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Short Term High Yield Bonds
 
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The current low interest rate environment means that bond investors have to take more risk in order to gain an attractive return on their invested money. The current low interest rates also present a risk that if interest rates and inflation rise in the future, then bond prices may fall and portfolios could suffer losses.
Views: 7678 hubbis
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 528193 Khan Academy
government bond explained | government schemes 2018 | What are bonds | latest bonds
 
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Hello friends in this video we will see latest bonds from government. The government has announced the launch of 7.75% Savings (Taxable) Bonds, 2018, which will open for subscription from January 10, 2018. The bonds will have a maturity of seven years. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/yNw13g Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/Finbaba Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/finbabaIndia Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/finbabaIndia Instagram: http://instagram.com/finbabaIndia ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe Our Channel click Here for Latest Video https://goo.gl/yNw13g ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Related Videos : Save Tax under section 80C : https://youtu.be/y5Sat6TcJHs Mutual funds : https://youtu.be/-gP4HfMCeBQ Gold ETFS :https://youtu.be/EPjiho6m1XI Arbitrage fund : https://youtu.be/3oyryG22H4I How to find stop loss : https://youtu.be/jZugeeEVSP0 FCNR account : https://youtu.be/G4GFoQFy_RI Stock Market Tax : https://youtu.be/hcYDeXEW6eY Stock Split : https://youtu.be/NQpW2oBemyk How to Buy Share Onlie https://youtu.be/g8Eb1LVNXM0 What is Cnadle stick https://youtu.be/-Sjhv7h3IT8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Open Demat account :https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPASV ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- About: FinBaba is a you-tube channel, where you can get Information about Banking, finance, Stock market basic and Advance, Forex, Mutual funds and many more. Thanks For Watching this Video. !
Views: 62261 Fin Baba
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 361412 Khan Academy
Which Bond Fund ETF Should I Invest In? Vanguard Long-Term Bond Funds ETFs With High Yields!
 
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2018 Vanguard Long-Term Bond Fund ETF's With High Yields! Which Vanguard Bond fund should invest in? Learn about the best Vanguard dividend funds (Index Fund ETF's) Find out about the 4 top performing Vanguard Bond ETF funds available through Vanguard. The spreadsheet in the video can be downloaded here: Dropbox link: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ky22y2y0lt8ru0a/Top%204%20performing%20Vanguard%20bond%20funds%202018.xlsx?dl=0 or http://moneyandlifetv.com/downloads Video Outline and Time Stamps so you can quickly jump to any topic: • Vanguard Extended Duration Treasury ETF (EDV) - 1:22 • Vanguard Long-Term Bond Fund ETF (BLV) - 5:25 • Vanguard Long-Term Corporate Bond Fund ETF (VCLT) - 7:34 • Vanguard Tax Exempt Bond Fund ETF (VTEB) - 9:05 • Vanguard bond fund etf comparison - 11:38 • Bond Fund Pros and Cons (Bond Risks, etc) - 12:10 In this very detailed review you will learn about the four Vanguard Long-Term Bond Funds Etfs (Index Funds) available to invest in. The four Vanguard Long-Term Bond Funds 1.Vanguard Extended Duration Treasury ETF (EDV) 2. Vanguard Long-Term Bond Fund ETF (BLV) 3. Vanguard Long-Term Corporate Bond Fund ETF (VCLT) 4. Vanguard Tax Exempt Bond Fund ETF (VTEB) Check out some of our other videos and playlists here: ♦ Investing in the stock market!: https://goo.gl/yVAoES ♦ Save money, budget, build wealth and improve your financial position at any age: https://goo.gl/E97nJj ♦ Learn more about how federal income taxes work: https://goo.gl/D1hCX1 ♦ Ways to improve your life at any age: https://goo.gl/uq72bu Subscribe for our future weekly videos. New videos typically every Sunday or Wednesday. Do not forget to help out a friend and share this information with them as well. About me: I'm passionate about helping people build wealth by learning more about personal finances, investing and taxes. My mission is to help people improve their financial position career and life. I also enjoy teaching others about the accounting profession, tech tips, and helping people overcome challenges in their everyday life as well as their career. You can find our content on other internet planets such as....... My Website: Moneyandlifetv.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/Mkchip123 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/moneyandlifetv/ ***Disclaimer*** All of the information in this video is presented for educational purposes only and should not be taken as financial, tax, or investing advice by any means. I am not a financial adviser. Although I am a CPA I cannot advise someone for tax purposes without knowing their complete tax situation. You should always do your own research before implementing new ideas or strategies. If you are unsure of what to do you should consider consulting with a financial adviser or tax accountant such as an Enrolled Agent, or Certified Public Accountant in the area in which you live. Thanks for taking time to check out this video, and our channel. Have a great day and we will see you in the next video!
Views: 3902 Money and Life TV
Are You Going Too Short-Term in Your Bond Portfolio?
 
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With the Federal Reserve raising interest rates over the past couple of years, short-term investments like treasury bills and CDs with maturities of under a year or so have become very popular with investors, and rightly so. Investors have gravitated to the part of the market where they can get more yield with less interest rate risk over time. But one of the concerns that we have is that investors may be getting too short-term in their bond portfolios. Kathy Jones explains why in this week’s episode of Bond Market Today. Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/charlesschwab Click here for more insights: http://www.schwab.com/insights/ (1118-84TG)
Views: 4293 Charles Schwab
Is It a Bad Idea to Buy Bonds When Interest Rates Are Going Up?
 
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http://IncredibleRetirement.com 800-393-1017 Here’s something I bet you didn't know. The U.S. stock market, the size of the U.S. stock market is about $30 trillion. If you added up the value of all publicly traded stocks in the U.S., the market value of all those companies would come up to around $30 trillion, but what about bonds? Bonds are hardly ever mentioned or talked about in the financial media, but I bet you might be surprised to discover that the U.S. bond market is actually much bigger than the stock market. The U.S. bond market is estimated to be $40 trillion or more. That's right, the bond market is actually larger than the stock market and yet the financial media has almost all their attention and therefore our attention on the stock market. So what about bonds? Should you be buying bonds when interest rates are going up? You may have heard that when interest rates go up, bond values go down, which is true. Think of a seesaw or a teeter totter, the end that goes up is interest rates and the end that goes down is the underlying value of the bond. Bonds by the way are nothing more than a loan to a company or government or government agency. Typically bonds pay their interest twice a year, every six months, and when the loan comes due, they have a maturity date which could range anywhere from 90 days to 30 years, when you get your money back. If you look at long term returns of investments, let's say 15 year timeframe or longer, then it's no secret stocks have outperformed bonds by a large, large margin; so if stocks do better than bonds over the long term why not just have all of your money in stocks? Well the problem is while stocks tend to deliver nice, long term returns, but the short term oh, that could be a whole other story. Stocks on the short term can be extremely volatile. Just look what happened in the financial crisis of 2008. The S&P 500, the 500 largest publically traded companies in America, lost about 38% in value. So $100,000 in the S&P 500 at the end of 2008 was now worth $62,000. Ouch! That's a lot of short term volatility which tends to make you and I uncomfortable, to say the least. So how do we dampen or minimize that volatility? Imagine you have a sailboat and you have entered it into a race. One way to make your sailboat go faster is to make it lighter. But the lighter the sailboat, the more likely it is to capsize with a gust of wind. To prevent that you add weight or ballast to the sailboat. That slows the speed of the boat down but it reduces the odds of the boat capsizing and sinking. This is how you should think of bonds in your overall investment strategy. They are going to slow down the overall growth of your investment accounts but they are there to keep you from capsizing, to keep you from sinking during short-term periods of market volatility. So the answer to the question should you buy bonds, even when interest rates are going up, as a long term investor, the answer is a qualified yes, and here's what I mean by that. If you buy individual bonds and hold the bond until it matures or is called away early by the issuer then you'll receive the interest and get all your money back when the bond matures. The value of the bond can and will fluctuate while you own it, but it doesn't affect you if you hold it to maturity because then you get all your money back. This is why it's important to own individual bonds, especially in a rising interest rate environment, you don't lose money if you hold the bond until maturity. Why not just use a bond mutual fund? The problem with a bond mutual fund is it doesn't have a maturity date. People are constantly adding or withholding money from the mutual fund itself and typically at the wrong time. In a rising interest rate market, a lot of people in bond mutual funds take some or all of their money out of the mutual fund which forces the mutual fund manager to sell bonds even if they didn't want to. They have to generate the money to pay back the investors and that could drive the value or the price of bonds down even further. Ideally, you want to use individual bonds so you know for sure you get your money back when the bond matures. If you have a small account, and I would say a small account would be $200,000 or less, then you may not have enough money to properly diversify into individual bonds and you may have to still use bond mutual funds and if that's the case in a rising interest rate market you want to focus on short term bond funds or floating rate bond funds. Buying individual bonds as part of your investment strategy will help you move one step closer to experiencing your version of an incredible retirement doing what you want, when you want.
Views: 1052 Brian Fricke
How to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity
 
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This video will show you how to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity in a financial calculator. If you need to find the Present value by hand please watch this video :) http://youtu.be/5uAICRPUzsM There are more videos for EXCEL as well Like and subscribe :) Please visit us at http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning
Views: 292209 I Hate Math Group, Inc
What Is The Interest Rate On Government Bonds?
 
