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Rational choice-exchange theory | Society and Culture | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Sydney Brown. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/society-and-culture/social-structures/v/social-theories-overview?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/society-and-culture/social-structures/v/feminist-theory?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 100856 khanacademymedicine
social exchange theory relationships
 
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Description and evaluation of social exchange theory
The Economics of Sex
 
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Like the Austin Institute on Facebook: http://bit.ly/AtxInstitute Follow the Austin Institute on Twitter: http://bit.ly/AItweet The Research: http://www.austin-institute.org/ai-research-animates This Research Animate pulls together some of the key sexual economics arguments made by social scientists, including Roy Baumeister, Kathleen Vohs, Timothy Reichert, Mark Regnerus, and George Akerlof. Essential to the mission of the Austin Institute is the dissemination of both thought-provoking and rigorous academic research on family, sexuality, social structures and human relationships. In order to engage a wider audience, we are developing select research projects into a medium amenable to our digital age.
Views: 1839134 The Austin Institute
Dependency Theory
 
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A description of global associated with neo-Marxist theory, particularly in Central and South America. The theory describes how economic elites across states collude to promote their own economic and political interests.
Views: 359325 allensens
Economic anthropology and the exchange of wealth
 
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An introductory talk describing the exchange of wealth as analysed by social anthropologists
Views: 6826 Cambridge University
Income and Wealth Inequality: Crash Course Economics #17
 
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Inequality is a big, big subject. There's racial inequality, gender inequality, and lots and lots of other kinds of inequality. This is Econ, so we're going to talk about wealth inequality and income inequality. There's no question that economic inequality is real. But there is disagreement as to whether income inequality is a problem, and what can or should be done about it. *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 928714 CrashCourse
Floating vs. Fixed Exchange Rates- Macroeconomics 5.4
 
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Float it or fix it? Mr. Clifford expalins the difference between floating and fixed exchange rates and how countries peg the value of their currency to another currency. Make sure to watch this video first: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DVYVfI81R8
Views: 312457 Jacob Clifford
EC232.L11.OpenEconomyEquilibriumIntuition
 
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Here we discuss the various models that make up equilibrium in an open economy for both the real interest rate and the real exchange rate.
Views: 5810 Joshua Owens
Marshall Lerner Condition and J Curve Effect
 
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Marshall Lerner Condition and J Curve Effect - An in depth look at the Marshall Lerner condition and J curve effect in determining whether a fall in the exchange will improve a country's current account position
Views: 104658 EconplusDal
Economic Schools of Thought: Crash Course Economics #14
 
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We talk a lot about Keynesian economics on this show, pretty much because the real world currently runs on Keynesian principles. That said, there are some other economic ideas out there, and today we're going to talk about a few of them. So, if you've been aching to hear about socialism, communism, the Chicago School, or the Austrian School, this episode is for you. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 890680 CrashCourse
Economics and Social Democracy
 
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The Friedrich Ebert Stiftung’s Academy for Social Democracy explains the economic policy of social democracy.
Social Mobility: Crash Course Sociology #26
 
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Today we’re exploring social mobility in some more depth. We’ll look at intergenerational and intragenerational mobility and the difference between absolute and relative mobility. We’ll go over the long run upward social mobility trends in the United States, as well as recent declines in absolute social mobility. We’ll also explore how opportunities for social mobility differ by class, race, and gender. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html *** References: Sociology by John J. Macionis, 15th edition (2014) Measuring relative mobility, part https://www.brookings.edu/blog/social-mobility-memos/2015/04/28/measuring-relative-mobility-part-2/ Five Bleak Facts on Black Opportunity https://www.brookings.edu/blog/social-mobility-memos/2015/01/15/five-bleak-facts-on-black-opportunity/ Pay Equity & Discrimination https://iwpr.org/issue/employment-education-economic-change/pay-equity-discrimination/ In the U.S. and abroad, more young adults are living with their parents http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/05/24/in-the-u-s-and-abroad-more-young-adults-are-living-with-their-parents/
Views: 129223 CrashCourse
The Real Adam Smith: Ideas That Changed The World - Full Video
 
