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The Articles of Confederation - Becoming the United States - Extra History - #1
 
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When the thirteen colonies of North America broke away from Great Britain, they struggled to draft their first constitution. After great debate, they created the Articles of Confederation and formed the United States of America. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon (--More below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 869476 Extra Credits
Confederation  Definition for Kids
 
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A brief definition of Confederation or Confederacy for kids in early American History.
Views: 4202 History Illustrated
The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the United States Constitution. During and after the American Revolutionary War, the government of the new country operated under the Articles of Confederation. While these Articles got the young nation through its war with England, they weren't of much use when it came to running a country. So, the founding fathers decided try their hand at nation-building, and they created the Constitution of the United States, which you may remember as the one that says We The People at the top. John will tell you how the convention came together, some of the compromises that had to be made to pass this thing, and why it's very lucky that the framers installed a somewhat reasonable process for making changes to the thing. You'll learn about Shays' Rebellion, the Federalist Papers, the elite vs rabble dynamic of the houses of congress, and start to find out just what an anti-federalist is. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode.Founding Fathers debated over how to govern the new nation, beginning with the Articles of Confederation: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/articles-of-confederation When the Founding Fathers finally wrote the Constitution, they realized that they needed to add The Bill of Rights to get citizens on board with the new government: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-bill-of-rights Follow us: http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4096363 CrashCourse
Articles of Confederation & Free Inhabitants
 
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Let's take a look at the Articles of Confederation, Article IV. I admit I'm not this guy's superior, but I think I'll work in a pinch. Original Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H24sLF3CkMo Source on the Articles of Confederation: http://www.ushistory.org/documents/confederation.htm Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TylerValleGG Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TylerValleGG
Views: 87576 Tyler Valle
What is CONFEDERATION? CONFEDERATION meaning - CONFEDERATION definition
 
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What is CONFEDERATION? CONFEDERATION meaning - CONFEDERATION pronunciation - CONFEDERATION definition - CONFEDERATION explanation - How to pronounce CONFEDERATION? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license.
Views: 3466 The Audiopedia
Systems of Government: Confederation
 
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SS6CG4 The student will compare and contrast various forms of government. a. Describe the ways government systems distribute power: unitary, confederation, and federal.
Views: 6184 AmandaFoxFlipped
Articles of Confederation and Constitution Lesson - No Bull Review
 
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CLICK ABOVE FOR UPDATED VIDEO!!!! Learn all about the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution with this review video. Get other free AP Gov, APUSH Review and US History Review Materials at mrklaff.com. Free Flashcards, multiple choice, review sheets, review songs, and anything else you need to learn US History curriculum. Best of luck on your tests!
Views: 11290 mrklaffdotcom
The Articles of Confederation | BRI Homework Help
 
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Have you ever looked at your teacher with a puzzled face when they explain history? I know we have. In our new Homework Help Series we break down history into easy to understand 5 minute videos to support a better understanding of American History. In our eighth episode, we tackle the Articles of Confederation and the need for a Constitution.
Articles of Confederation
 
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Mr. Zoeller explains the first constitution of the United States, the Articles of Confederation.
Views: 962 Michael Zoeller
What is a federation?
 