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This makes treasury current interest rates. Us 10 year government bond interest rate is at 2. Today (3 22 2012) the interest rate on ee series savings bond 3 feb 2016 treasury yields keep sliding. Coupon interest and yield for etbs treasury bonds how to earn 3. Rates are mainly determined by the price charged lender, risk from get updated data about us treasuries. But amazingly enough, u. When i read this statement, thought it was odd. Us 10 year government bond interest rate ycharts. The 8% government of india bonds livemint. Latest bond rates, interest libor and interbank rates ft. Interest rates long term interest oecd data. Average interest rates on u. Rates & bonds bloomberg. Negative interest rates a third of all government bonds are quartz. 5% on a us savings bond forbes. Show is the interest rate on a treasury bond determined? Interest rates and your investments investopedia. If you are just remember anything that increases the demand for long term treasury bonds puts downward pressure on interest rates (higher higher refer to government maturing in ten years. Graph and download economic data from jan 1957 to oct 2016 about india, securities, bonds, government, interest rate, interest, rate at karvy value, chose a list of top tax free bonds in india with coupon & last traded price, etc. 13 apr 2016 other comparable products such as fixed deposits from banks like sbi and hdfc bank pay a maximum of 7. The incredible shrinking interest rate febtreasury bonds cbk central bank of kenya. Fixed rate from jul 2017, inflation effective 01 jun 2017. List of best government bonds in india bond 10y calendar average interest rates on u. Sthe files listed below illustrate the average interest rates for marketable and non securities over 15 apr 2015 explore difference between bond coupons, what determines current yield on debt instruments, why treasury prices most investors care about future rates, but none more than bondholders. The bonds will bear interest at the rate of 8. Government of india savings bond make a comeback. Under income tax act, the by interest on india 10y increased 0. Bond rates look shockingly high when compared to yields for other developed most treasury bonds in kenya are fixed rate, meaning that the interest rate determined at auction is locked entire life of bond. Rates rsa retail savings bonds. 19 Government of india savings bond make a comeback. Find information on government bonds yields, muni and interest rates in the usa 7 jul 2016 if you were to buy, at random, any bond, there is a one three third of global debt now has negative latest international benchmark treasury bond rates, yield curves, spreads, interbank official coupon rate set when first issued by australian are medium long term securities that carry an annual fixed over life 22 mar 2012 source us dept. Feb 2017 they carry an assured interest rate of. Bonds infrastructure bonds, bonds market, capital gains interest rates, government securities, for india tax free. Inflation rate inflation linked 5 year bond, 2.
Views: 153 new sparky
B is for Bonds - The Elite Investor Club's A - Z of Investing
 
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To Join the Elite Investor Club, head over to http://www.eliteinvestorclub.com/ Welcome back to the Elite Investor Club’s A to Z of investing. I hope you’ve taken steps to sort out your asset allocation. In this episode we’re going to cover one of the biggest asset classes of all and one of the most misunderstood – bonds! Don’t be fooled by the official sounding language. A bond is quite simply a loan. It’s usually either a loan to a government or a loan to a company. Companies need money to expand their operations, develop and launch new products or acquire other companies. Governments need money because politicians are incapable of living within their means, spend money they don’t have to meet their promises to their cronies and hope that there are enough suckers in the bond markets to buy their loans at pathetically low rates of interest. So far, sadly, they’ve been proved right. The global bond market is enormous and is dominated by America, where short term loans of less than a year are called Treasury bills or T bills. Those that mature in one to ten years are T Notes and the really long term ones that can go up to thirty years are called Treasury Bonds. In the UK these government bonds are known as gilts, presumably because the government is guilty about how little interest they pay. What you’re buying as an investor is a guaranteed future stream of income, called the coupon, and the return of your capital or principle at the end of the term of the bond which can be anything from a few months to several decades. Unlike shares, you don’t own a piece of the company or the government, you just become a source of funds for them. Bonds can trade at more than their face value, a premium, or below it, at a discount. Like any asset, bonds are worth whatever someone else is prepared to pay for them. They will take into account the interest rate or yield and their view of inflation or deflation in the years ahead in arriving at the price they think those specific bonds are worth in today’s money. This where it can get confusing. If you invested ten thousand pounds in a bond paying one per cent interest for the next ten years, that’s £100 a year for ten years. What if interest rates on the next batch of bonds were to pay two per cent interest? That means I can come along with my ten thousand pounds and buy two hundred pounds a year income. The most I’d be prepared to pay for your bond is five thousand pounds, because I now want a yield of two per cent on my capital. So, when interest rates go up, bond prices come down. Conversely, when all sorts of institutions like pension funds are told by their regulators to switch from ‘risky’ stocks and shares to ‘safe’ bonds, we see so much money chasing safe bonds that the prices go sky high and the yields become zero or even negative! Even some of the basket case countries of Southern Europe are able to sell their bonds at interest rates that in no way reflect the risk of a potential default. So we now have this situation where bond prices are at a forty year high based on record low interest rates. We all have to play a guessing game about when the Bank of England in the UK or, more importantly, the Federal Reserve in America, decides to raise interest rates. Because the likely result of an interest rate rise will be a crash in bond prices. Any such crash will be exacerbated by the lack of liquidity in the market, but that’s a concept we’ll look at another time. In the world of loans to companies, corporate bonds, we’ve seen a similarly disturbing trend. Bond prices have risen significantly even for companies with poor credit ratings whose bonds are given the rather unflattering name, junk bonds. Very small companies have been successfully offering mini bonds, while at the micro company level you could even regard crowd-lending as a form of corporate bond. In all cases you have to balance the interest rate being offered with the likelihood of the company being around and able to repay your capital at the end of the bond period. If you’re new to investing, the only way you should hold bonds is within broadly diversified funds within the kind of asset allocation we discussed in the previous episode. If you’re an experienced investor, now might be the time to research strategies for shorting some of the major bond markets, either through spread betting or through leveraged ETFs that give you the chance to place a Put option on the bond markets. The bond market is too big to ignore, but at this moment in history I urge you to approach with care!
Views: 1643 Elite Investor TV
Key Things to Know about Fixed Income ETFs | Fidelity
 
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Find out more about exchange-traded funds with us at the https://www.fidelity.com/learning-center/investment-products/etf/overview To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Fixed income can be a critical part of nearly every well-diversified portfolio. Used correctly, fixed income can add diversification and a steady source of income to any investor’s portfolio. But how do you choose the right fixed-income ETF? The key to choosing the right fixed-income ETF lies in what it actually holds. U.S. bonds or international bonds? Government securities or corporate debt? Bonds that come due in two years or 20 years? Each decision determines the level of risk you’re taking and the potential return. There are many types of risks to consider with bond investing. Let’s talk more about two in particular: Credit risk and Interest-rate risk. Determining the level of credit risk you want to assume is an important first step when choosing a fixed-income ETF. Do you want an ETF that only holds conservative bonds—like bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury? Or do you want one holding riskier corporate debt? The latter may pay you a higher interest rate, but if the company issuing the bond goes bankrupt, you’ll lose out. ETFs cover the full range of available credit. Look carefully at the credit quality composition of the ETFs underlying holdings, and don’t be lured in by promises of high yields unless you understand the risks. Bonds are funny. Intuitively, you would assume that higher interest rates are good for bondholders, as they can reinvest bond income at higher prevailing interest rates. But rising interest rates may be bad news, at least in the short term. Imagine that the government issues a 10-year bond paying an interest rate of 2%. But shortly thereafter, the U.S. Federal Reserve hikes interest rates. Now, if the government wants to issue a new 10-year bond, it has to pay 3% a year in interest. No one is going to pay the same amount for the 2% bond as the 3% bond; instead, the price of the 2% bond will have to fall to make its yield as attractive as the new, higher-yielding security. That’s how bonds work, like a seesaw: As yields rise, prices fall and vice versa. Another important measure to consider when looking at interest rate risk is duration which helps to approximate the degree of price sensitivity of a bond to changes in interest rates. The longer the duration, the more any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Conversely, the shorter the duration, the less any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Let’s review a few other considerations when looking at fixed income ETFs. First, expense ratios: Because your expected return in a bond ETF is lower than in most stock ETFs, expenses take on extra importance. Generally speaking, the lower the fees, the better. Second, tracking difference: It can be harder to run a bond index fund than an equity fund, so you may see significant variation between the fund’s performance and the index’s returns. Try to seek out funds with low levels of tracking difference, meaning they track their index well. Finally, some bonds can be illiquid. As a result, it’s extra important to look out for bond ETFs with good trading volumes and tight spreads. There are other factors to watch for too, but these are the basics. ETFs can be a great tool for accessing the bond space, but as with anything, it pays to know what you’re buying before you make the leap. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, Rhode Island, 02917 723251.2.0
Views: 57237 Fidelity Investments
Should You Invest in Bonds?
 