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The Real Adam Smith: A Personal Exploration by Johan Norberg, takes an intriguing, two-part look at Smith and the evolution and relevance of his ideas today, both economic and ethical. It’s difficult to imagine that a man who lived with horse drawn carriages and sailing ships would foresee our massive 21st century global market exchange, much less the relationship between markets and morality. But Adam Smith was no ordinary 18th century figure. Considered the “father of modern economics,” Smith was first and foremost a moral philosopher. The revolutionary ideas he penned in The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments, changed the world. Norberg explores Smith’s insights regarding free trade and the nature of wealth to the present, where they are thriving and driving the world’s economy. In the second hour, Ideas That Changed The World, Norberg traces Smith’s insights regarding the benefits of free trade and the nature of wealth to the present, where they are currently in operation. He talks with some of the most distinguished Adam Smith scholars, as well as leaders of some of the world’s most admired companies to discover how Smith’s ideas continue to be relevant and drive the global economy today. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv Learn more about Adam Smith here: http://therealadamsmithfilm.com
Views: 472348 Free To Choose Network
Measuring your social impact: Theory of Change
 
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The Theory of Change forms the backbone of any social impact measurement system. It links the day to day activities in your organisation to your overall mission or long term goals. This is a key step in deciding what you will need to measure to evidence your social impact. Produced by the Social Investment Business and the Good Analyst. More information available at www.sibgroup.org.uk/impact
Social Exchange Theory
 
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Lovely little discussion about social aspects of Youtube, and sociology-related topics. Whoa! Intelligent conversation? NEVER!!!
Views: 5893 jackbauerpowerhour
Globalization and Trade and Poverty: Crash Course Economics #16
 
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What is globalization? Is globalization a good thing or not. Well, I have an answer that may not surprise you: It's complicated. This week, Jacob and Adriene will argue that globalization is, in aggregate, good. Free trade and globalization tend to provide an overall benefit, and raises average incomes across the globe. The downside is that it isn't good for every individual in the system. In some countries, manufacturing jobs move to places where labor costs are lower. And some countries that receive the influx of jobs aren't prepared to deal with it, from a regulatory standpoint. Anyway, Jacob and Adriene can explain the whole thing to you in 10 minutes. *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 715473 CrashCourse
The Ricardian Model Simply Explained in 5 Minutes
 
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This is a simple and easy explanation of the Ricardian Model for students and people who are interestes. Have fun Intro by CrYpTa ™
Theories About Family & Marriage: Crash Course Sociology #37
 
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Today we’ll explore how sociology defines family and the different terms used to describe specific types of family. We’ll look at marriage in different societies, as well as marital residential patterns and patterns of descent. And, of course, we’ll go over the three sociological schools of thought on the societal role of marriage and family. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/catalog/desktop.html *** References: Sociology by John J. Macionis, 15th edition (2014) *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Jessica Wode, Cami Wilson, Eric Prestemon, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Tom Trval, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Kathrin Janßen, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Jason A Saslow, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 162654 CrashCourse
Gift and reciprocity: the anthropologists’ and new economists’ visIon-- Lecture 10
 
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This is lecture 10 in Session 3 of the course Mastering Money entitled: Gift and reciprocity: the anthropologists' and new economists’ vision General references 1) Mauss "The Gift" https://erikbuys.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/the-gift-marcel-mauss.pdf 2) Fehr et Gächter "The Economics of Reciprocity" https://people.hss.caltech.edu/~camerer/NYU/07-FehrGachter+.pdf 3) Shiksha "Reclaiming the Gift Culture" http://www.swaraj.org/shikshantar/giftculture.pdf 4) Joe Vitale "The Greatest Money-Making Secret in History" https://www.google.fr/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwjB2J2x_5jWAhXGAcAKHS32D-IQFggoMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fsites.google.com%2Fsite%2Fjwheat42%2Fgreatestmms.pdf&usg=AFQjCNE-rdCsj0SCaoTOxb3GSPX3lDoV4g 5) Donner aux pauvres sans contrepartie (in french) http://www.lemonde.fr/economie/video/2017/10/17/pourquoi-il-faut-donner-de-l-argent-aux-pauvres-sans-contrepartie_5202154_3234.html#xtor=AL-32280270 Video references: 1) Self-service bookstore in China https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56mhuA6zhuc 2) Jean-François Noubel (in french) "Commerce et Don" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Afpq8gxhZp0 5) Honor's payment/giving (in french) http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/l_epicerie/2012-2013/reportage.asp?idDoc=288208 .
Views: 670 Dr. Chris Faugère
5 6 Exchange and Economic Systems 1  Reciprocity
 
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Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/YAcb/
Views: 1178 Miami E-Learning
Game Theory and Oligopoly: Crash Course Economics #26
 