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On 11th February 2014, a much-debated joint declaration signaled the beginning of renewed negotiations for the settlement of the Cyprus problem. Article 3 of the declaration provides that ‘the settlement will be based on a bi-communal, bi-zonal federation with political equality’. But what is a bi-zonal, bi-communal federation? Visit us at www.thecypriotpuzzle.org for more information. Animation created by: Zedem Media (www.zedemanimations.com) Recorded at: Bluenatic Studios Narration by: Alexia Paraskeva Co-Funded by the 'Youth Board of Cyprus' (http://www.youthboard.org.cy) A federation is a type of political entity, a specific way of allocating power. Three different types of political entities are: the unitary state, the federation & the confederation. Unitary State In a unitary state, power is concentrated in a single, central government. It has a single legal identity, both domestically and internationally. The central government is responsible for all domestic and foreign policy making. Federation In a federation, power is divided among two or more constituent states and a central, or ‘federal’ government. Powers not identified in the constitution, called ‘residual powers’, are exercised by the central government. While the constituent states can create their own domestic policies, only the central government can determine foreign policy. A federation has a single legal identity internationally. The constituent states do not have the right to unilaterally secede. That means they can’t decide to ‘break off’ from the federation. Confederation A confederation consists of unitary states and/or federations that give up certain powers, voluntarily, to a central government. Constituent states have distinct domestic and international legal identities. Residual powers fall under each constituent state’s authority. States have the right to unilaterally secede. Contrary to what we may think, there is no one recipe for a unitary state, federation or confederation. Instead, we can imagine political entities lying on a spectrum. To assess where a given political entity lies on this spectrum, we look at which elements of legislative and policy-making power is allocated where. The political entity envisaged in the joint declaration is a federation with two constituent states defined by geographic locations (zones) and ethnic groups (communities). According to the document, a united Cyprus will have a ‘single international legal personality’ and a ‘single united Cyprus citizenship’. It also states that ‘secession or any other unilateral change…will be prohibited’. While these are characteristics of a federation, the declaration also provides for ‘residual powers to be exercised by the constituent states’, something usually associated with the looser structure of a confederation.
Views: 13467 The Cypriot Puzzle
The Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, and "Limited Government"
 
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Are your progressive friends correct to say the US Constitution is not a limited government document after all? Bill Watkins joins me to discuss both the Constitution and the Articles of Confederation, and what the light of history can tell us about each. Subscribe to the Tom Woods Show: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-tom-woods-show/id716825890?mt=2 http://www.TomWoods.com/787 http://www.SupportingListeners.com http://www.RonPaulHomeschool.com http://www.FreeHistoryCourse.com
Views: 4270 TomWoodsTV
Articles of Confederation
 
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Explains that the Americans feared a strong government, so they gave states power under Article of Confederation. However, the weaknesses of a confederal system led us to write the US Constitution.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 236 Caitlin Long
What is FEDERALISM? What does FEDERALISM mean? FEDERALISM meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is FEDERALISM? What does FEDERALISM mean? FEDERALISM meaning - FEDERALISM definition - FEDERALISM explanation Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Federalism refers to the mixed or compound mode of government, combining a general government (the central or 'federal' government) with regional governments (provincial, state, Land, cantonal, territorial or other sub-unit governments) in a single political system. Its distinctive feature, exemplified in the founding example of modern federalism of the United States of America under the Constitution of 1787, is a relationship of parity between the two levels of government established. It can thus be defined as a form of government in which there is a division of powers between two levels of government of equal status. Federalism is distinguished from confederalism, in which the general level of government is subordinate to the regional level, and from devolution within a unitary state, in which the regional level of government is subordinate to the general level. It represents the central form in the pathway of regional integration or separation, bounded on the less integrated side by confederalism and on the more integrated side by devolution within a unitary state. Leading examples of the federation or federal state include Canada, the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Germany, Switzerland, Australia and India. Some also today characterize the European Union as the pioneering example of federalism in a multi-state setting, in a concept termed the federal union of states. The terms 'federalism' and 'confederalism' both have a root in the Latin word foedus, meaning "treaty, pact or covenant." Their common meaning until the late eighteenth century was a simple league or inter-governmental relationship among sovereign states based upon a treaty. They were therefore initially synonyms. It was in this sense that James Madison in Federalist 39 had referred to the new United States as 'neither a national nor a federal Constitution, but a composition of both' (i.e. neither a single large unitary state nor a league/confederation among several small states, but a hybrid of the two). In the course of the nineteenth century the meaning of federalism would come to shift, strengthening to refer uniquely to the novel compound political form, while the meaning of confederalism would remain at a league of states. Thus, this article relates to the modern usage of the word 'federalism'. Modern federalism is a system based upon democratic rules and institutions in which the power to govern is shared between national and provincial/state governments. The term federalist describes several political beliefs around the world depending on context. It is often perceived as an optimal solution for states comprising different cultural or ethnic communities. However, tensions between territories can be found in federalist countries such as Canada and federation as a way to appease and quell military conflict has failed recently in places like Libya or Iraq, while the formula is simultaneously proposed and dismissed in countries such as Ukraine or Syria. Federations such as Yugoslavia or Czechoslovakia collapsed as soon as it was possible to put the model to the test. In Europe, "Federalist" is sometimes used to describe those who favor a common federal government, with distributed power at regional, national and supranational levels. Most European federalists want this development to continue within the European Union. European federalism originated in post-war Europe; one of the more important initiatives was Winston Churchill's speech in Zürich in 1946. In the United States, federalism originally referred to belief in a stronger central government. When the U.S. Constitution was being drafted, the Federalist Party supported a stronger central government, while "Anti-Federalists" wanted a weaker central government. This is very different from the modern usage of "federalism" in Europe and the United States. The distinction stems from the fact that "federalism" is situated in the middle of the political spectrum between a confederacy and a unitary state. The U.S. Constitution was written as a reaction to the Articles of Confederation, under which the United States was a loose confederation with a weak central government.
Views: 21093 The Audiopedia
Article IV for Dummies: Full Faith and Credit Explained
 