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Want To Generate Passive Income And Achieve Financial Freedom? Join Our Free Value Investing Masterclass Today: https://bit.ly/2qXPpsS Download Our FREE Value Investing Investing ETF Guidebook : http://bit.ly/2zsZtjo In this video I will cover another common question people ask me: "Should I Invest In Bonds?" Firstly, a bond is a debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity (typically corporate or governmental) which borrows the funds for a defined period of time at a variable or fixed interest rate. In simple terms, some companies wanted more funds to grow and there are many ways to do it. One of the ways is to borrow from someone and in this case investors who buy the bonds. Since the company is borrowing from someone, it’s fair that the company has to give some form of returns to the investors (or lenders), thus the fixed interest rate. There are 2 main baskets of bond: a) Government Bonds b) Corporate Bonds My take? Unlike corporate bonds, government bonds are considered risk free as they are guaranteed by the government, it is important to understand that they still carry the interest rate risk. Interest rate is relevant for both government and corporate bonds. As the market interest rate rising, the real value of bond will decrease and vice versa. In addition to interest rate risk, corporate bonds are subjected to event risk. A company might face unforeseen circumstances which undermined their ability to pay the interest, – or repay the principal. This risk is highly depending on the company ability to generate cash. At the end of the day, just like any other forms of investments - don’t go in blindly hoping that your money will grow. You should always evaluate beforehand to avoid losing money! ★☆★ Join me in my FREE Live Masterclass and I'll answer your questions, teach you how to evaluate and invest safely in person: https://bit.ly/2qXPpsS ★☆★ SUBSCRIBE TO VALUE INVESTING ACADEMY YOUTUBE CHANNEL NOW ★☆★ https://www.youtube.com/user/ValueInvesting101?sub_confirmation=1 Check out these Top Trending Playlist: 1.) Is It Possible To Turn $10K To One Million Dollars? - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7pNGzE6jiY&t=5s 2.) Best Value Investing Singapore - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r02t9h4krx4&t=89s 3.) VIA Investing Programme Testimonials 2018 { Part A } - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHZMrW1D370&t=2s Value Investing Academy (VIA) was established in 2010 by Mr Cayden Chang with the vision of “We Care to Make you a Better Investor VIA Financial Education and Technologies”. We have understood the importance of having Value Investing Course and Value Investing in Singapore and in other parts of the world, as such, we have set up VIA with an intention of making everyone a better investor. This is why we have delivered our signature Value Investing Programme (VIP) to more than 40,000 people in 11 cities across Asia such as: Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Kuching, Penang, Phnom Penh, Yangon, Ho Chi Minh, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Taiwan and Bangkok. (MORE YET TO COME!) Don’t Miss Your Chance To Join A FREE Value Investing Masterclass today (worth $199) - Register Here: https://bit.ly/2qXPpsS - Filling Up Fast!! ** Limited Seats Only! ★☆★ CONNECT WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA ★☆★ Website: https://www.ValueInvestingAcademy.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/valueinvestingacademy/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ValueInvesting101
Views: 146 ValueInvesting101
0% Interest For the First Time Ever On U.S. Treasury Bonds 💰/ Here Come Negative Rates In The U.S.!!
 
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Subscribe! http://full.sc/1o4TTJn TWITTER: http://full.sc/1h0GJ6n "Investors" are so desperate to hold on to short-term paper that they paid $100 for a 3-month Treasury-bill at today's auction. That is a 0% yield - for the first time ever - lower even than the auction right after Lehman's bankruptcy in Nov 2008. Read More Here: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-10-05/treasury-sells-3-month-bills-0-yield-first-time-ever The analysis and discussion provided by MoneyBags73 is for your education and entertainment purposes only, it is not recommended for trading purposes. I am not an investment adviser and information obtained here should not be taken for professional investment advice. The commentary on MoneyBags73's videos reflect the opinions of MoneyBags73. Your own due diligence is recommended before buying or selling any investments, securities, or precious metals.
Views: 1507 MoneyBags73
Are You Invested In Long Term Bonds - Think Twice
 
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Facebook - facebook.com/ebutowskypub/ Twitter - twitter.com/edbutowsky Website Link- edbutowsky.com/ Ed Butowsky, top wealth manager in Dallas and managing partner of Chapwood Investment, LLC, discusses the bond market and why you should understand before investing in long term bonds. bond market, long term bonds, market, stock market, stock performance, Financial Advisor, Wealth Manager, Portfolio, Corporate Valuation, investment portfolio, financial advisor, ed butowsky financial advisor, portfolio, investments, money, evaluate your financial advisor, fox business financial advisor, ed, butowsky
Views: 12211 Ed Butowsky
How Interest Rates Are Set: The Fed's New Tools Explained
 
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The Federal Reserve has kept interest rates at near zero since the 2008 financial crisis. To raise them, it has come up with a new set of tools. A WSJ explainer. Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 185874 Wall Street Journal
Betting on Long Term Interest Rates: Bonds
 
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Spread betting on bonds http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/Spread-bet-bonds.html Betting on long term interest rates. When spread betting you can usually bet on short term interest rates or long term interest rates which relate to government bond issues. Government bonds are fixed interest securities.
Views: 435 UKspreadbetting
Which Short Term Bond Fund Should I Invest in Top 4 Vanguard Short Term Bond Fund Review!
 
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Which Short Term Bond Fund Should I Invest in Top 4 Vanguard Short Term Bond Fund Review! Learn about the best Vanguard Bond (Index Fund ETF's) Find out about the 4 top performing Short-Term Vanguard Bond ETF funds available through Vanguard. The spreadsheet in the video can be downloaded here: Dropbox link: https://www.dropbox.com/s/760gewzc6eblc86/Top%204%20performing%20Vanguard%20short%20term%20bond%20funds%2011.1.18.xlsx?dl=0 Video Outline and Time Stamps so you can quickly jump to any topic: • Vanguard Short-term Bond ETF (BSV) - 0:39 • Vanguard Inflation Protected Bond ETF (VTIP) - 5:15 •Vanguard Short-Term Treasury ETF (VGSH) - 7:05 • Vanguard Short-Term Corporate Bond ETF (VCSH) - 8:45 • Vanguard bond fund etf comparison - 11:23 • Bond Fund Chart Comparisons - 12:24 In this very detailed review you will learn about the four Vanguard Long-Term Bond Funds Etfs (Index Funds) available to invest in. The four Vanguard Long-Term Bond Funds 1.Vanguard Short-term Bond ETF (BSV) 2.Vanguard Inflation Protected Bond ETF (VTIP) 3. Vanguard Short-Term Treasury ETF (VGSH) 4. Vanguard Short-Term Corporate Bond ETF (VCSH) Important Educational Links Re: Bond Funds 5 Reasons to start investing in bonds https://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-reasons-to-start-investing-in-bonds-now The Advantage of Bonds https://www.investopedia.com/articles/00/111500.asp Risks of Bonds https://www.getsmarteraboutmoney.ca/invest/investment-products/bonds/risks-of-bonds/ http://www.finra.org/investors/understanding-bond-risk What is a bond? https://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/bond.asp Why Rising Interest Rates are Bad for Bonds https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikepatton/2013/08/30/why-rising-interest-rates-are-bad-for-bonds-and-what-you-can-do-about-it/#1712101c6308 https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/why-interest-rates-have-inverse-relationship-bond-prices/ Money Market Vs Short-Term Bonds https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/041916/money-market-vs-shortterm-bonds-compare-and-contrast-case-study.asp How To Choose The Right Bond Funds https://www.thebalance.com/choosing-bond-fund-term-416948 Short-Term Vs. Intermediate-Term Bond Funds https://finance.zacks.com/shortterm-vs-intermediateterm-bond-funds-1573.html Check out some of our other videos and playlists here: ♦ Investing in the stock market!: https://goo.gl/yVAoES ♦ Save money, budget, build wealth and improve your financial position at any age: https://goo.gl/E97nJj ♦ Learn more about how federal income taxes work: https://goo.gl/D1hCX1 ♦ Ways to improve your life at any age: https://goo.gl/uq72bu Subscribe for our future weekly videos. New videos typically every Sunday or Wednesday. Do not forget to help out a friend and share this information with them as well. About me: I'm passionate about helping people build wealth by learning more about personal finances, investing and taxes. My mission is to help people improve their financial position career and life. I also enjoy teaching others about the accounting profession, tech tips, and helping people overcome challenges in their everyday life as well as their career. My Website: Moneyandlifetv.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/Mkchip123 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/moneyandlifetv/ ***Disclaimer*** All of the information in this video is presented for educational purposes only and should not be taken as financial, tax, or investing advice by any means. I am not a financial adviser. Although I am a CPA I cannot advise someone for tax purposes without knowing their complete tax situation. You should always do your own research before implementing new ideas or strategies. If you are unsure of what to do you should consider consulting with a financial adviser or tax accountant such as an Enrolled Agent, or Certified Public Accountant in the area in which you live. Thanks for taking time to check out this video, and our channel. Have a great day and we will see you in the next video!
Views: 1438 Money and Life TV
Warren Buffett: Some People Should Not Own Stocks | CNBC
 