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Would you like to play a game, Dr. Falken? Actually, this episode isn't really about games, or Matthew Broderick, or Thermonuclear War. But enough with the long references to 1983's best movie, War Games. Today Jacob and Adriene are going to teach you about Oligopolies, which are kind of like the monopolies that we talked about last week, except with more companies involved. Then we'll get to the games, or rather, the game theory. Which is all about how companies try to compete with each other in the real world. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 765366 CrashCourse
Aspects of International Relations: International Political Economy
 
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Featuring academics from the International Relations Department at the LSE, ‘Aspects of IR: International Political Economy’ is a short film about the study of international political economy, particularly at the LSE. The film looks at what we study, and why, and also at the major themes in IPE, such as the financial crisis, climate change and globalisation of markets. It debates how IPE fits into IR, and the rewards and value of studying IPE. Contributors: Dr Julia Gray, Dr James Morrison, Dr Stephen Woolcock For further information please visit: http://www.lse.ac.uk/internationalRelations
Theories of Global Stratification: Crash Course Sociology #28
 
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Today we’ll discuss two theories of global stratification. First, we’ll go over modernization theory and Walt Rostow’s Four Stages of Modernization. Next, we’ll explain dependency theory, the legacy of colonialism, and Immanuel Wallerstein’s Capitalist World Economy Model. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html *** CC World History #23: The Columbian Exchange https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQPA5oNpfM4 CC World History #33: Capitalism and Socialism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3u4EFTwprM CC Sociology course textbook: Sociology by John J. Macionis, 15th edition (2014) *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Bob Kunz, mark austin, William McGraw, Ruth Perez, Jason A Saslow, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Eric Prestemon, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, Thomas Frank, Rachel Bright, Khaled El Shalakany, Ian Dundore, Tim Curwick, Ken Penttinen, Indika Siriwardena, Alexander Tamas, Caleb Weeks, Kathrin Janßen, Nathan Taylor, Andrei Krishkevich, Brian Thomas Gossett, Chris Peters, Kathy & Tim Philip, Mayumi Maeda, Eric Kitchen, SR Foxley, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Tom Trval, Cami Wilson, Justin Zingsheim, Moritz Schmidt, Jessica Wode, Daniel Baulig, Jirat -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 104841 CrashCourse
Economic Model
 
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Tom Mershon Professor Routh Communications Persuasive Speach YouTube Speach Curitiba, Brazil Google
Views: 11 Thomas Mershon
Impact of Exchange Rate Appreciations and Depreciations with Evaluation
 
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Exchange Rate Changes Impacts (Appreciation and Depreciation) - The impacts of appreciations and depreciations of an exchange rate with evaluation
Views: 50935 EconplusDal
Human Capital & Conditional Convergence
 
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In our previous macroeconomics video, we said that the accumulation of physical capital only provides a temporary boost to economic growth. Does the same apply to human capital? To answer that, consider this: what happens to all new graduates, in the end? For a while, they’re productive members of the economy. Then age takes its toll, retirement rolls around, and eventually, the old workforce is replaced with a new infusion of people. But then, the cycle restarts. You get a new workforce, everyone’s productive for a while, and then they too retire. Does this ring a bell? It should, because this is similar to the depreciation faced by physical capital. Similarly, are there diminishing returns to education? It likely wouldn’t pay off for everyone to have a PhD, or for everyone to master Einstein’s great theories. That means the logic of diminishing returns, and the idea of a steady state, also applies to human capital. So, now we can revise our earlier statement. Now we can say that the accumulation of any kind of capital, only provides a temporary boost in economic growth. This is because all kinds of capital rust. So, one way or another, we’ll reach a point where new investments can only offset depreciation. It’s the steady state, all over again. However, what does the journey to steady state look like? The Solow model predicts that poor countries should eventually catch up to rich countries, especially since they’re growing from a lower base. And given their quicker accumulation of capital, poorer nations should also grow faster, than their more developed neighbors. And eventually, every country should reach similar steady states. In other words, we would see growth tracks that all eventually converge. So, why isn’t this always the case? Why, in some cases, are we seeing “Divergence, Big time,” as coined by economist Lant Pritchett? The answer to these questions, lies in the institutions of different countries and the incentives they create. Assuming that a certain set of countries do have similar institutions, that’s where we see the convergence predicted by the Solow model. We see that poorer countries do grow faster than their richer counterparts. And conditional on having similar institutions, eventually, even poorer countries will reach a similar steady state of output as more developed nations. We call this phenomenon conditional convergence. You can think of it as a national game of catch-up, with catch-up only happening if institutions don’t differ. What happens though, once all this catching up is done? Let’s not forget that there’s still another variable in the Solow model. This is variable A: ideas -- the subject of our next video. There, we’ll show you how ideas can keep a country moving along the cutting edge of growth. Catch up on the Solow model: Introduction to the Solow model: http://bit.ly/1SMud3G Physical Capital and Diminishing Returns: http://bit.ly/1SpLT31 The Solow Model and the Steady State: http://bit.ly/233vDGw Office Hours video on the Solow model: http://bit.ly/1VQ8XLe Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1NwAtKJ Next video: http://bit.ly/1SHvrdp Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/IR1M/
Social exclusion (segregation and social isolation) | Social Inequality | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Arshya Vahabzadeh. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/social-inequality/social-class/v/environmental-justice?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/social-inequality/social-class/v/social-reproduction?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 79225 khanacademymedicine
Currency Politics: The Political Economy of Exchange Rate Policy
 
