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Alveoli: Gas Exchange
 
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Revision notes and practice question for gas exchange: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/gas-exchange-11804216 Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sciencesauce_online/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/science_sauce Facebook: https://facebook.com/sciencesauceonline/ The alveoli ("many alveoli", "one alveolus") are the sites of gas exchange in the lungs. They are tiny air sacks sometimes described as being cauliflower-shaped. Oxygen diffuses across the lining of the alveoli and blood capillaries into and into red blood cells. Carbon dioxide diffuses from the blood to the alveoli. A concentration gradient is maintained by breathing as well as blood flow. The main adaptation of the gas exchange surface are: 1. Large surface area 2. Thin wall 3. Moist lining 4. Good blood supply 5. Good ventilation
Views: 177005 Science Sauce
Respiration Gas Exchange
 
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https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105
Views: 512755 Armando Hasudungan
Gas Exchange Physiology Animation - MADE EASY
 
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Gas Exchange Physiology Animation ✔✔✔FOR MORE MEDICAL VIDEOS VISIT: http://freemedicalvideos.com/ Website: http://www.medical-institution.com/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Medicalinstit... Twitter: https://twitter.com/USMLE_HighYield This information is intended for educational purposes only, and should not be interpreted as medical advice. Please consult your physician for advice about changes that may affect your health. This Animation video teaches you the basic concept of Gas Exchange Physiology in the respiratory system. What is gas exchange How does gas exchange work Why is gas exchange important Oxygen exchange Respiratory system
Views: 564038 Medical Institution
Gas Exchange in Lungs Made Easy
 
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Gas Exchange Lungs. Dr. Mobeen discusses following topics in this video: Atmospheric gas pressures Water vapor pressure and its effect on the atmospheric pressure Pressure changes during inspiration Composition of the exhaled gases Factors affecting partial pressure of the oxygen Factors affecting partial pressure of the carbon dioxide
Gas exchange
 
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Why do our bodies need to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide with the air, and how do they do it? This video is part of our Body Systems unit. You can find out more about Stile at https://stileeducation.com/ or check out the unit here: https://stileapp.com/au/library/publishers/cosmos-magazine/compilations/cosmos-lessons/5791d5d0-d006-4efb-8974-9294b6b56048
Views: 30231 Stile Education
Biology Help: The Respiratory System - Gas Exchange In The Alveoli Explained In 2 Minutes!!
 
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Check out the following links below! Over 1000+ Medical Questions: http://www.5minuteschool.com DONATE + SUPPORT US: http://paypal.me/5minuteschool Patreon: https://goo.gl/w841fz Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/5MinuteSchool Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/5minuteschool My personal Instagram: http://instagram.com/shahzaebb Contact us: [email protected] ______ ◅ Donate: http://www.5minuteschool.com/donate ◅ Website: htttp://www.5minuteschool.com ◅ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/5minuteschool ◅ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/5minuteschool ◅ Email: [email protected] A very fast explanation of the process of Gas Exchange in the Alveoli
Views: 61157 5MinuteSchool
Respiratory System, part 1: Crash Course A&P #31
 
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So we all know that breathing is pretty important, right? Today we're going to talk about how it works, starting with the nameless evolutionary ancestor that we inherited this from, and continuing to the mechanics of both simple diffusion and bulk flow, as well as the physiology of breathing, and finishing with the anatomy of both the conducting zone and the respiratory zone of your respiratory system. Table of Contents The Mechanics of Both Simple Diffusion and Bulk Flow 2:44 The Physiology of Breathing 4:07 Anatomy of the Conducting Zone 5:47 Anatomy of Respiratory Zone 7:07 *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 2163109 CrashCourse
What do the lungs do? - Emma Bryce
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-do-the-lungs-do-emma-bryce When you breathe, you transport oxygen to the body’s cells to keep them working, while also clearing your system of the carbon dioxide that this work generates. How do we accomplish this crucial and complex task without even thinking about it? Emma Bryce takes us into the lungs to investigate how they help keep us alive. Lesson by Emma Bryce, animation by Andrew Zimbelman for The Foreign Correspondents' Club.
Views: 883168 TED-Ed
Oxygen movement from alveoli to capillaries | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Watch as a molecule of oxygen makes its way from the alveoli (gas layer) through various liquid layers in order to end up in the blood. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-respiratory-system/rn-the-respiratory-system/v/the-respiratory-center?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-respiratory-system/rn-the-respiratory-system/v/fick-s-law-of-diffusion?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 355136 khanacademymedicine
GCSE Science Biology (9-1) Gas exchange in the lungs
 