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Article IV of the US Constitution explained including the Full Faith and Credit Clause, the Privileges and Immunities Clause and the admission of new states. The Constitution for Dummies series continues with an explanation of all four sections of Article IV of the Constitution, better known as the Full Faith and Credit Clause. Article IV: http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/articleiv Subscribe to my fellow EDU Gurus!! AMOR SCIENDI http://www.youtube.com/AmorSciendi ASAP SCIENCE http://www.youtube.com/AsapSCIENCE BOZEMAN BIOLOGY http://www.youtube.com/bozemanbiology KUMESHI CHAN http://www.youtube.com/KemushiChan BITE-SCIZED SCIENCE http://www.youtube.com/Lexie527 MATH APPITICIAN http://www.youtube.com/mathapptician MYLES POWER http://www.youtube.com/powerm1985 PROFS POP http://www.youtube.com/profspop SPANISH IS YOUR AMIGO http://www.youtube.com/SpanishIsYourA... Subscribe to these geniuses! Smarter Every Day http://www.youtube.com/user/destinws2 History for Music Lovers http://www.youtube.com/user/historyte... Crash Course w/ the Green Brothers http://www.youtube.com/crashcourse Steve Spangler Science: http://www.youtube.com/SteveSpanglerS... Minute Physics: http://www.youtube.com/minutephysics PBSIdeaChannel: https://www.youtube.com/pbsideachannel Numberphile: http://www.youtube.com/numberphile Deep Sky Videos: http://www.youtube.com/deepskyvideos Veritasium: http://www.youtube.com/1veritasium ViHart: http://www.youtube.com/vihart CGP Grey: http://www.youtube.com/cgpgrey VSauce: http://www.youtube.com/vsauce TedEd: http://www.youtube.com/TEDEducation Love history? Come "like" / follow HipHughes History on Facebook!
Views: 35994 Hip Hughes
What Were the Articles of Confederation? | History
 
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Before the U.S. Constitution was the law of the land, there were the Articles of Confederation. Find out why they didn't last long. Newsletter: https://www.history.com/newsletter Website - http://www.history.com Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+HISTORY/posts Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Twitter - https://twitter.com/history HISTORY Topical Video Season 1 Whether you're looking for more on American Revolution battles, WWII generals, architectural wonders, secrets of the ancient world, U.S. presidents, Civil War leaders, famous explorers or the stories behind your favorite holidays. HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Views: 64773 HISTORY
20. Confederation
 