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Warren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO, talks about the impact of interest rates on the bond and equity markets. For more of Warren Buffett's wit and wisdom visit https://Buffett.CNBC.com » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Find CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC Warren Buffett: Some People Should Not Own Stocks | CNBC
Views: 85838 CNBC
3 Rules for Investing in Bond ETFs
 
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Robert Smith, chief investment officer at Sage Advisory, explains how he has positioned clients for the next Fed move, and how he picks exchange traded funds. Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 8926 Wall Street Journal
How Interest Rates Affect the Market
 
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Investors should observe the Federal Reserve’s funds rate, which is the cost banks pay to borrow from Federal Reserve banks. What's going on with Japan's interest rates? Read here: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/012916/bank-japan-announces-negative-interest-rates.asp?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=youtube_desc_link
Views: 79352 Investopedia
YIELD CURVE AS A RECESSION FORECASTER
 
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What do I do? Full-time independent stock market analyst and researcher: https://sven-carlin-research-platform.teachable.com/p/stock-market-research-platform Check the comparative stock list table on my Stock market research platform under curriculum preview! I am also a book author: Modern Value Investing book: https://amzn.to/2lvfH3t More about me and some written reports at the Sven Carlin blog: https://svencarlin.com Stock market for modern value investors Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/modernvalueinvesting/ What is the yield curve? The yield curve is flattening in 2018 and if it inverts there will be a recession. What to do? In this article I am going to explain what is the yield curve, what does a flattening or steepening yield curve mean, how the yield curve affects the economy and see whether the current yield curve indicates that we are close to a 2018 recession. What is the yield curve The yield curve is a chart showing the yield on bonds starting with short term maturities to long term maturities. The used bond maturities are from one month to 30 years. What the yield curve is showing is practically the cost of borrowing money over time for the U.S. government in this case. Steepening and flattening yield curve The yield curve can be flat or steep. A steep yield curve is usually at the beginning of an economic expansion. Investors fear future higher inflation and demand a higher return for the long term but the central bank still keeps short term rates low. Thus, the yield steepens. A flat yield curve shows that long term investors are willing to take an equal yield as short-term investors in order to lock in the yield for the longer term. This means they are expecting lower yields in the future. And, historically is has been the case that economic recessions follow a flat yield curve.
3 Minutes! Bond Valuation Explained and How to Value a Bond
 
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OMG wow! Clicked here http://mbabullshit.com I'm shocked how easy, bond valuation video.. What is a Bond? Basically, a bond is a certificate which proves that a company borrowed money from you and now owes you money. Owning a bond is a way to earn interest payments instead of putting your money in a bank. Therefore, if a bond can give you high interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, a bond value should be high. On the other hand, if a bond will give you small coupon payments compared to bank interest, the bond value should be low. A bond can be bought either from the original company which issues the bond, or from people who already bought the bond from the corporation, but who want to sell the bond before it expires because they don’t want to wait too long before they get back their original investment So to find the theoretical value of a bond, we need to think about the bond’s interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, the bond’s face value, and the length of time before maturity when you get back the full face value of the bond. Sears Bond photo credit: Tom Spree via Wikipedia Creative Commons
Views: 87812 MBAbullshitDotCom
How to Double Your Money – Tax Free Bonds [8/9]
 
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Tax free bonds are issued by government enterprises which offer fixed payment of interest in return for borrowed money for a specified period. You don't have to pay any tax on the interest earned from these bonds. They typically have long term maturity of 10, 15 or 20 years. Tax free bonds can be transacted in stock exchanges. These bonds give return of around 11%-12% if bought at the time of it's issue. While, it gives a return of 9-9.5% if bought at stock exchange. Tax-free bonds are suitable for investors looking for a steady source of income annually and can afford to lock-in their capital for the long term. Tax free bonds are a risk free investment option to double money. Watch our video to know more about it.
Views: 3415 B Wealthy
Advantages and Disadvantages of Treasury Bonds
 
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Learn why Treasury bonds could be the right investment for you. Read More: https://www.gobankingrates.com/investing/bonds/advantages-disadvantages-treasury-direct-bonds/ Learn more at: https://www.gobankingrates.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GOBankingRates Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gobankingrates Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/gobankingrates LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/go-banking-rates Twitter: https://twitter.com/GOBankingRates
Views: 490 GBR
What Happens to My Bonds When Interest Rates Rise?
 
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With interest rate hikes and indications that there will be further increases this year, we've been receiving questions about the impact of rising interest rates on a bond portfolio. In this video, Pure Financial's Director of Research, Brian Perry, CFP®, CFA® answers the question, "what will happen to my bond portfolio when interest rates rise?" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” http://bit.ly/2FDSfK2 Channels & show times: http://yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
7.75% GOI Savings Bonds explained in Hindi | Government of India Bonds | Govt Bonds Explained
 
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7.75% GOI Savings Bonds explained in Hindi | Government of India Bonds | Govt Bonds Explained Yadnya Book - 108 Questions & Answers on Mutual Funds & SIP - Available here: Amazon: https://goo.gl/WCq89k Flipkart: https://goo.gl/tCs2nR Infibeam: https://goo.gl/acMn7j Notionpress: https://goo.gl/REq6To Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/InvestYadnya Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/InvestYadnya
Quick Takes:  Why Short Term Bonds Are Especially Defensive Today
 
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Andrew Wittkop, executive vice president and portfolio manager, discusses the merits of short duration strategies for investors concerned about rising interest rates and increased volatility. For more information, please visit http://pimco.com/cash-management Follow us for insights on economies, markets and investing: Twitter: https://twitter.com/pimco LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/pimco Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pimco Blog: http://blog.pimco.com Terms and conditions: pimco.com/socialmedia
Views: 820 PIMCO
How High Might Bond Yields Rise?
 
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The Federal Reserve has been raising interest rates for the past couple of years. It looks like they’re signaling that they’re going to continue to raise them over the next year or so, and yet what we’ve seen recently is that longer-term treasury bond yields haven’t been rising as much. On this episode of Bond Market Today, Kathy Jones and Collin Martin discuss how high bond yields might go in this cycle. Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/charlesschwab Click here for more insights: http://www.schwab.com/insights/ (0918-890F)
Views: 6839 Charles Schwab
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
What are bonds and Debentures || Bond क्या होता है
 
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Bonds and Debentures ? Both are long term debt instruments. Issued by Government of India or by public listed company ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/yNw13g Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/Finbaba Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/finbabaIndia Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/finbabaIndia Instagram: http://instagram.com/finbabaIndia ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe Our Channel click Here for Latest Video https://goo.gl/yNw13g ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Related Videos : Save Tax under section 80C : https://youtu.be/y5Sat6TcJHs Mutual funds : https://youtu.be/-gP4HfMCeBQ Gold ETFS :https://youtu.be/EPjiho6m1XI Arbitrage fund : https://youtu.be/3oyryG22H4I How to find stop loss : https://youtu.be/jZugeeEVSP0 FCNR account : https://youtu.be/G4GFoQFy_RI Stock Market Tax : https://youtu.be/hcYDeXEW6eY Stock Split : https://youtu.be/NQpW2oBemyk How to Buy Share Onlie https://youtu.be/g8Eb1LVNXM0 What is Cnadle stick https://youtu.be/-Sjhv7h3IT8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Open Demat account :https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPASV ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- About: FinBaba is a you-tube channel, where you can get Information about Banking, finance, Stock market basic and Advance, Forex, Mutual funds and many more. Thanks For Watching this Video. !
Views: 98959 Fin Baba
BVTV: Listed infrastructure – how would the asset class respond to higher interest rates?
 