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In this video, we look at how gases are exchanged in the lungs. We start by looking at the overall structure of the lungs and then explore how the alveoli are adapted for maximum diffusion of gases in and out of the bloodstream. Deliberate Thought by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/?keywords=deliberate+thought Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Image credits: All images were created by and are the property of Autonomy Education Ltd.
Views: 83561 Freesciencelessons
The Respiratory System
 
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Go inside the human body and see first-hand how the respiratory system works. Vivid animation and real-life examples demonstrate the respiration process, including the transfer of oxygen into the bloodstream and the effect of exercise on the respiratory system. From the Australian educational program 'The Body in Motion: An Introduction', Classroom Video, 2010.
Views: 3200153 EducationWithVision
Respiration 3D Medical Animation.wmv
 
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This is a brief animation of ventilation and respiration. It covers the journey of air from the atmosphere to the lungs, and the transfer of oxygen from the alveoli to the red blood cells in the capillaries.
Breathing mechanism & Gas Exchange
 
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Breathing and Gas exchange basics for IB
Views: 117525 Steve Dodd
Lung Anatomy and Physiology | Gas Exchange in the Lungs Respiration Transport Alveoli Nursing
 
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Lung anatomy and physiology of gas exchange in the lung alveoli during respiration nursing lecture. This lecture details the anatomy of the lungs and how gas exchange in the lungs takes place between carbon dioxide and oxygen. The lung is made up of many components that participant in gas exchange. Inhaled air with oxygen enters into the upper respiratory system via the nose or mouth then through the nasal cavities, larynx, and trachea which splits at the carina into the right and left bronchus (primary bronchi). The primary bronchi and pulmonary vein and artery enter into the lungs at the hilum. The pulmonary artery delivers unoxygenated blood to the lungs, and the pulmonary vein delivers oxygenated blood back to the heart. The primary bronchi branches off into the lobar bronchi (also called secondary bronchi) then into the segmental bronchi (also called tetiary bronchi), and then into even smaller areas such as the bronchioles. The bronchioles connect to the alveolar sacs via the alveolar ducts. Gas exchange occurs in the alveolar sac within the alveoli. The alveoli sacs contain capillaries that help with transporting carbon dioxide and oxygen in and out of the body. The pulmonary artery brings unoxygenated blood through the capillary and carbon dioxide transports across the thin capillary wall and is transported out of the body through exhalation. Then the inhaled oxygen transports across the capillary wall onto the red blood cells which is taken via the pulmonary vein back to the heart to replenish the body with fresh oxygenated blood. Other facts about lung anatomy: the right lung has three lobes while the left lung has two lobes. The lung is made up of two layers: visceral pleura (surrounds the lungs) and parietal pleura (attaches to the thoracic cavity). In between these layers, is a small space of fluid that allows the lungs to glide on each other during inhalation and exhalation. Lung A & P quiz: http://www.registerednursern.com/lung-anatomy-and-physiology-quiz/ Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/lung-anatomy-and-physiology-review-notes/ Respiratory Nursing Lectures: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXxyukzyHpqYrJntLbv0aGE Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-career-help/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Personality Types: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 104322 RegisteredNurseRN
What Happens When You Breathe? How The Lungs Work Animation - Respiratory System Gas Exchange  Video
 