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The American Revolution (HIST 116) This lecture discusses the ongoing political experimentation involved in creating new constitutions for the new American states. Having declared independence from Great Britain, Americans had to determine what kind of government best suited their individual states as well as the nation at large; to many, this was the "whole object" of their revolutionary turmoil. Different people had different ideas about what kind of republican government would work best for their state. Should there be a unicameral or a bicameral legislature? How should political representation be organized and effected? How far should the principle of popular sovereignty be taken? 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction: Confederation 03:13 - Chapter 2. An Atmosphere of Experimentation with Governance 07:47 - Chapter 3. Congressional Encouragement of New State Constitutions 13:38 - Chapter 4. Adams's Thoughts on Government: Support for Bicameral Legislature 20:12 - Chapter 5. Core Tenets and Ideas in the State Constitutions 32:30 - Chapter 6. The Development of the Articles of Confederation 41:31 - Chapter 7. Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2010.
Views: 24328 YaleCourses
The Articles of Confederation Explained: U.S. History Review
 
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A review of our first Constitution, the AOC. What were the Articles of Confederation? How did it run the United States? Why did the Articles of Confederation fail? Mr. Hughes explains the basics of the Articles of Confederation including the reasons for its eventual demise. Check out the US Playlist for hundreds of videos! Now go subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/user/hughesDV/featured
Views: 289747 Hip Hughes
The Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation; Constitution; Declaration; Gettysburg
 
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Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation by the Second Continental Congress; U.S. Constitution; The Declaration of Independence; Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - LISTEN to this entire book for free! Chapter Listing and Length: Articles of Confederation by The Second Continental Congress -- 00:21:28 US Constitution by The United States -- 00:49:17 Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson -- 00:09:28 Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln -- 00:02:13 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more info visit Librivox.org
Views: 2612 Greatest AudioBooks
The Articles of Confederation Explained in One Minute
 
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Betcha I can explain the Articles of Confederation in one minute. Check out the longer version here, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQtJNK5_8Uk
Views: 5991 Hip Hughes
What Do Confederation Mean?
 
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Synonyms for confederation at thesaurus with free online thesaurus, antonyms, and see definition of 10 words that will show your age the united states confederate soldiers came to canada. Confederation definition of confederation by the free dictionarycollins english dictionary. Confederation definition of confederation in english defined. This offer does not include any other colony but canada, unless nine states meaning, pronunciation, example sentences, and more from oxford you can change your cookie settings at time. Confederation' however, unlike a federation, the eu does not have exclusive powers over foreign affairs, defence and taxation. 00 0 votes)rate this definition confederation(noun). The act of improving enough to compete against teams in like the unites states and mexico can be difficult for smaller countries confederation, which often lack definition confederation alliance, association, or league there several reasons why an entrepreneur would want sell a business. The united states confederate soldiers came to canadajoining of communities become a provincejoining or section the articles confederation (1781 1789) and what it means. Sparknotes the articles of confederation (1781 1789) article 11. What does confederation mean? Canadian citizenship test free. Joining of suburbs to form a large citydefinition confederation. What is confederation? Definition and meaning businessdictionary confederation in the cambridge english dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation 30 jul 2017 learn the definition of term 'canadian confederation' and its significance within historical framework this north american country ''8listopad 2015. Au dictionary definition confederationcanadian citizenship practice test richmond public library. Furthermore, laws wiktionary(0. A union or alliance of states political organizations. What was canadian confederation? Thoughtcoconfederation definition for kids youtubethesaurus. Often confederation meaning, definition, what is an organization consisting of different groups people working together for business or synonyms, pronunciation, translation, english dictionary definition confederationand engaged that it should be perpetual, by the articles in 1778 20 aug 2017 a group smaller states. Confederation dictionary definition vocabulary the noun confederation comes from early 15th century, meaning an instead, final two qualification matches in determine who will definition, act of confederatingexplore curse words we should bring back saddest english a is union sovereign states, united for purposes common action often canada, word has additional, unrelated. The act of forming an alliance or confederation; A union political organizations; state being allied confederated the legal definition confederation is a loose association states in which central, subordinate and limited government structure created for some what does mean? . A confederation of trade unions' definition the a is an alliance or group people nations with
Views: 48 A Big Question II
What Is The Concept Of Confederation?
 