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Recorded April 20, 2017 Jeffry Frieden, Harvard University Professor of Government, discusses the political economy of exchange rate policy. By Jeffry Frieden’s account, the exchange rate of a currency is the single most important price in any economy, yet is subject to political pressure and rarely set by solely economic considerations. Currency policy involves significant economic trade-offs that implicate powerful interests in society, but which set of interests predominates varies greatly across time and space. Drawing on examples like the gold standard in the nineteenth century, European monetary integration, and Latin American currency choice and crises, Frieden explains the development of monetary policy within the shifting global economic and political order. Learn more: http://cissr.uchicago.edu/events/170420-jeffry-frieden-on-currency-politics/ -- The University of Chicago Center for International Social Science Research is an eclectic intellectual community devoted to nourishing empirical international research across the social sciences. We seek to spark and sustain critical discussions that traverse disciplinary, methodological, and geographic boundaries. CISSR advances social science research that informs and transforms debates on global issues within the academy and beyond. http://cissr.uchicago.edu
Views: 1831 UChicagoCISSR
Monetary and Fiscal Policy: Crash Course Government and Politics #48
 
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Today, Craig is going to dive into the controversy of monetary and fiscal policy. Monetary and fiscal policy are ways the government, and most notably the Federal Reserve, influences the economy - for better or for worse. So we’re going to start by looking at monetary policy, and specifically how the Federal Reserve uses interests rates as a means of controlling (or at least attempting to control) inflation. We’ll then move onto fiscal policy - that is the government’s use of taxation to raise and spend money. It’s all, well, pretty controversial, but as it seems Americans hate taxes the most, monetary policy is most often used - meaning that the Federal Reserve plays a hugely significant role in steering the U.S. economy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 411122 CrashCourse
Multiplier Effect and Accelerator
 
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Multiplier Effect and Accelerator Effects - A look at the multiplier effect and accelerator effects in detail
Views: 109577 EconplusDal
Micro Unit 1 Summary- Basic Economic Concepts
 
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The Micro Unit 1 Summary video is designed to help you understand economics and goes hand-in-hand with my Ultimate Review Packet. In this video I cover the basics: scarcity, opportunity cost, the economic systems, the production possibilities curve, and comparative advatage. I also show you the quick and dirty (22:22). Don't worry, it's school appropriate. Thanks for watching and please subscribe. The Ultimate Review Packet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxBL54a3-QQ Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 899139 Jacob Clifford
Macroeconomics- Everything You Need to Know
 
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In this video I quickly cover all the concepts and graph that you will see in an AP macroeconomics or college-level introductory macroeconomics course. Dn't take notes. Just get the big picture. *Note* At 25:48, the signs are reversed. I talk about scarcity, opportunity cost, the PPC, comparative advantage, supply and demand, GDP, unemployment, inflation, aggregate demand and supply, LRAS, Phillips Curve, economic growth, fiscal policy, money, banking, monetary policy, the Money Market, loanable funds, the balance of payments, and exchange rates. Wow! That's a lot of stuff. Good luck on your test! Get the Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 976807 Jacob Clifford
Social Theory of Hoppe, Week 6: Economic Issues and Applications Q&A
 