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Breathing In (Inhalation) When you breathe in, or inhale, your diaphragm contracts (tightens) and moves downward. This increases the space in your chest cavity, into which your lungs expand. The intercostal muscles between your ribs also help enlarge the chest cavity. They contract to pull your rib cage both upward and outward when you inhale. As your lungs expand, air is sucked in through your nose or mouth. The air travels down your windpipe and into your lungs. After passing through your bronchial tubes, the air finally reaches and enters the alveoli (air sacs). Through the very thin walls of the alveoli, oxygen from the air passes to the surrounding capillaries (blood vessels). A red blood cell protein called hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin) helps move oxygen from the air sacs to the blood. At the same time, carbon dioxide moves from the capillaries into the air sacs. The gas has traveled in the bloodstream from the right side of the heart through the pulmonary artery. Oxygen-rich blood from the lungs is carried through a network of capillaries to the pulmonary vein. This vein delivers the oxygen-rich blood to the left side of the heart. The left side of the heart pumps the blood to the rest of the body. There, the oxygen in the blood moves from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Breathing Out (Exhalation) When you breathe out, or exhale, your diaphragm relaxes and moves upward into the chest cavity. The intercostal muscles between the ribs also relax to reduce the space in the chest cavity. As the space in the chest cavity gets smaller, air rich in carbon dioxide is forced out of your lungs and windpipe, and then out of your nose or mouth. Breathing out requires no effort from your body unless you have a lung disease or are doing physical activity. When you're physically active, your abdominal muscles contract and push your diaphragm against your lungs even more than usual. This rapidly pushes air out of your lungs. How the Lungs and Respiratory System Work You usually don't even notice it, but twelve to twenty times per minute, day after day, you breathe -- thanks to your body's respiratory system. Your lungs expand and contract, supplying life-sustaining oxygen to your body and removing from it, a waste product called carbon dioxide. The Act of Breathing Breathing starts at the nose and mouth. You inhale air into your nose or mouth, and it travels down the back of your throat and into your windpipe, or trachea. Your trachea then divides into air passages called bronchial tubes. For your lungs to perform their best, these airways need to be open during inhalation and exhalation and free from inflammation or swelling and excess or abnormal amounts of mucus. The Lungs As the bronchial tubes pass through the lungs, they divide into smaller air passages called bronchioles. The bronchioles end in tiny balloon-like air sacs called alveoli. Your body has over 300 million alveoli. The alveoli are surrounded by a mesh of tiny blood vessels called capillaries. Here, oxygen from the inhaled air passes through the alveoli walls and into the blood. After absorbing oxygen, the blood leaves the lungs and is carried to your heart. Your heart then pumps it through your body to provide oxygen to the cells of your tissues and organs. As the cells use the oxygen, carbon dioxide is produced and absorbed into the blood. Your blood then carries the carbon dioxide back to your lungs, where it is removed from the body when you exhale. The Diaphragm's Role in Breathing Inhalation and exhalation are the processes by which the body brings in oxygen and expels carbon dioxide. The breathing process is aided by a large dome-shaped muscle under the lungs called the diaphragm. When you breathe in, the diaphragm contracts downward, creating a vacuum that causes a rush of fresh air into the lungs. The opposite occurs with exhalation, where the diaphragm relaxes upwards, pushing on the lungs, allowing them to deflate. Clearing the Air The respiratory system has built-in methods to prevent harmful substances in the air from entering the lungs. Respiratory System Hairs in your nose help filter out large particles. Microscopic hairs, called cilia, are found along your air passages and move in a sweeping motion to keep the air passages clean. But if harmful substances, such as cigarette smoke, are inhaled, the cilia stop functioning properly, causing health problems like bronchitis. Mucus produced by cells in the trachea and bronchial tubes keeps air passages moist and aids in stopping dust, bacteria and viruses, allergy-causing substances, and other substances from entering the lungs. Impurities that do reach the deeper parts of the lungs can often be moved up via mucous and coughed out or swallowed. In the lungs, oxygen and carbon dioxide (a waste product of body processes) are exchanged in the tiny air sacs (alveoli) at the end of the bronchial tubes.
Views: 158114 Science Art
Gas Exchange System Respiratory
 
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gas exchange system repiratory Oxygen and carbon dioxide diffuse between the alveoli and pulmonary capillaries in the lungs, and between the systemic capillaries and cells throughtout the body. The diffusion of these gases, moving in opposite directions, is called gas exchange Other video about System Respiratory Control of Respiration System Respiratory http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lHOQyvWmnw Gas Transport System Respiratory http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsiwGWef2dU Pulmonary Ventilation System Respiratory http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=554DUkghvys Anatomy Respiratory System http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=567QZL5z69k Translated titles: Gasaustauschsystem respiratorisch गैस एक्सचेंज सिस्टम श्वसन Gas uitruilstelsel respiratoriese Gas exchange system respiratory 가스 교환 시스템 호흡기 Sistema de intercambio de gases respiratorio نظام صرف الغاز التنفسي গ্যাস বিনিময় ব্যবস্থা শ্বাসযন্ত্র ग्याँस एक्सचेंज प्रणाली श्वसन گیس ایکسچینج سسٹم تنفس
Views: 9600 Human Physiology
Respiratory System | The Dr. Binocs Show | Learn Videos For Kids
 
