finally, Friedlander is a fan of the credit protection provided by CLOs. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
What is MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITY? What does MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITY mean?
 
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What is MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITY? What does MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITY mean? MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITY meaning - MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITY definition - MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A mortgage-backed security (MBS) is a type of asset-backed security that is secured by a mortgage or collection of mortgages. The mortgages are sold to a group of individuals (a government agency or investment bank) that securitizes, or packages, the loans together into a security that investors can buy. The mortgages of an MBS may be residential or commercial, depending on whether it is an Agency MBS or a Non-Agency MBS; in the United States they may be issued by structures set up by government-sponsored enterprises like Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, or they can be "private-label", issued by structures set up by investment banks. The structure of the MBS may be known as "pass-through", where the interest and principal payments from the borrower or homebuyer pass through it to the MBS holder, or it may be more complex, made up of a pool of other MBSs. Other types of MBS include collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs, often structured as real estate mortgage investment conduits) and collateralized debt obligations (CDOs). The shares of subprime MBSs issued by various structures, such as CMOs, are not identical but rather issued as tranches (French for "slices"), each with a different level of priority in the debt repayment stream, giving them different levels of risk and reward. Tranches—especially the lower-priority, higher-interest tranches—of an MBS are/were often further repackaged and resold as collaterized debt obligations. These subprime MBSs issued by investment banks were a major issue in the subprime mortgage crisis of 2006–2008. The total face value of an MBS decreases over time, because like mortgages, and unlike bonds, and most other fixed-income securities, the principal in an MBS is not paid back as a single payment to the bond holder at maturity but rather is paid along with the interest in each periodic payment (monthly, quarterly, etc.). This decrease in face value is measured by the MBS's "factor", the percentage of the original "face" that remains to be repaid. There are many reasons for mortgage originators to finance their activities by issuing mortgage-backed securities. Mortgage-backed securities: 1. transform relatively illiquid, individual financial assets into liquid and tradable capital market instruments 2. allow mortgage originators to replenish their funds, which can then be used for additional origination activities 3. can be used by Wall Street banks to monetize the credit spread between the origination of an underlying mortgage (private market transaction) and the yield demanded by bond investors through bond issuance (typically a public market transaction) 4. are often a more efficient and lower-cost source of financing in comparison with other bank and capital markets financing alternatives. 5. allow issuers to diversify their financing sources by offering alternatives to more traditional forms of debt and equity financing 6. allow issuers to remove assets from their balance sheet, which can help to improve various financial ratios, utilize capital more efficiently, and achieve compliance with risk-based capital standards The high liquidity of most mortgage-backed securities means that an investor wishing to take a position need not deal with the difficulties of theoretical pricing described below; the price of any bond is essentially quoted at fair value, with a very narrow bid/offer spread. Reasons (other than investment or speculation) for entering the market include the desire to hedge against a drop in prepayment rates (a critical business risk for any company specializing in refinancing). Critics have suggested that the complexity inherent in securitization can limit investors' ability to monitor risks, and that competitive securitization markets with multiple securitizers may be particularly prone to sharp declines in underwriting standards. Private, competitive mortgage securitization is believed to have played an important role in the US subprime mortgage crisis. In addition, off–balance sheet treatment for securitizations coupled with guarantees from the issuer are said to make the securitizing firm's leverage less transparent, thereby facilitating risky capital structures and allowing credit risk underpricing. Off–balance sheet securitizations are believed to have played a large role in the high leverage ratio of US financial institutions before the financial crisis.
Views: 4141 The Audiopedia
How the Stock Market Affects Mortgage Interest Rates
 
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In this video you will learn the correlation between mortgage interest rates and the stock market. Money managers will invest in either the stock market or bond market. Stocks can have great returns, if you pick the right ones. Bonds are seen as a safer bet, you won't make a fortune but you also won't lose a fortune. When the stock market is down, people take their money out of stocks and invest in the attractive bond market. Resulting in an increase in interest rate in the bond market.
Views: 16 Kevin Berju
Mortgage backed securities (BSE)
 
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Subject: Business Economics Paper: Financial Market and Institutions Module: Mortgage backed securities (BSE) Content Writer:
Views: 720 Vidya-mitra
The VINE Rant: How Bond Yields Affect Mortgage Rates
 
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On December 18th, 2018, the Bank of Canada's 5-Year Benchmark Bond Yield broke a threshold point of just under 2%. As mortgage rates are backed by bond yields, we asked ourselves why is this happening and what does this mean for the average Canadian consumer heading into 2019.
Views: 214 Vine Group
The Mortgage Report - The Bond Market, Interest Rates and 4 Reasons to Buy Now
 
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The Mortgage Report for the week of 10.10.2016 goes over what's currently happening in the bond market, interest rate trends and 4 reasons why now is a great time to buy a home. Thinking about buying or refinancing - give me a call 214-631-5626 or apply www.BobMortgage.com. #BobMortgage #TheBobJohnsonTeam #WallickandVolk #Candysdirt
Views: 46 Bob Mortgage
Mortgage Backed Securities Explained (Investopedia)
 
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Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS) explained by Investopedia https://www.youtube.com/user/investopediacom/featured http://www.investopedia.com/video
Views: 1700 Mu Mei
Mortgage Fraud Securitized Gold SIlver Stock Market Bailout Digitized Note Bond MERS Collapse
 
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How the current fraud works. Explanation of fraud mechanics and implications for other paper promises. Mortgage Loan Fraud Leverage stock market bond gold silver platinum commodities NWO Martial Law NASDAQ DOW S&P economic Collapse Donate: http://www.s119320640.onlinehome.us
Views: 3588 VerifiedNews