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This six-week course will present and discuss Professor Hoppe's most important ideas and theories, including his brilliant critique of positivist methodology as applied to the social sciences, his groundbreaking "argumentation ethics" praxeological approach to political philosophy, his encompassing comparative analysis of socialism and capitalism, his profound critique of democracy, and a host of other insights and contributions to areas such as monopoly theory, the theory of public goods, the sociology of taxation, the private production of security, immigration, the nature of property and scarcity, economic methodology and epistemology, and the evolution of monetary institutions and their impact on international relations. This course will be taught by Austro-libertarian legal philosopher Stephan Kinsella, who has been a close associate of Professor Hoppe for 17 years. Kinsella is uniquely qualified to teach this course, as he served as Book Review Editor of the JLS for five years under Hoppe's editorship; he founded and edits Libertarian Papers, the successor journal to the JLS; and, with Guido Hülsmann, was editor of the festschrift in Hoppe's honor, Property, Freedom, and Society: Essays in Honor of Hans-Hermann Hoppe (Mises Institute, 2009). Kinsella's previous Mises Academy courses include Rethinking Intellectual Property and Libertarian Legal Theory. SLIDES: https://docs.google.com/present/view?id=dgp7mzbr_520dt38c7dp STUDY MATERIALS: N/A Feel free to leave questions in the comment section below. (Originally posted at: http://www.libertarianstandard.com/2012/01/01/kinsellas-the-social-theory-of-hoppe-course-audio-and-slides/ )
Views: 195 gdmk1000
Foreign Exchange Practice- Macro Practice- Macro 5.3
 
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In this video I explain foreign exchange and how the value of currencies change. Remember that the trick is to remember that you supply your currency and the people in other countries demand your currency. Thanks for watching.
Views: 240241 Jacob Clifford
Fundamentals of Economic Analysis, Lecture 2: Exchange and Demand | Joseph T. Salerno
 
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Joseph T. Salerno and Peter G. Klein are two of the most productive microeconomists in the Austrian School today. This seminar provides an introduction to Austrian Economics, and offers a preview of their forthcoming study for graduate students. Presented at the Ludwig von Mises Institute on June 11-15, 2007. Includes an introduction by Mark Thornton. http://mises.org Playlist for complete lecture series: http://tinyurl.com/y6phrvzl * * * * * Joseph T. Salerno is an economist of the Austrian School who resides in the United States. A professor at Pace University, Salerno is an active scholar in the areas of banking and monetary theory, comparative economics, and the history of economic thought. He is a senior faculty member of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, for which he frequently lectures and writes, and he serves as editor of the Institute's Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics. Links to selected online resources on Austrian Economics: Human Action: A Treatise on Economics https://tinyurl.com/yapklreq Audio version: https://tinyurl.com/ab8wx88 Man, Economy, and State: A Treatise on Economics http://tinyurl.com/y8zg569h Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/axhdzg3 The Austrian School of Economics: A History of Its Ideas, Ambassadors, and Institutions https://tinyurl.com/yagraqj3 Audio version: https://tinyurl.com/y9ajba8k Economic Thought Before Adam Smith: An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, Vol. I http://tinyurl.com/ngqzfup Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/a3obfgu Classical Economics: An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, Vol. II http://tinyurl.com/np6a898 Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/bd44b6s Theory and History: An Interpretation of Social and Economic Evolution https://tinyurl.com/q9kf6jq Audio version: https://tinyurl.com/aa7gyv2 Economic Science and the Austrian Method https://tinyurl.com/y8lgyzta Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/y2xytrbb The Austrian Theory of the Trade Cycle and Other Essays http://tinyurl.com/yaz8cblv Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/yy2gg4y9 Mises: The Last Knight of Liberalism http://tinyurl.com/y2skpf6h Audio version: http://tinyurl.com/ajaywkh A Primer on Austrian Economics http://tinyurl.com/33gupnk Ludwig von Mises and the Austrian School of Economics http://tinyurl.com/yavecrju Historical Setting of the Austrian School of Economics https://tinyurl.com/ycaddq85 Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow https://tinyurl.com/ydyj253c Mises and Austrian Economics http://tinyurl.com/yynktdde Philosophical and Ethical Implications of Austrian Economics http://tinyurl.com/yaxz4stm Praxeology: The Methodology of Austrian Economics https://tinyurl.com/pf46rtk Misesian Praxeology https://tinyurl.com/yd9bz3ej The Cultural Thought of Ludwig von Mises https://tinyurl.com/y7y8kbgo The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics https://tinyurl.com/y8z4sf59 Mises's Epistemology https://tinyurl.com/ycna45o9 The Philosophical Contributions of Ludwig von Mises http://tinyurl.com/yc9u4ju7 The Austrian Theory of Money https://tinyurl.com/y8gqjnwr The Austrian School's Critique of Marxism http://tinyurl.com/y84g9g7j Money, Method, and the Market Process https://tinyurl.com/ydaypg2k Economic Calculation http://tinyurl.com/y5gzqd9q Epistemological Relativism in the Sciences of Human Action https://tinyurl.com/y986vfvj Economic Freedom and Interventionism https://tinyurl.com/yau35t2o The Anti-Capitalistic Mentality https://tinyurl.com/qbwery7 Capitalism, Happiness, and Beauty https://tinyurl.com/yao35ywc Liberty and Property https://tinyurl.com/y7b8ta5h Middle-of-the-Road Policy Leads to Socialism https://tinyurl.com/ybdexds8 The Free Market and Its Enemies https://tinyurl.com/nky7aco Liberalism: In the Classical Tradition https://tinyurl.com/y7bp83ej Nation, State, and Economy https://tinyurl.com/ycjere4t Ludwig von Mises: Defender of Capitalism https://tinyurl.com/ycplhhwj Principles of Economics http://tinyurl.com/yyzc8hts Value, Cost, and Marginal Utility http://tinyurl.com/y2ry5jrw Methodology of the Austrian School Economists http://tinyurl.com/y9zr25pp The Place of Human Action in the Development of Modern Economic Thought http://tinyurl.com/y8kef5b6 Austrian Macroeconomics: A Diagrammatical Exposition http://tinyurl.com/y9gn3eug Why Austrian Economics Matters http://tinyurl.com/ycqwjzt7 Austrian Economics as Extraordinary Science http://tinyurl.com/y8dogk5h Monetary Theory and the Trade Cycle http://tinyurl.com/yxhyrmht The Pure Theory of Capital http://tinyurl.com/y5tvroq3 * * * * * DISCLAIMER: This media presentation is owned by the Ludwig von Mises Institute and is protected under Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ This YouTube channel is in no way endorsed by or affiliated with the Mises Institute, any of its scholars or staff members.
Views: 4797 LibertyInOurTime
Supply and Demand: Crash Course Economics #4
 