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A number of asset classes, including listed infrastructure assets, have benefited from the global search for yield that has taken place following a collapse in short and long-term government bond yields. But what if the positive tailwinds of low interest rates and inflation start to reverse? Whilst the current consensus is that monetary policy stimulus will be removed at a very gradual pace, it is important to acknowledge that a sharp rise in inflation may see a policy response in the form of much higher interest rates. Listed infrastructure companies are generally viewed as being highly sensitive to interest rate rises given they generally carry more debt than other companies. To discuss the impact of higher interest rates, this week on BVTV I’m joined by Fund Manager Alex Araujo for a quick-fire round of questions on listed infrastructure assets.
Views: 1296 Bond Vigilantes
STOCKS TO WATCH IN 2018 - ETF BOND HEDGE
 
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What do I do? Full-time independent stock market analyst and researcher: https://sven-carlin-research-platform.teachable.com/p/stock-market-research-platform Check the comparative stock list table on my Stock market research platform under curriculum preview! I am also a book author: Modern Value Investing book: https://amzn.to/2lvfH3t More about me and some written reports at the Sven Carlin blog: https://svencarlin.com Stock market for modern value investors Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/modernvalueinvesting/ I will start the stocks to watch or stocks to buy in 2018 series with a bond and the rationale behind investing in bonds. The current yield has gone up and if you want protection from declining yields and low inflation, you might want to look at bonds. This does not mean a financial crisis will come but a proper portfolio strategy should hold bonds and a 2.4% yield is attractive. Nobody knows whether the FED will be able to deliver on its projected policy measures but being prepared to anything is always good. Perhaps a Treasury bond or ETF will be the best investment or stock in 2018. I discuss why a bond ETF might be a good hedge for your portfolio by analyzing macroeconomic factors affecting the American economy,
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 513540 Khan Academy
Italian long term bonds go on sale to the global financial markets
 
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(30 Aug 2012) 1. Wide of bank exterior 2. Mid of man entering Intesa San Paolo bank 3. Close of Italian Treasury Ministry announcement of medium and long-term bonds 4. Close tilt down of details of BTPs (Buono del Tesoro Poliennale, or Italian government bonds) 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Edoardo Capello, trader at investment company Campesio SIM: "(Bond) auction results have been very good with falling yields below 5 percent at roughly 4.8 percent versus more than 5.2 of the July auction, and the bid-to-cover has been quite strong at 1.4 percent versus the 1.2 of the July auction, so the interest of the investors is returning to Italy." 6. Close pan of monitor showing Italian stock exchange index (just after opening reaching + 0.12 percent) 7. Mid of monitor showing European stock exchange indexes 8. SOUNDBITE (English) Edoardo Capello, trader at investment company Campesio SIM: "Market sentiment is improving and investors recognise achievements made by the Italian government, as shown by the latest auction results, with good bid-to-cover and falling yields. The market is not punishing Italy but it is rewarding Germany." 9. Close of monitor showing yield difference between Italian and German bonds (just after European stock exchange opening at +8 basis points) 10. Mid of monitor showing trend of yield difference between Italian and German bonds over last year 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Edoardo Capello, trader at investment company Campesio SIM: "I don't think Italy will need external help, as has been made clear by Angela Merkel yesterday in the meeting with our prime minister, Mario Monti. Moody's has clearly expressed its appreciation for the work of our prime minister, and foresees the end of the recession in 2013." 12. Engraving on side of building reading (Italian) "Italian commercial bank" 13. Woman withdrawing cash from ATM 14. Wide of Colosseum STORYLINE: A successful government bond sale in Italy on Thursday eased concerns that the country's borrowing rates are spiralling out of control. Italy paid lower rates to easily sell 6.5 billion (b) euros (8.15 billion (b) US dollars) in treasury bonds. It was the third auction this week that saw Italy's borrowing rates drop amid increased investor confidence in it. "(Bond) auction results have been very good," said Edoardo Capello, a trader at investment company Campesio SIM. "So the interest of the investors is returning to Italy." Ten-year bonds were sold at a rate of 5.82 percent - down from 5.96 percent - and with a demand that was 1.42 times the amount on offer. "Market sentiment is improving," Capello said. "Investors recognise the achievements made by the Italian government, as shown by the latest auction results, with good bid-to-cover and falling yields." "The market is not punishing Italy but it is rewarding Germany," he added. The successful bond auction followed a meeting in Berlin yesterday between German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti. Merkel said she expects Italy's reform drive will help push down its borrowing costs. "Moody's has clearly expressed its appreciation for the work of our prime minister, and foresees the end of the recession in 2013," Capello said. Borrowing rates for Italy have dropped sharply in recent weeks amid expectations the European Central Bank will approve a plan to buy those countries' government bonds. =========================================================== Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: [email protected] You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/3674250e1a5965406ac5529cab1c8c5d Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 24 AP Archive
How Do Bonds Work?
 
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The topic is Bonds: Government Bonds. Where is a safe place to put your money that will result in steady growth? You have to defeat the nefarious forces of inflation, after all, and loaning your money to the government's always been a safe option. While you can put some of your trust in steadfast bonds, keep in mind that today's government treasury bonds are nothing like they were in the heyday of the 1980s, when they reached an all-time high interest rate! Though now their rates have normalized, the long term nature of bonds (usually 10 years) creates an interesting market for trading bonds at different rates. To learn more about bonds, interest rates or inflation, surf over to FinLitTV.com or click Subscribe for more FLiCs.
Views: 21214 FinLit
What Are Treasury Bonds
 
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Treasury bonds fidelity investments. Treasury bond prices and yields (video) australian government bondsaustralian bonds. Treasury bills notes and bonds definition, how to buy the balance. United states treasury security wikipedia. Treasury bonds make interest payments semi annually, and the income received is only taxed at federal level. Treasury securities? Investing in bonds. T bonds are issued with long term (maturity over 10 years) fixed interest rate debt security by a national (federal) government backed its 'full faith and credit. Individual treasury bonds rates & terms direct. Investors receive the face amount of bond at maturity treasury bonds ('t bonds') are long term, semiannual issued by u. Coupon interest payments are made every six months. Bonds and securities treasury. Treasury bonds are issued in a term of 30 years and offered multiples $100 4 apr 2017 treasury bills, notes fixed income securities by the u. You also can buy them through a bank or broker. We no longer sell bonds in legacy treasury direct, 13 jul 2015 rates & terms. The money paid out for a treasury bond is essentially bonds. What are the differences between a treasury bond and what bonds? Definition & rates video lesson definition example is (t bond)? meaning u. Treasury securities and how they work treasury bonds what are, work, to buy them. There's no such thing as a risk free investment, but if there was it'd be treasury bonds. Treasury bonds are defined as u. What is a treasury bond (t bond)? Youtube. Treasury bonds pay a fixed rate of interest each year. Stheir differences, how to buy them, and their the u. Treasury security, you are lending can buy treasury bonds from us in treasurydirect. Treasury securities such as bills, notes and bonds are debt obligations of the u. Treasury bonds cbk central bank of kenya. Sinvestors in treasury notes (which have shorter term maturities, from 1 to 10 years) and bonds maturities of up 30 receive interest payments, known 8 mar 2015treasury are a secure, medium long investment that typically offer you payments every six months throughout the bond's maturity 16 nov 2016 information dealing with purchase, redemption, replacement, forms, valuation savings securities is located on may 2011. Treasury bonds, notes and bills differ in the lengths of time they are issued manner which definition. The four types of debt are treasury bills 31 mar 2015 the federal government offers three categories fixed income securities to buying public bonds (t bonds), notes notes) and bills). Federal government suspended issuing 30 year treasury bonds for four years from february 18, 2002 to 9, treasuries are debt obligations issued and backed by the full faith credit of u. Treasury bond (t bond) investopedia. Next to treasury bills (maturity less than one year), and notes ten years) t bonds are the safest form of marketable investment u. Government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Interest is paid semi annually and taxed only
Views: 93 new sparky
Long Term Treasury Bonds
 
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Long Term Treasury Bonds - http://FREECharts.net BUYING TREASURY BONDS : 00:00:05 Buying Treasury Bonds 00:00:16 Treasury Bond Yields 00:00:28 How To Buy Treasury Bonds 00:00:40 What Are Treasury Bonds 00:00:52 Treasury Bond Prices Buying Treasury Bonds Treasury Bonds: One of the most liquid markets in the world, treasury bonds and treasury notes are the nations debt so clearly debt instruments will be here as long as America has a dysfunctional government https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HJhXikTcfk
Views: 190 Derek Rice
Should You Buy Sovereign Gold Bonds?
 