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Hey Kids, have you ever wondered what happens after we breathe? How does the air travel inside our body? Well, Dr. Binocs is here to explain it all in today's topic, Respiratory System. The detailed video break-up is given below 00:45 – Role of Oxygen 01:57 – Function of Lungs 03:08 – Trivia time Voice Over Artist - Joseph D'Souza Script Writer & Director - Sreejoni Nag Visual Artist - Pranav Korla Illustrators - Aashka Shah, Pranav Korla Animators - Tushar Ishi, Chandrashekhar Aher VFX Artist - Kushal Bhujbal Background Score - Jay Rajesh Arya Sound Engineer - Mayur Bakshi Creative Head - Sreejoni Nag Producer: Rajjat A. Barjatya Copyrights and Publishing: Rajshri Entertainment Private Limited All rights reserved. Share on Facebook - https://goo.gl/Jp0MCS Tweet about this - https://goo.gl/NcxLZ3 SUBSCRIBE to Peekaboo Kidz:http://bit.ly/SubscribeTo-Peekabookidz Catch Dr.Binocs At - https://goo.gl/SXhLmc To Watch More Popular Nursery Rhymes Go To - https://goo.gl/CV0Xoo To Watch Alphabet Rhymes Go To - https://goo.gl/qmIRLv To Watch Compilations Go To - https://goo.gl/nW3kw9 Catch More Lyricals At - https://goo.gl/A7kEmO Like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/peekabootv
Views: 1137768 Peekaboo Kidz
Gas exchange in the Lungs
 
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Gas exchange in the Lungs
Views: 83122 Daniel Izzo
Mechanism of exchange of gases/very simplified lecture.
 
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The lungs and pulmonary system | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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The pulmonary system including the lungs, larynx, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, alveoli and thoracic diaphragm. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/respiratory-system/gas-exchange-jv/v/alveolar-gas-equation-part-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/respiratory-system/respiratory-system-introduction/v/thermoregulation-in-the-lungs?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 1192734 Khan Academy
Travel of Air Through Respiratory System - Gas Exchange in the Lungs - Nose to Alveoli Pathway
 
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Gas Exchange - Delivery of Oxygen & Elimination of Carbon dioxide - Medical Animation Air first enters the body through the mouth or nose, quickly moves to the pharynx (throat), passes through the larynx (voice box), enters the trachea, which branches into a left and right bronchus within the lungs and further divides into smaller and smaller branches called bronchioles. The smallest bronchioles end in tiny air sacs, called alveoli, which inflate during inhalation, and deflate during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the elimination of carbon dioxide from the bloodstream to the lungs. It occurs in the lungs between the alveoli and a network of tiny blood vessels called capillaries, which are located in the walls of the alveoli. The walls of the alveoli actually share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory system and the bloodstream. Oxygen molecules attach to red blood cells, which travel back to the heart. At the same time, the carbon dioxide molecules in the alveoli are blown out of the body with the next exhalation.
Views: 29468 Science Art
Human Lungs - The Process of Absorbtion of Oxygen
 
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In this video we talk about how oxygen is absorbed by the lungs and the mechanism behind the transfer of the gas to the different tissues in the human body. To know more about the gas exchange in the lungs and the process of respiration you can visit here - https://byjus.com/biology/respiration-gas-exchange/
Views: 1337 BYJU'S
Gas Exchange in Alveoli Animation - Pathway of Air through Respiratory System Video – How Lungs Work
 