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In which Adriene Hill and Jacob Clifford teach you about one of the fundamental economic ideas, supply and demand. What is supply and demand? Well, you’ll have to watch the video to really understand it, but it’s kind of important for everything economically. Supply and demand sets prices, and indicates to manufacturers how much to produce. Also, it has a lot to do with strawberries. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1731961 CrashCourse
Mercantilism explained
 
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Get the accompanying notes for this video at teachsocialstudies.com.
Views: 143542 Teach Social Studies
CITRIS Research Exchange, 3/13/2019: Sera Linardi
 
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Designing Microbehavioral Research for Practical Social Innovation Sera Linardi Associate Professor of Economics Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), University of Pittsburgh About the talk: PittSmartLiving (PSL) is a $1.4M 3-year National Science Foundation project hosted in University of Pittsburgh to reduce public transit congestion by designing a market that connects rush hours travelers with time-sensitive local business discounts. This project is currently organized within three research labs: Data & Systems, Human Behavior, and Business Integration. In this talk, we will look at the research taking place in the PSL Human Behavior Laboratory, which uses economic theory, experiments, simulations, and interviews to build a social science framework for the larger interdisciplinary collaboration. About the Speaker: Sera Linardi is an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) at the University of Pittsburgh, where she directs the PittSmartLiving Human Behavior Laboratory. She received her Ph.D. in Social Science at the California Institute of Technology after working as a computer scientist at Adobe Systems. She bridges academic research and practical challenges in public/social services provision, specifically around prosocial behavior, information aggregation, and behavior economics of the poor. Her research has been published in economics, management, and political science journals (Journal of Public Economics, Management Science, Games and Economic Behavior, British Journal of Political Science) and won the 2016 Midwest Political Science Association Best Paper in Comparative Politics Award. Her work is currently supported by the NSF and the Heinz Endowment. About the Series: Launched in 2008, the CITRIS Research Exchange delivers fresh perspectives on information technology and society from distinguished academic, industry, and civic leaders. Join us this spring to celebrate 10 years of innovative ideas and dialogue. Learn more about CITRIS and the Banatao Institute at the University of California.
Views: 171 CITRIS
Externalities- EconMovies #7: Anchorman
 
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Hey econ students. This is Jacob Clifford. In this episode of EconMovies, I use Anchorman to explain marginal benefit, marginal cost, efficiency, and externalities. Good luck studying economics. Stay classy econ students?!
Views: 110992 Jacob Clifford
The Circular Flow Model of a Market Economy
 