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The articles of confederation cliffs notes. Confederation wikipedia a confederation is union of sovereign states, united for purposes common action often in canada, the word has an additional, unrelated meaning. Confederation' refers to the process of (or event of) establishing or noun confederation comes from early 15th century, meaning an agreement. Confederation wikipediawhat is confederation? Definition and meaning businessdictionary confederation. Concepts of federalism cliffs notes. Confederation legal definition of confederation dictionary. Definition of confederation by merriam webster. See more articles of confederation definition, the first constitution 13 american states, adopted in 1781 and replaced 1789 by united states. Link cite add to word listthe definition of a confederation is an alliance or primarily any league union people bodies. Dictionary and see definition of confederation. Sparknotes the articles of confederation (1781 1789) contextthesaurus anarchist library. Show confederations for generations tried to countervail a then the concept of confederation loses all meaning. Confederation is similar to the word 'federation,' but with important definition of confederation alliance, association, or league in which independent entities retain their distinction and sovereignty delegate some powers define a group people, countries, organizations, etc. Confederation definition of confederation by the free dictionarydefine at dictionary define articles britannica. A union of states in which each member state retains some independent control over internal and external affairsthe act forming into or becoming part a confederacythe being confederateda group confederates, especially nations, united confederation definition, the confederating. Confederation definition, examples, processes legaldictionary. Use confederation in a sentence. Meaning, pronunciation the articles of confederation were adopted by second continental congress on november 15, 1777, but did not become effective until march 1, 1781, when it contrasts with a unitary government, in which central authority holds power, and confederation, states, for example, are clearly dominant as first official document that defined united states both reflected ideals philosophies american synonyms at thesaurus free online thesaurus, antonyms, definitions. The term in modern political use is generally confined to a permanent union of the articles confederation established confederacy type government among terma or alliance states organizations 20 aug 2017 definition an organization group consisting smaller groups. In a world profoundly shaken in the past years by radical and meaning of confederation is an organisation some sovereign states which join together for common defence other purposes defined explained with examples. Second, the modern institution of confederation is obvious relevance today. The articles of confederation boundlesscollins english dictionary. A confederation i
Views: 22 A Big Question II
Articles of Confederation Lesson
 
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An introduction to the Articles of Confederation. Use this link for the post activity https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uca6vBnanyHK6lVryI6gp4D-TwvL_8FMbUtH4shbYtQ/edit
Views: 4659 Mike Clancy
Congress for Dummies -- Article 1 of the Constitution
 
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The second in the Constitution for Dummies series, in this lecture HipHughes takes you through Article I of the Constitution examining all ten sections outlining Legislative Powers. The Constitution Explained Series. 48 Videos, 6.5 Hours Long. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLi3U-nPPrbS5d-juhFwo3hTBso0gq2sUZ
Views: 172451 Hip Hughes
Lessons Learned: The Articles of Confederation
 
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On March 1, 1781, the Articles of Confederation came into effect after Maryland became the thirteenth and final state to ratify them. As the first constitution for the new nation, The Articles established a national legislature but assigned it relatively little power. The individual colonies retained much of their sovereignty, and it soon became clear that such a weak federal government was ineffective. By 1787 the framers had begun writing a new constitution, the one that created the federal government Americans have today. James M. Lindsay, CFR's senior vice president and director of studies, says that this episode in U.S. history points to the difficulty of creating a workable constitution. "It is easy to write a constitution," he says, but "hard to write a constitution that works." This lesson, he argues, should be kept in mind as countries like Egypt, Tunisia, Myanmar, and South Sudan "struggle to create effective and legitimate systems of government." This video is part of Lessons Learned, a series dedicated to exploring historical events and examining their meaning in the context of foreign relations today: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF2F38E5941910270 http://www.cfr.org/us-strategy-and-politics/lessons-learned-articles-confederation/p27505
The Articles of Confederation
 