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Air first enters the body through the mouth or nose, quickly moves to the pharynx (throat), passes through the larynx (voice box), enters the trachea, which branches into a left and right bronchus within the lungs and further divides into smaller and smaller branches called bronchioles. The smallest bronchioles end in tiny air sacs, called alveoli, which inflate during inhalation, and deflate during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the elimination of carbon dioxide from the bloodstream to the lungs. It occurs in the lungs between the alveoli and a network of tiny blood vessels called capillaries, which are located in the walls of the alveoli. The walls of the alveoli actually share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory system and the bloodstream. Oxygen molecules attach to red blood cells, which travel back to the heart. At the same time, the carbon dioxide molecules in the alveoli are blown out of the body with the next exhalation. The primary function of the respiratory system is to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and reaches the alveoli. The layers of cells lining the alveoli and the surrounding capillaries are each only one cell thick and are in very close contact with each other. This barrier between air and blood averages about 1 micron (1/10,000 of a centimeter, or 0.000039 inch) in thickness. Oxygen passes quickly through this air-blood barrier into the blood in the capillaries. Similarly, carbon dioxide passes from the blood into the alveoli and is then exhaled. Oxygenated blood travels from the lungs through the pulmonary veins and into the left side of the heart, which pumps the blood to the rest of the body (see Biology of the Heart : Function of the Heart). Oxygen-deficient, carbon dioxide-rich blood returns to the right side of the heart through two large veins, the superior vena cava and the inferior vena cava. Then the blood is pumped through the pulmonary artery to the lungs, where it picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. Gas Exchange Between Alveoli and Capillaries: To support the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide, about 5 to 8 liters (about 1.3 to 2.1 gallons) of air per minute are brought in and out of the lungs, and about three tenths of a liter of oxygen is transferred from the alveoli to the blood each minute, even when the person is at rest. At the same time, a similar volume of carbon dioxide moves from the blood to the alveoli and is exhaled. During exercise, it is possible to breathe in and out more than 100 liters (about 26 gallons) of air per minute and extract 3 liters (a little less than 1 gallon) of oxygen from this air per minute. The rate at which oxygen is used by the body is one measure of the rate of energy expended by the body. Breathing in and out is accomplished by respiratory muscles. Air is brought to the alveoli in small doses (called the tidal volume), by breathing in (inhalation) and out (exhalation) through the respiratory airways, a set of relatively narrow and moderately long tubes which start at the nose or mouth and end in the alveoli of the lungs in the chest. Air moves in and out through the same set of tubes, in which the flow is in one direction during inhalation, and in the opposite direction during exhalation. During each inhalation, at rest, approximately 500 ml of fresh air flows in through the nose. Its is warmed and moistened as it flows through the nose and pharynx. By the time it reaches the trachea the inhaled air's temperature is 37 °C and it is saturated with water vapor. On arrival in the alveoli it is diluted and thoroughly mixed with the approximately 2.5–3.0 liters of air that remained in the alveoli after the last exhalation. This relatively large volume of air that is semi-permanently present in the alveoli throughout the breathing cycle is known as the functional residual capacity (FRC). At the beginning of inhalation the airways are filled with unchanged alveolar air, left over from the last exhalation. This is the dead space volume, which is usually about 150 ml. It is the first air to re-enter the alveoli during inhalation. Only after the dead space air has returned to the alveoli does the remainder of the tidal volume (500 ml - 150 ml = 350 ml) enter the alveoli. The entry of such a small volume of fresh air with each inhalation, ensures that the composition of the FRC hardly changes during the breathing cycle.
Views: 29461 AniMed
Alveolar Structure and Gas Exchange
 
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Views: 61418 AK LECTURES
Gaseous exchange between alveoli and capillaries
 
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A little more detail of the exchange of oxygen between alveoli and capillaries
Know more about Exchange Of Gases. NEET Zoology XI Breathing and Exchange of Gases
 
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Know more about Exchange Of Gases. NEET Zoology XI Breathing and Exchange of Gases Exchange of gases in human lungs and tissues: The air reaches the alveoli of the lungs during the inspiration. The atmospheric air contains: Nitrogen - 78% Oxygen - 21 % Carbon dioxide - 0.03% The interchange of gases in the lungs occurs between the blood of the blood capillaries and the air of the alveoli of the lungs. Gases have some properties which are as follows: Gases always diffuse from an area of higher concentration to the area of lower concentration. During respiration the lungs and the respiratory tract are never empty of air. Instead, there is a tidal volume of air (about 500 ml). The total pressure exerted on the walls of the alveoli by the mixture of gases is the same as atmospheric pressure, 760 mm of Hg (millimeters of mercury). Each gas in the mixture exerts a part of the total pressure proportional to its concentration which is called the partial pressure. Table : Partial Pressure of Respiratory Gases (A) Pulmonary Gas Exchange (Gas Exchange in Lungs between alveoli and deoxygenated blood) Diagrammatic representation of exchange of gases at the alveolus and the body tissues with blood and transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide (B) Gas Exchange in Tissues (between oxygenated blood and tissues) Transport of gases in Blood: Blood carries oxygen from the lungs to the heart and from the heart to various body parts. The blood also brings carbon dioxide from the body parts to the heart and then to the lungs. A. Transport of Oxygen: As dissolved gas: About 3% of oxygen in the blood is dissolved in the plasma which carries oxygen to the body cells. As oxyhaemoglobin: About 97% of oxygen is carried in combination with haemoglobin of the erythrocytes. Bohr’s Effect : The relationship between the pCO2 and the percentage saturation of Hb with O2 (or affinity of Hb for O2) is known as Bohr’s effect. increase in pCO2 decrease affinity of Hb for O2 therefore promotes dissociation of Hb(O2)4 → Hb + 4O2.Ø decrease in pCO2 increase affinity of Hb for O2 therefore stimulates association of O2. Hb+ 4O2 → Hb + 4(O2)4. A Diagram of a section of an alveolus with a pulmonary capillary For more such resources go to https://goo.gl/Eh96EY Website: https://www.learnpedia.in/
Views: 8129 Learnpedia
External and Internal Respiration (Gas Exchange) SIMPLIFIED!!!
 