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By this point in your course you may have learned the definition of a market: A place where buyers and sellers meet to engage in mutually beneficial exchanges. But what is a market economy? Two basic types of markets exist in any market economy: resource markets and product markets. The exchanges that take place in these markets benefit both the households and the firms that engage in exchanges. This lesson will introduce the circular flow of money, resources and goods and services in a market economy. We will examine how resources flow from households to firms, and goods and services from firms to households. We will also seek to explain why individuals are willing to engage in the exchanges that characterize the market system. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 344660 Jason Welker
Economic Theories to Find the Right Person, Project or Job
 
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This Stanford Graduate School of Business (GSB) webinar looks at the unlikely intersection of online dating and economic theory, exploring what the market for life partners can teach us about other markets where finding the right “match” is the key to success. Stanford GSB Professor Paul Oyer, author of Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Dating, explains how the Nobel Prize-winning ideas of Thick Markets, Signaling, and Search Theory can help in your hunt for the right employee, the right job, the right project, or the right person with whom to spend your life. In this one-hour session, Professor Oyer shows you how to cut through the overload of information and misinformation as he takes you through finding the right match in three steps: Choosing your Market, Presenting Yourself, and Making a Choice.
Property - Intro to Political Economy, Lecture3
 
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https://sites.duke.edu/intrope/ COURSE OVERVIEW: Introduction to Political Economy is a self-contained and nontechnical overview of the intellectual history of political economy, the logic of microeconomics, and the definitions used in macroeconomics. It introduces the notion of a political economy, emphasizing the moral and ethical problems that markets solve, and fail to solve. LECTURE OVERVIEW: 1. Is economics a science? 2. Do institutions evolve (coyotes), or emerge from conscious choice (chihuahuas)? Another example is also given, comparing Jewish dietary and food preparation rules with "modern" food handling rules based on a theory of germ pathology. They are surprisingly similar, showing that there are at least two paths to development of rules. 3. The briefest statement of the best argument for capitalism is NOT greed, it's not self-interest It's the relation between property, voluntary exchange, and price. These have a connected set of consequentialist and natural rights implications. No way to evaluate them separately, because they can't really be disconnected. 4. The political theories of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau are discussed, and the implications for the morality and importance of property described. 5. Does your dog own your house? 6. Two court cases are discussed: (a) Hinman v. Pacific Air (1936) and (b) Jacques v. Steenberg Homes (1997). The implications for our understanding, and the social status, of property, is discussed. READINGS: Locke, John. Second Treatise on Government, Chapter 5, “On Property,” (http://www.constitution.org/jl/2ndtr05.htm ) (OPTIONAL: Background on Locke, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. (http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/locke-political/ ) Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. “Discourse on Inequality,” Part II. (http://www.constitution.org/jjr/ineq_04.htm ) (OPTIONAL: Background on Rousseau, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/rousseau/) Schmidtz, David. 1994. “The Institution of Property.” Social Philosophy and Policy. 11:42-62. (http://davidschmidtz.com/sites/default/files/research- paper/3/InstitutionProperty2012.pdf) Hinman v. Pacific Air Transport, 1936, 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals. (http://www.leagle.com/xmlResult.aspx?xmldoc=193683984F2d755_1600.xml&docbase=CSLWAR1- 1950-1985) Jacques v. Steenberg Homes, Inc., 1997, Wisconsin. (http://www.wicourts.gov/sc/opinion/DisplayDocument.pdf?content=pdf&seqNo=17010 ) Hardin, Garrett. 1969. “Tragedy of the Commons.” Science. (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/162/3859/1243.full ) Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for more! Follow us at https://twitter.com/dukepolisci Like us at https://facebook.com/dukepolisci Follow us at https://instagram.com/dukepolisci Produced by Shaun King, Duke University Department of Political Science Multimedia Specialist
What is a gift economy? - Alex Gendler
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-is-a-gift-economy-alex-gendler What if, this holiday season, instead of saying "thank you" to your aunt for her gift of a knitted sweater, the polite response expected from you was to show up at her house in a week with a better gift? Or to vote for her in the town election? Or let her adopt your firstborn child? Alex Gendler explains how all of these things might not sound so strange if you were involved in a gift economy. Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Avi Ofer.
Views: 277126 TED-Ed
Kidney Exchange: Algorithms and Incentives
 