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Sovereign Gold Bond Scheme bypasses common problems with physical gold investments. Is it worthwhile to invest in them? Note-Interest rate for latest bond issue: 2.5% p.a. Website: www.fundoomoney.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQTqvgT_qzPZn1D1bHsxtKw?sub_confirmation=1 Share video: https://youtu.be/8eAH8tzmcNw Gold has traditionally been one of the most preferred investment options for many people in India. In the past few years huge amount of gold investments by Indians had been impacting growth of investments in financial investments like equities, all types of mutual funds and debt instruments like bonds, among others. This in turn, impacted the money available in the economy for its growth. This was one of the major reasons why the government came up with the Sovereign Gold Bonds Scheme. The idea was to discourage people from buying physical gold and instead invest in a financial investment linked to gold. Here, we will try to answer a simple question: “Should you invest in the Sovereign Gold Bonds?” That’s coming up in a little while. Efficient benefit of gold investment Investing in physical gold has many problems that the gold bond bypasses. When you buy a gold bond instead of physical gold you do not incur safekeeping costs. Remember, you need to lock up your gold in a bank locker. In a gold bond, there is also no fear of the usual gold impurity or loss from making charges. Superior return to physical gold The government has promised a top-up interest payout of 2.75% per annum on gold bonds which will be paid semi-annually to the investor’s bank account. With physical gold, you only get the benefit of capital appreciation but in gold bond you get this extra interest benefit beside the capital appreciation. Long holding period ensures stable return The bond is issued for a maturity period of 8 years. It saves investors from any mid-term volatility, as over the long term, the chance of any capital loss reduces substantially. Liquidity option through exchanges You have the exit option from these bonds after completion of 5 years. These bonds can be traded on stock exchanges. Hence, people who need the cash mid-way, can theoretically sell their bonds on these exchanges if buyers are available. However, if you sell these bonds before maturity you would lose the tax benefits and need to pay taxes on the gains. Tax free return The gains made from these gold bonds are totally tax exempt if held till its maturity of 8 years. However, if you sell or transfer it early, long term capital gains tax will have to be paid after taking into account inflation indexation . Risk of stagnation While in the bond’s eight year period, chances of capital erosion are very low, there remains the risk of stagnation of value. For instance, the gold price was Rs 3,939 per 10 gram at the end of 1994 and, after 8 years at the end of 2002, the gold price was at Rs 4,286 per 10 gram, or a return of mere 8.8% in a period of 8 years. This translates to an annual compounded growth of 1.06%. Historically, gold has gone though such long periods of stagnation. Have limited exposure While the interest paid on the Sovereign Gold Bond is attractive, it does get balanced out by the risk of stagnation in the gold investment’s value. We, at FundooMoney, feel that you must have a very limited exposure to these bonds. In any case, all your gold, gold-related and commodity investments including gold exchange traded funds (ETF) should not cross 10-15% of the value of your total investments at any time. We hope you found this useful. Do share with us and others on this channel your views on investing in Sovereign Gold Bonds by writing in the comments section. For more such actionable personal finance information, subscribe to our channel. Also, visit our website, download our mobile app and stay connected with us on Instagram, Pinterest and Slideshare. Useful Links Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fundoomoney/ Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/fundoomoney/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/FundooMoney Google+ : https://plus.google.com/u/0/+FundooMoneyWorld Sound Cloud: soundcloud.com/fundoomoney Slideshare: www.slideshare.net/FundooMoneyWorld LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fundoomoney
Views: 8620 FundooMoney
What are Treasury Securities?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Treasury Securities” These U.S. government-issued debt securities are divided into three categories by maturity dates: Treasury bonds mature in 10 or more years, Treasury notes mature between one and 10 years and Treasury bills mature in one year or less. These debt obligations are considered the safest option for bond investors since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. But that safety comes at a price: The interest rates on Treasury’s are lower than other bonds with the same duration. Treasury securities are divided into three categories according to their lengths of maturities. These three types of bonds share many common characteristics, but also have some key differences. The categories and key features of treasury securities include: T-Bills – These have the shortest range of maturities of all government bonds at 4, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. They are the only type of treasury security found in both the capital and money markets, as three of the maturity terms fall under the 270-day dividing line between them. T-Bills are issued at a discount and mature at par value, with the difference between the purchase and sale prices constituting the interest paid on the bill. T-Notes – These notes represent the middle range of maturities in the treasury family, with maturity terms of 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years currently available. Treasury notes are issued at a $1,000 par value and mature at the same price. They pay interest semiannually. T-Bonds – Commonly referred to in the investment community as the “long bond”, T-Bonds are essentially identical to T-Notes except that they mature in 30 years. T-Bonds are also issued at and mature at a $1,000 par value and pay interest semiannually. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
US Savings Bonds
 
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http://www.profitableinvestingtips.com/bond-investing/us-savings-bonds US Savings Bonds By www.ProfitableInvestingTips.com US savings bonds are often thought of as a poor man's route to savings. Many aggressive investors and traders scoff at the idea of buying US savings bonds every payday and holding them for as long as thirty years. However, there are a number of advantages to buying and holding US savings bonds. As with all investment opportunities a little fundamental analysis of the subject is useful. So before comparing US savings bonds to dividend stocks, US Treasuries, or municipal bonds let us look at a few specifics about US savings bonds. US Savings Bonds These bonds are available in Series EE and Series I. Electronic series EE bonds are purchased via a Treasury Direct account for face value and paper series EE bonds are purchased at their face value. One earns a fixed rate of interest for the thirty year term of the bond. The treasury guarantees that the bonds will double in face value in twenty years. Series I bonds sell at face value at interest rates guaranteed to exceed that of inflation. These bonds are not tradable. The maturity periods can vary. For example, if you buy a bond with a value of $50 for $25, you'll have to wait at least 17 years to get back your investment from the government. US savings bonds are exempt from state and local taxes. Federal tax is deferred until the bond is cashed in. Interest may be tax exempt if you can document that interest was used to pay qualified higher education expenses and provide that your income falls within federal guidelines for this benefit. As with many long term investments you will commonly cash in US savings bonds when you are retired and when your tax rate is low. US savings bonds pay interest twice a year and are redeemed at par value at maturity. Savings Bonds come in eight values: $50, $75, $100, $200, $500, $1,000, $5,000 and $10,000. Why Purchase US Savings Bonds? There are certainly lots of investments that can make a lot more money over the years than US savings bonds. And there are lots of investments that can disappear in a puff of smoke during an economic downturn. US savings bonds are like money in the bank. A good rule of thumb for investing is to first pay off credit card debt, invest in your home, and put six months of savings away for emergencies. Think of US savings bonds in this context. US Savings Bonds versus Municipal Bonds Like municipal bonds, US savings bonds are free of state and local taxes. Unlike municipal bonds US savings bonds are less likely to default than when cities like Detroit declare bankruptcy. US Savings Bonds versus Dividend Stocks Dividend stocks are a common way to balance the risk in an aggressive stock portfolio. However, even large cap stocks can fall in price or fall out of favor. When markets are falling US savings bonds still maintain their value and pay interest. Buying US Savings Bonds Bonds are purchased with a Treasury Direct account. For such an account you need a social security number, a driver's license, a checking or savings account, and an email address. According to the US Treasury site: Minimum Purchase: $25 Maximum Purchase: $30,000 per person per year Interest: 90% of 6-month average of 5-year Treasury security yields, added monthly and paid when the bond is cashed Minimum Term Of Ownership: 12 months Early Redemption Penalty: Forfeit three most recent months' interest if cashed before 5 years http://youtu.be/YiLuGt62mZA
Views: 19391 InvestingTip
Facts About the Fed and Interest Rates
 