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Get the NEW BLOOD FLOW app with several step-by-step videos several flash cards, quiz questions and notes to make sure you ace your exams!!! Apple Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/blood-flow-through-the-heart/id887089053?mt=8 Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=mobione.cardiacbloodflowpaid Get the ENDOCRINE app with videos on the go for Apple and Andoird devices!!! iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/endocrine/id711858893?mt=8&ls=1 Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/developer?id=John+Roufaiel Preview Video (on YouTube): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLadhgHjcG4&feature=youtu.be Or search for "Endocrine" or "ProfRoofs" or "John Roufaiel" in the medical category. You can find this video and other helpful videos/materials on my website: www.profroofs.com This video introduces the details of external and internal respiration. It was produced in response to a viewer's request who had an upcoming exam. In the near future I hope to add more detail. Please feel free to add suggestions. Thank you.
Views: 145993 Prof. Roofs, MD
Respiratory | Internal Respiration
 
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Ninja Nerds, Join us in this video where we discuss internal respiration, and the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the tissues. ***PLEASE SUPPORT US*** PATREON | https://www.patreon.com/NinjaNerdScience ***EVERY DOLLAR HELPS US GROW & IMPROVE OUR QUALITY*** FACEBOOK | https://www.facebook.com/NinjaNerdScience INSTAGRAM | https://www.instagram.com/ninjanerdscience/ ✎ For general inquiries email us at: [email protected]
Views: 7720 Ninja Nerd Science
gas exchange in the lungs
 
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A mainly audio discription of gas exchange and gas exchange surfaces, focussing on the lungs. Perfect to download and listen 2!!
Views: 57169 SHSscience
GCSE Biology Revision: Breathing
 
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GCSE Biology Revision: Breathing In this video, we look at breathing. We explore how the diaphragm and intercostal muscles work together to ventilate the lungs. We then look at how ventilation increases the diffusion of gases in the alveoli.
Views: 52631 Freesciencelessons
A Quick Review : Gas Exchange In The Lung
 
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This is a quick video showing the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the lungs.
Respiratory System - How The Respiratory System Works
 