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Alvin Roth, Stanford University Algorithmic Game Theory and Practice https://simons.berkeley.edu/talks/alvin-roth-2015-11-16
Views: 2619 Simons Institute
#44, Concepts of national income | Class 12 macroeconomics |
 
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Class 12th macroeconomics...... National income and related aggregates.... Different introductory concepts of national income..... Domestic Territory..... Normal residents..... Citizen.... Factor income... Transfer income... Contact for my book(micro+macro)..7690041256 Economics on your tips video 44 Our books are now available on Amazon Economics on your tips Macroeconomics ( new edition ) https://www.amazon.in/dp/B07R561YKH/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_3wVXCbE2Z9DZE Economics on your tips Microeconomics http://amzn.in/d/cZykZVK Official series of playlists UG courses ( bcom, bba, bca, ba, honours) – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGirAqOr-hU8e-N_Nz0UpgJ- Micro economics complete course – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg5n3YU6oEV7_HIzBuEbbOz Macro economics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg2ORORpILqiDR1gyH3MkXw Statistics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjrAkDyeMioJ7DEexAEeVdt National income – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjpE-1V4uz_0wvvbZQnSsj_ In order to promote us and help us grow Paytm on - 7690041256
Views: 963540 Economics on your tips
What is RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY? What does RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY mean?
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ GET FREE BITCOINS just for surfing the web as you usually do - https://bittubeapp.com/?ref?2JWO9YEAJ ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY? What does RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY mean? RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY meaning - RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY definition - RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Rational choice theory, also known as choice theory or rational action theory, is a framework for understanding and often formally modeling social and economic behavior. The basic premise of rational choice theory is that aggregate social behavior results from the behavior of individual actors, each of whom is making their individual decisions. The theory also focuses on the determinants of the individual choices (methodological individualism). Rational choice theory then assumes that an individual has preferences among the available choice alternatives that allow them to state which option they prefer. These preferences are assumed to be complete (the person can always say which of two alternatives they consider preferable or that neither is preferred to the other) and transitive (if option A is preferred over option B and option B is preferred over option C, then A is preferred over C). The rational agent is assumed to take account of available information, probabilities of events, and potential costs and benefits in determining preferences, and to act consistently in choosing the self-determined best choice of action. Rationality is widely used as an assumption of the behavior of individuals in microeconomic models and analyses and appears in almost all economics textbook treatments of human decision-making. It is also used in political science, sociology, and philosophy. A particular version of rationality is instrumental rationality, which involves seeking the most cost-effective means to achieve a specific goal without reflecting on the worthiness of that goal. Gary Becker was an early proponent of applying rational actor models more widely. Becker won the 1992 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his studies of discrimination, crime, and human capital. The concept of rationality used in rational choice theory is different from the colloquial and most philosophical use of the word. Colloquially, "rational" behaviour typically means "sensible", "predictable", or "in a thoughtful, clear-headed manner." Rational choice theory uses a narrower definition of rationality. At its most basic level, behavior is rational if it is goal-oriented, reflective (evaluative), and consistent (across time and different choice situations). This contrasts with behavior that is random, impulsive, conditioned, or adopted by (unevaluative) imitation. Early neoclassical economists writing about rational choice, including William Stanley Jevons, assumed that agents make consumption choices so as to maximize their happiness, or utility. Contemporary theory bases rational choice on a set of choice axioms that need to be satisfied, and typically does not specify where the goal (preferences, desires) comes from. It mandates just a consistent ranking of the alternatives.:501 Individuals choose the best action according to their personal preferences and the constraints facing them. E.g., there is nothing irrational in preferring fish to meat the first time, but there is something irrational in preferring fish to meat in one instant and preferring meat to fish in another, without anything else having changed. Rational choice theorists do not claim that the theory describes the choice process, but rather that it predicts the outcome and pattern of choices. An assumption often added to the rational choice paradigm is that individual preferences are self-interested, in which case the individual can be referred to as a homo economicus. Such an individual acts as if balancing costs against benefits to arrive at action that maximizes personal advantage. Proponents of such models, particularly those associated with the Chicago school of economics, do not claim that a model's assumptions are an accurate description of reality, only that they help formulate clear and falsifiable hypotheses. In this view, the only way to judge the success of a hypothesis is empirical tests. To use an example from Milton Friedman, if a theory that says that the behavior of the leaves of a tree is explained by their rationality passes the empirical test, it is seen as successful.
Views: 33416 The Audiopedia