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Economic growth has improved, driving unemployment down and increasing inflation. This has prompted the Federal Reserve to raise short-term rates. But what does this mean for you as a long-term investor? 1. First things first: What is the Federal Reserve? The Federal Reserve Bank, also known as the Fed, is the central bank of the United States. Its members meet eight times a year and work to help keep the U.S. economy running smoothly. In general, the Federal Reserve often changes interest rates to either spur economic growth or slow the economy down. If unemployment is low and inflation is expected to rise above the Fed’s long-term objective of 2%, the Fed may decide to increase rates to prevent higher inflation and the economy from overheating. On the other hand, if unemployment is high or inflation is too low, the Fed may decide to cut interest rates to help spur stronger economic growth. In 2017, the environment is a bit different. We expect the Fed to continue a slow, patient pace of short-term rate increases, not because the economy is overheating, but in order to get rates back to more normal levels. 2. What does the Fed control? The Fed sets a target range for the short-term lending rate, which is also known as the federal funds rate. However, it typically only influences long-term interest rates. For most investors, longer-term interest rates are more important than the short-term federal funds rate. A variety of factors – such as the outlook for economic growth and inflation, supply and demand for credit, market sentiment, and other factors beyond the Fed’s control – impact long-term rates. The Fed has been in the news lately because it plans to reduce its holdings of longer-term government bonds. This will be a gradual process, according to the Fed, and while it could increase long-term rates, it also could be partially offset by other factors. 3. What should you do? Keep in mind that while the Fed’s actions can disrupt the market in the short term, your important financial goals likely haven’t changed. Instead of predicting what the Fed will do next, visit your Edward Jones financial advisor to make sure your portfolio is properly allocated and prepared for any additional rate increases. Important information: This information is for educational and illustrative purposes only and should not be interpreted as specific investment advice. Investors should make investment decisions based on their unique investment objectives and financial situation. Investors should understand the risks involved of owning investments, including interest rate risk, credit risk and market risk. The value of investments fluctuates, and investors can lose some or all of their principal. Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss. If you'd like to meet with an Edward Jones financial advisor to talk about your financial needs, use our locator to find one near you: http://bit.ly/2lPxtxI.
Views: 6125 Edward Jones
🔴Ep. 434: Blind Fed Leading Blind Investors over a Financial Cliff
 
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The Peter Schiff Show Podcast - Episode 434 RATE AND REVIEW this podcast on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/PeterSchiff/reviews/ Everything up on the Week Except Treasury Bonds and the Dollar - The stock market ended a positive week on a little bit of a down note; all of the major averages had small losses today - well off the lows of the day.  The market tried a couple of times to sell off but the dips were bought on each occasion and we ended up closing near the highs of the day, even though we were down on the day. Pretty much everything was up on the week except treasury bonds and the dollar. The dollar fell, long-term interest rates rose.  Gold was up.  Oil was the big winner, even though it was down close to a dollar a barrel today, we closed right around $52; up better than 8% on the week. All Fed - No Change in Fundamentals - But what has been driving the rally has all been the Fed. There's nothing fundamental that has changed about the U.S. economy or about the U.S. stock market other than the "Powell Put" is now back in play.  In fact, it's not just Powell putting that out there, he has been joined by a chorus of central bankers who came out today, yesterday, all throughout the week - they're all now reading from the same dovish playbook.  They've got their marching orders and they are talking up the market.  Now talking how the Fed has to listen to the market, be careful and take its cues from the market. It used to be that the market didn't matter.  The Fed was going to do its thing and the markets are going to do what they are going to do. And it didn't take long for that to change.  The Fed Can Not Allow the House of Cards to Fall - Of course, I've been saying that all along; that the Fed was not going to allow this house of cards that they deliberately inflated to just fall apart. Now they had to pretend that they didn't care about the markets but, of course the whole time, they were hoping the markets actually didn't go down because they didn't want to have to reverse policy.  They wanted to talk tough even though they didn't have a stick. SIGN UP FOR MY FREE NEWSLETTER http://www.europac.net/subscribe_free_reports Schiff Gold News: http://www.SchiffGold.com/news Open your Goldmoney account today: https://www.Goldmoney.com/ Buy my newest book at http://www.tinyurl.com/RealCrash Like and follow Peter Schiff on Facebook http://www.Facebook.com/PeterSchiff Follow me on Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/PeterSchiff
Views: 63040 Peter Schiff
9. Yield Curve Arbitrage
 
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Financial Theory (ECON 251) Where can you find the market rates of interest (or equivalently the zero coupon bond prices) for every maturity? This lecture shows how to infer them from the prices of Treasury bonds of every maturity, first using the method of replication, and again using the principle of duality. Treasury bond prices, or at least Treasury bond yields, are published every day in major newspapers. From the zero coupon bond prices one can immediately infer the forward interest rates. Under certain conditions these forward rates can tell us a lot about how traders think the prices of Treasury bonds will evolve in the future. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Defining Yield 09:07 - Chapter 2. Assessing Market Interest Rate from Treasury Bonds 35:46 - Chapter 3. Zero Coupon Bonds and the Principle of Duality 50:31 - Chapter 4. Forward Interest Rate 01:10:05 - Chapter 5. Calculating Prices in the Future and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
Views: 51563 YaleCourses
Government Bond ETFs to Date 2016 Performance Review (ZROZ, EDV)
 
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https://goo.gl/QPCkqk - Start earning with binary options like millions of traders do Government bonds have traditionally been a preferred option for investors seeking a safe haven from stock market volatility, of which there was plenty in the first couple of months of 2016. Government bond exchange-traded fund (ETF) assets swelled during these months as did their returns. Through March 24, 2016, the Barclays US Aggregate Bond TR USD gained 2.39 year-to-date (YTD). However, investors in long-term government bond ETFs have seen their share prices increase by 7.35%. Based on the returns of the 29 government bond ETFs, the longer the average maturity of the underlying bond portfolio, the better the return. To illustrate, the largest government bond fund, the iShares 1-3 Year Treasury Bond ETF (NYSEARCA: SHY) has returned 3.6% YTD, while the third-largest fund, the iShares 20+ Treasury Bond ETF (NASDAQ: TLT), has returned 7.6%. Short-term government bond funds are most appropriate during periods of rising interest rates because bonds with short maturities are rotated out for bonds with higher coupon rates. Should interest rates rise as expected, short-term government ETFs should be a viable alternative for low-yielding money market funds. Long-term government bond funds should continue to perform well as long as the stock market displays signs of volatility. Should interest rates rise more quickly than expected, they could reverse course and experience a decline in prices. Thus far in 2016, short- and long-term bonds are performing as expected, but there are a couple of outliers at each end of the spectrum. The Best-Performing Long-Term Bond ETFs YTD in 2016 PIMCO 25+ Year Zero Coupon US Treasury ETF As of March 24, 2016, the PIMCO 25+ Year Zero Coupon US Treasury ETF (NYSEARCA: ZROZ) had $246.11 million in assets under management (AUM) invested primarily in Treasury Principal STRIPs. STRIPS is an acronym for separate trading of registered interest and principal securities, which are a type of zero coupon bond. STRIPS are deeply discounted bonds that pay no current interest. Bondholders are paid the full face value of the bond at maturity. The fund seeks to replicate the performance of the BofA Merrill Lynch Long US Treasury Principal STRIPS Index. Through March 26, 2016, the fund returned an impressive 11.91%. Over the last five years it has returned 15.77%. The fund’s expense ratio is a low 0.16%. Vanguard Extended Duration Treasury ETF The Vanguard Extended Duration Treasury ETF (NYSEARCA: EDV) has $504 million in AUM, also invested primarily in Treasury STRIPS. The fund tracks the Barclays U.S. Treasury STRIPS 20-30 Year Equal Par Bond Index and has gained 11.77% YTD in 2016. Its five-year return is 15.20%. The fund’s expense ratio is a very low 0.10%. The Worst-Performing Long-Term Bond ETFs YTD in 2016 iShares Treasury Floating Rate Bond As of March 24, 2016, the iShares Treasury Floating Rate Bond (NYSEARCA: TFLO) ETF had $15 million in AUM. The fund seeks to mirror the performance of the Barclays U.S. Trea
Views: 15 ETFs
What is an Inverted Yield Curve?
 