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In this video I discuss the basics of the Respiratory System, including how the respiratory system works, I go through the breathing process, and show how breathing works. Transcript We are going to look at the functions of the respiratory system, its components, how the system works, and some things you can do to maintain a healthy respiratory system. The respiratory system’s main functions include, transporting air into and out of the lungs, protecting the body against harmful particles that are inhaled, and it’s most important function, the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. So, its basically about breathing. Now lets take a look at a diagram and we will go through The respiratory systems main components. Starting here with the nose and nasal cavity, the mouth or oral cavity, the pharynx is here and it what we consider the throat. The pharynx is considered part of the digestive system as well as the respiratory system, and it connects the respiratory openings to the larynx and esophagus. The esophagus is not part of the respiratory system, and I will get to why I put it in the diagram in a minute. Next we have the larynx, also called the voice box because the vocal cords are located here. The trachea also called the windpipe, is here, and it connects to the bronchi, which merge into smaller tubes called bronchioles. And, the bronchioles connect to tiny air sacs called alveoli. And then down here is the diaphragm. Now lets go through a very basic look at what happens during the breathing process. So, air is breathed in through the nose or mouth. When it enters through the nose, it gets spread out by these shelf-like things here called conchae. The conchae help humidify the air, and trap some inhaled particles. They also warm the air. The air next passes through the pharynx and enters the trachea. One note here. This little flap like structure is called the epiglottis and it has an important function. During breathing it is pointed upward allowing airflow into the trachea, however, during swallowing it folds down to prevent food from going into the trachea, directing the food into the esophagus. If food does enter the trachea, the gag reflex is induced to protect the respiratory system. The epiglottis here, this little thing shows you how amazing the human body is. Anyways, back to air flow. So, air continues down the trachea and enters the bronchi. From there it enters into smaller bronchioles, and finally into the alveoli, which are surrounded by a network of capillaries. And this folks is where the magic happens. Oxygen enters the alveolar sac and the gas exchange occurs. Capillaries give up their waste carbon dioxide, and pick up the oxygen. Carbon dioxide is then exhaled through the air passage the oxygen was inhaled through, and the oxygen picked up by the blood returns to the heart. During this breathing process the diaphragm is busy as well, contracting as we breath in, which allow the lungs to expand, and relaxing as we exhale. Some minor respiratory disorders include, the common cold, influenza, acute bronchitis, which is inflammation of the bronchi, and pneumonia, which is inflammation of the bronchioles and alveoli. Some of the more damaging disorders include, chronic bronchitis, where the bronchi become inflamed and narrowed, mainly caused by tobacco smoke, emphysema, where the alveoli become overstretched, and lung cancer, which in almost 9 of 10 cases is caused by tobacco smoke. What can you do to maintain or improve respiratory system health? Maintian a healthy weight, excess weight compresses respiratory muscles and puts more stress on your lungs. Drink plenty of water, dehydration can cause the mucus lining your airways to thicken and become sticky, making you more susceptible to illness. Consume foods rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, such as fruits, veggies and nuts, which can help to reduce inflammation and fight oxidative damage. Limit exposure to common allergens such as dust mites, pollen and animal dander. Maintain good hygiene, many respiratory viruses are transmitted because of bad hygiene and poor hand washing. Don’t over consume alcohol, it dehydrates the body and weakens the immune system. Get more active, regular aerobic activity can help our respiratory system. Add indoor plants, plants have been shown to help improve air quality. Bottom line. As you can see the respiratory system has a major impact on overall health, as you may already know, breathing is kind of important. So, eat a healthy diet, maintain an active lifestyle, and keep up good hygiene.
Views: 313263 Whats Up Dude
Gaseous Exchange.mp4
 
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Views: 110947 OSFCPhysEd
Gas Exchange in the Lungs
 
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Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Exchange
Views: 2841 mrscolosia
Anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system
 
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What is the respiratory system? The respiratory system refers to the series of organs responsible for gas exchange in the body. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 351899 Osmosis
GCSE BBC Science Bitesize - Breathing
 
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This GCSE BBC Bitesize video is from the original programmes from 2000 that were broadcast on BBC2. It covers the areas of the Biology foundation paper. Select the, "more from," or type jamjarmmx into your search for the other Biology clips as well as the Physics and Chemistry clips. The Higher clips are also available from this channel. The whole Science GCSE syllabus for Core and Additional Science can be found on this channel.
Views: 94865 JamJarMMX
Respiratory System - Introduction | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
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Your respiratory system is a system in humans that is designed to extract oxygen from the air so we can use it in respiration around the body and at the same time get rid of carbon dioxide gas into the air which is the waste product from respiration. oxygen gas travels through the respiratory system, as you inhale, the molecule is drawn in through the mouth or the nose, it goes into the back of the throat where it enters a tube called the trachea. The tractor or windpipe has special rings of cartilage to keep it open at all times so you can breathe if you are lying down asleep or on a trampoline. The oxygen molecule now travels down the trachea and they will go into either the left or the right lung via a tube called the bronchus. This bronchus then splits into smaller tubes called bronchioles and finally the oxygen molecule will make its way into a tiny air sac called an alveolar, these alveoli are surrounded by tiny blood vessels called capillaries and the oxygen molecule now passes across from the air into the blood via a process of diffusion. At the same time the carbon dioxide molecule goes the other way coming out of the blood and into the alveoli as you exhale. As you exhale the carbon dioxide will take the journey back up the bronchioles a bronchus the trachea and out of the mouth. This happens to millions of molecules with each breath have about 300 million alveoli in each lung. On average, you breathe like this 12 to 16 times a minute. Unlike your digestive system the respiratory system is a dead end. If something bad gets into your lungs it's very hard to get it back out. As usual the body has an answer to look very closely at the cells lining the tracker and the bronchi some of them have tiny little hairs on called cilia and in between these cells are other cells called goblet cells that are secreting mucus. This mucus traps dirt dust and bacteria before entered the lungs. The cilia then what this mucus up into the mouth where it can be swallowed to be killed by your stomach acid. There are many things that can go wrong with your lungs such as asthma, pneumonia and diseases associated with smoking such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. However, if you have a problem a doctor may perform a bronchoscopy. This is when they put a tube with a light and the camera on it into your Airways and look for signs of inflammation or bleeding. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Countercurrent Gas Exchange in Fish Gills
 