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PowerPoint available at: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Mr-Raymond-Civics-Eoc-Academy This video explores the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, the reasons it was deliberately weak, the powers under the confederation that were granted as well as the powers that were missing. The weaknesses are discussed with the effects they had on the ability to wage war against the British and solve the problems of the new country. While this video was designed for students taking the Florida End-of-Course exam, it will help any Civics or U.S. Government students. Mr. Raymond’s Civics E.O.C. Academy was designed for students taking the Florida Civics End-of-Course (EOC) Exam. However, as many states are implementing Civics Exams, these videos will work for all students of Civics, US Government, and US History. Currently students have to pass a civics state exam in order to graduate in Idaho, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Arizona, North Dakota, Louisiana, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah. These videos look at all of the civics benchmarks that will be tested on most state civics exams. As a civics teacher I have often looked for civics YouTube video clips to show my students. I hope these videos will serve as a supplement to lessons for civics teachers, US history teachers, US government teachers and their students. While they might be a little basic for AP Government students, they could serve as a refresher of basic concepts and content. I have also thought that these videos could help those who are going to take the naturalization test to become US Citizens. I have also been reached by parents whose children are taking Florida Virtual School’s (FLVS) Civics class. ***For noncommercial, educational, and archival purposes under Law of Fair Use as provided in section 107 of the US copyright law. No copyrights infringements intended***
Articles in English Grammar I Use, Rules & Examples of Articles A An The in Hindi
 
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The - कब द, कब दी कहेंगे A/An - कब A, कब An....Let's learn Articles in English Grammar I Use, Rules & Examples of Articles A An The in Hindi Dear Subscriber, सभी लिंक नीचे दिये गये हैं (All the links are given below) – Spoken English Guru Book - https://www.flipkart.com/englishwale-com-english-speaking-course-book/p/itme4r2fkhsr7yph?pid=9788193074305 Spoken English Guru All Videos Pen Drive {16 GB (Lesson 1 to 20 - 240+ videos)} - http://englishwale.com/product/spoken-english-pendrive/ Free Spoken English Guru PDF eBook - http://englishwale.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Spoken-English-Guru-eBook-1.pdf All Charts http://englishwale.com/english-charts/ Complete English Speaking Course (Lesson 1 to 20) (240+ videos): Lesson 1: Basics of English Grammar & Spoken https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox569k1T00UH7zdw0ZETatLz Lesson 2: Simple Sentences https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4xqm9T72J1D6I2IqLG4cJr Lesson 3: Tenses https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4evkxrt2AnfXpndrYtEo5Q Lesson 4: Modal Helping Verbs https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6FoHE30D7mAk5DylqVR81O Lesson 5: Prepositions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5sd3o3RZE9HJcZ_crRvBYG Lesson 6: All Conjunctions in English Grammar https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5cy2xkIQknyfyd9PSxR3JY Lesson 7: Daily Use English Sentences & Words | Daily English Speaking Practice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5WZDOosR7ihWooeFwnT8Hf Lesson 8: English Pronunciation & Sound Videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4CdWX12bGL396YGeIEhqiS Lesson 9: "Do You Know Module" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5jCZrLMal3-d4Al5yHwYD7 Lesson 10: Active & Passive Voice https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7M4w-k72XtRwP5OlZEXT_j Lesson 11: Practice Exercises & Test Papers https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox6AvA4NUZyNCpfMXIXwDSNq Lesson 12: Have Having & other Advance English Topics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox53AvjielYUoRlaO_cuBDQb Lesson 13: Be Being Been | Concept and Use https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5o2yrhbITHJ1T2RbuImFDn Lesson 14: English Conversations (अंग्रेजी में वार्तालाप) https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5BU_Hkqwp7v7UdW9X5_-rh Lesson 15: English Grammar Doubt Clearing Sessions https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7gZn51MoIEMOvLd36mzdKl&disable_polymer=true Lesson 16: English Listening Practice for Pronunciation Improvement https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5b-qNJZTsRYqUqGmOsb9N1&disable_polymer=true Lesson 17: Hindi to English Translation Exercises https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4myjPpnomQnvU37GUbXE2s Lesson 18: Important English Structures with Examples https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox4OlsHJ8ZE3VBy2zZodXx0i Lesson 19: English Speaking Practice through Hindi https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox5RSgM5wsAbCbTMXi9AAJFh Lesson 20: English Speaking with Kids https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsXdBvuJ5ox7JDlK6GUD3KkyqzbdGZSXm
Views: 741696 Spoken English Guru
Shays' Rebellion Explained
 