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Also referred to as 'negative yield curve' it is a rare scenario in which short-term interest rates produce higher yields than long-term interest rates. When this happens it is usually an indication that an expected decline in interest rates are to occur. An inverted yield curve is when the yields on bonds with a shorter duration are higher than the yields on bonds that have a longer duration. This usually only happens with Treasury note yields. That's when yields on one-month, six-month or one-year Treasury bills are higher than yields on 10-year or 30-year Treasury bonds. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy.
What is a Callable Bond? How Do Callable Bonds Work?
 
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What is a Callable Bond? How Do Callable Bonds Work? - Please take a moment to Like, Subscribe, and Comment on this video! View Our Channel To See More Helpful Finance Videos - https://www.youtube.com/user/FinanceWisdomForYou savings bonds bonds surety bond municipal bonds cusip treasury bonds i bonds bearer bonds junk bonds what are bonds bonds definition bond buyer bond market what is a surety bond government bonds saving bonds corporate bonds performance bond types of bonds munis bond yield bond ratings zero coupon bonds israel bonds stocks and bonds convertible bonds cusip number tax free municipal bonds zero coupon bond callable bonds bond rates high yield bonds bond funds bond prices treasury bond rates treasury bond municipal bond investing in bonds puerto rico municipal bonds muni bonds buying bonds how to buy bonds best bond funds junk bond treasury bill rates tax free bonds debenture bonds convertible bond municipal bond rates the bond buyer corporate bond bond yields convertible preferred stock buy bonds build america bonds bid bond corporate bond rates general obligation bonds bond quotes bond interest rates treasury bonds rates what is a municipal bond how bonds work bond insurance investment grade bonds revenue bonds how to invest in bonds e bonds bonds and interest rates government bond short term bonds performance bonds what is a sinking fund discount bond bond fund what are municipal bonds surety bond definition what is a corporate bond bond trading tax exempt bonds bond investing bond price corporate bonds definition municipal bonds rates savings bonds bonds surety bond municipal bonds cusip treasury bonds i bonds bearer bonds junk bonds what are bonds bonds definition bond buyer bond market what is a surety bond government bonds saving bonds corporate bonds performance bond types of bonds munis bond yield bond ratings zero coupon bonds israel bonds stocks and bonds convertible bonds cusip number tax free municipal bonds zero coupon bond callable bonds bond rates high yield bonds bond funds bond prices treasury bond rates treasury bond municipal bond investing in bonds puerto rico municipal bonds muni bonds buying bonds how to buy bonds best bond funds junk bond treasury bill rates tax free bonds debenture bonds convertible bond municipal bond rates the bond buyer corporate bond bond yields convertible preferred stock buy bonds build america bonds bid bond corporate bond rates general obligation bonds bond quotes bond interest rates treasury bonds rates what is a municipal bond how bonds work bond insurance investment grade bonds revenue bonds how to invest in bonds e bonds bonds and interest rates government bond short term bonds performance bonds what is a sinking fund discount bond bond fund what are municipal bonds surety bond definition what is a corporate bond bond trading tax exempt bonds bond investing bond price corporate bonds definition municipal bonds rates What is a Callable Bond? How Do Callable Bonds Work? What is a Callable Bond? How Do Callable Bonds Work? Issuers call bonds when interest rates drop below where they were when the bond was issued. For example, if a bond is issued at a rate of 7% and the market rate for bonds of that type drops to 6% and stays there, when the bond becomes callable the issuer will likely call it in order to issue new bonds at 6%. Obviously, callability benefits issuers and hurts investors, who are faced with the prospect of reinvesting their money at lower interest rates. Finance Wisdom For You Finance Wisdom For You Optional Redemption. Allows the issuer, at its option, to redeem the bonds. Many municipal bonds, for example, have optional call features that issuers may exercise after a period of years, often ten years. f the Day helps you gain a better understanding of all things financial with technical and easy-to-understand explanations Sinking Fund Redemption. Requires the issu What is a Callable Bond? How Do Callable Bonds Work?
The Global Impact of a Rising Treasury Yield
 
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After U.S. Federal Reserve officials signaled an upcoming interest rate hike, the Fed Funds Futures market did not wait for reports from the U.S. labor market. Already by mid-week, the market was anticipating a 100 percent chance of a 25 basis-point rate hike at next week's meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee. The U.S. 10-year Treasury yield also climbed to its highest level this year, close to 2.60 percent. In the U.S., markets are focused on whether there will be two or three rate hikes this year. But internationally, higher U.S. Treasury yields are affecting other countries' government bond yields and perhaps their currency values as well. Focus is shifting from short-term interest rates to long-term yields. In Europe, yields on the German 10-year Bund, the equivalent of the U.S. Treasury bond, have risen in the same magnitude as U.S. 10-year Treasury yields. While the president of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, is known as a dove, there are hawks within the ECB who want to end quantitative easing sooner than later. Eurozone inflation is at 2 percent, which is their target. Given ECB's mandate of controlling inflation only (rather than having a dual mandate that includes full employment, such as our Fed has), this is justified. However, the hesitation to end quantitative easing is pretty straightforward: • German inflation is at 2.2 percent but other eurozone countries are not as high • Political risks from upcoming elections in France, the Netherlands and Germany are putting the ECB in a wait-and-see mode • The risk of moving too early in raising rates is viewed as larger than moving too slowly Consequently, short-term interest rates in Europe have not gone up but the bond market is reflecting the rising inflation picture. In Japan, the 10-year Japanese Government Bond (JGB) yields are trying to rise but have been suppressed. Japan is starting to see some rise in inflation with a cheaper yen and higher oil prices. Bank of Japan Board Member Takako Masai was quoted this week as saying that Japan is no longer in a state of sustained deflation. What keeps JGB yields from rising further is the policy of the BOJ to target the 10-year JGB yield at “close to 0 percent." Consequently, BOJ continues to buy JGBs when the yield rises too high. My View: Bund yields rising higher than JGB yields explains why the yen has weakened more than the euro. This trend may continue until the BOJ loosens its grip and allows for a further steepening of their yield curve, which would allow JGB yields to rise a bit more. Until then, we may see a period of more yen weakness than euro weakness.
Views: 96 City National Bank
Fiscal Policy - Bonds and Yield Curves
 
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Fiscal Policy - Bonds and Yield Curves - An understanding of why bonds and yield curves are important for an economy and for a government when enacting fiscal policy
Views: 12081 EconplusDal
Bonds & Debentures - Explained
 
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Bonds and Debentures are explained in hindi. Although a bond and a debenture work more or less the same way, there are few subtle differences. In this bonds vs debentures video, we will understand these differences on the basis of security, convertibility, risk etc. Bond market can give you fixed income which has much lesser risk as compared to share market. You can invest in corporate bonds & debentures, government bonds and Tax Saving Bonds. There are various types of bonds - convertible & non convertible debentures, zero coupon bonds, callable bonds, secured & unsecured debentures, redeemable a& irredeemable bonds etc. Related Videos: Shares vs Debentures (Bonds) - https://youtu.be/afSACc6c2c0 Types of Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/5YN_Uo7stms How to Invest in Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/hC9OsIzAoEk हिंदी में Bonds and Debentures के बीच तुलना। हालांकि एक bond और debenture एक ही तरह से कम या ज्यादा काम करते हैं, कुछ subtle differences हैं। इस bonds vs debentures वीडियो में, हम security, convertibility, risk etc के आधार पर इन differences को समझेंगे। Share this video: https://youtu.be/BdMg5RmMj_0 Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Finance Tips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNxHPbaCWL1tKw2hxGQD6g To access more learning resources on finance, check out www.assetyogi.com In this video, we have explained: What is equity financing? What is debt financing? What is an example of debt financing? What is the difference between a debenture and a bond? What are debentures in simple terms? What are bonds? What are the similarities between bonds and debentures? How do bonds work? What are debenture holders? How does a debenture work? If there is a requirement of funds in any company then there are two options. First one is equity financing and the other one is debt financing. Equity financing is a risk capital in which company dilute its shareholding. On the other hand, if the company doesn't want to dilute its shareholding then company raises debt financing. So in this video, we will understand the differences between bonds and debentures on the basis of security, convertibility, risk etc. A bond is a financial instrument which highlights the debt taken of the issuing body towards the holders. A debenture is an instrument used for raising long term finances. Make sure to like and share this video. Other Great Resources AssetYogi – http://assetyogi.com/ Follow Us: Instagram - http://instagram.com/assetyogi Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/assetyogi Linkedin - http://www.linkedin.com/company/asset-yogi Twitter - http://twitter.com/assetyogi Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/assetyogi/ Google Plus – https://plus.google.com/+assetyogi-ay Hope you liked this video in Hindi on “Bonds vs Debentures"
Views: 19342 Asset Yogi

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