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Description of Countercurrent Exchange in fish gills as an example of form relating to function in biology
Views: 290507 Craig Savage
NEET I Biology I Breathing and exchange of gases I Shivani Bhargava (SB) Mam from ETOOSINDIA.COM
 
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Breathing and exchnage of gases video Lecture of Biology for NEET by SB Mam.SB Mam is known for herunique, focused and simplified NEET teaching to bring to students an easy and analytical methodology towards NEET. This course is designed and developed by the experienced faculty of KOTA and www.etoosindia.com. In this lecture SB Mam is giving the detailed view of respiratory tract, larynx, bronchial & respiratory tree. For more videos go to: https://goo.gl/H5FBZV
Views: 398870 Etoos Education
Inflatable Lungs with Diaphragm |  English | Amazing working model
 
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Lungs are like 2, 3 ltr bags in side our bodies. And we can make a working model of the lungs with just a old plastic bottle and some balloons. You can see them inflating and deflating, breathing in and out. The Bottle is your chest , The Vertical of Y notch is the wind pipe, and two wings of Y are small wind pipes or bronchii. Notice these lungs inflate and deflate only when we pull the balloon down. This balloon is diaphragm in our body. When the diaphragm muscles contract the diaphragm contracts and pushes up and deflates the lung. When muscles are relaxed diaphragm comes down and lungs get filled with oxygen. So while lungs inflate and deflate the main driver is diaphragm. To get energy our cells need to burn food. To burn food we need Oxygen.Lungs supply blood with oxygen and take away CO2 from the blood. This happens in side lungs where blood inside capillaries and air inside alveoli (very thin air pipes) come very close. Due to concentration difference of gases between air and blood. Oxygen moves from air to blood and CO2 from blood to air. It is amazing that our lungs have 2400 km long alveoli and about 900 km of blood capillaries where the gas exchange takes place. The total surface area for the gas exchange is about 100 square meters. Imagine all this inside a 3 litre bag. Enjoy this model of lungs and think about our three questions . Why is our left lung smaller ? . DIaphragm muscles are working when we inhale or exhale ? . How is the gas exchange in our lungs affected when we breathe in air full of Carbon Dioxide ? This work was supported by IUCAA and Tata Trust. This film was made by Ashok Rupner TATA Trust: Education is one of the key focus areas for Tata Trusts, aiming towards enabling access of quality education to the underprivileged population in India. To facilitate quality in teaching and learning of Science education through workshops, capacity building and resource creation, Tata Trusts have been supporting Muktangan Vigyan Shodhika (MVS), IUCAA's Children’s Science Centre, since inception. To know more about other initiatives of Tata Trusts, please visit www.tatatrusts.org
Views: 155572 Arvind Gupta
Respiratory System Physiology - Ventilation and Perfusion (V:Q Ratio) Physiology
 
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Where do I get my information from: http://armandoh.org/resource Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105 SPECIAL THANKS: Patreon members
Views: 84441 Armando Hasudungan
The Avian Respiratory System
 
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All Images Copyright © 2013 Kelly Kage
Views: 162119 Kelly Kage
Gaseous Exchange.flv
 
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The main function of the respiratory system is gaseous exchange. This refers to the process of Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide moving between the lungs and blood. Diffusion occurs when molecules move from an area of high concentration (of that molecule) to an area of low concentration.
Views: 333 biochemistryden2
How Your Lungs Work
 
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You breathe in. You breathe out. But what's happening inside? Watch this movie for kids and find out!
Views: 1244863 KidsHealth.org
Respiratory System 8, Trachea and lung disection
 
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You can support the work of campbellteaching, at no cost whatsoever to yourself, if you use the link below as your bookmark to access Amazon. Thank you. If in the US use this link http://goo.gl/mDMfj5 If in the UK use this link http://goo.gl/j0htQ5 A review of the structures and tissues of the respiratory system, with focus on the trachea, plural membranes and lung tissue.
Views: 117464 Dr. John Campbell