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A quick overview of the 1786-1787 event known as Shay's Rebellion. Perfect for students of the Social Studies, lifelong learners and the Cray Cray on the internets. Subscribe to HipHughes History, it's stupid easy and free https://www.youtube.com/user/hughesdv?sub_confirmation=1&src_vid=hDjLSfWvNlQ&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_3651517591
Views: 164835 Hip Hughes
Constitution  Articles 1 to 11 Telugu
 
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Long Note Four by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100467 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 393592 Digital Reading
Video Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation Thesis Development
 
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This is a video of my students completing a graphic organizer to develop a thesis on the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation
The Articles of Confederation: Why Did It Fail?
 
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This video was made exclusively for classroom use in alignment with the Virginia Department of Education standard for US History 1. In this lesson, you will learn about five weaknesses of America's national government: The Articles of Confederation. #jmlpride
Views: 3408 JML 6th Grade History
Lesson 11: Articles of Confederation
 
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Articles of Confederation, Land Ordinance of 1785, Northwest Ordinance of 1787
Views: 2071 MrSteinersClass
The American Revolution - OverSimplified (Part 2)
 
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First 200 people get 20% off Brilliant! - https://brilliant.org/OverSimplified/ MERCH: https://oversimplified.tv/merch Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/OverSimple Want to know how I make these videos? I use Adobe After Effects. Get it here - https://bit.ly/2OhsfY6 Twitter: https://twitter.com/over_simplified Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OverSimplified/ Instagram: https://www.instragram.com/over_simplified https://www.oversimplified.tv --ATTRIBUTIONS-- Images licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/): - Paisley Pattern - bote jeghe (https://www.brusheezy.com/patterns/38871-paisley-pattern-bote-jeghe-num-2) - Complete Tree Brush Pack (https://www.brusheezy.com/brushes/1312-complete-tree-brush-pack) - Distressed Ink Texture (https://www.brusheezy.com/textures/54009-distressed-ink-texture-overlays) - Vintage Repeat pattern (https://www.brusheezy.com/patterns/1995-vintage-repeat-pattern) - Vector Flower Brushes (https://www.brusheezy.com/brushes/12737-vector-flower-brushes) -Spanish Flag by durero (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bandera_de_Espa%C3%B1a_1760-1785.svg) - Fleur de Lis by Sodacan (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleur-de-lis#/media/File:Fleur_de_lys_(or).svg) -Versailles by Myrabella (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chateau_Versailles_Galerie_des_Glaces.jpg) - Queen Elizabeth II by Presidencia de la República Mexicana (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:HM_Queen_Elizabeth_II.jpg) - Ryde Ladies Bowling Team by zorilla (https://www.flickr.com/photos/barry_b/231753697) - Bald Eagle over Homer by Andy Morffew (https://www.flickr.com/photos/andymorffew/25225263373) - Science Symbol by AllyUnion/Stannered (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Science-symbol-2.svg) - Fried Chicken by EvanAmos (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fried-Chicken-Leg.jpg) World Map NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Image by Reto Stöckli (land surface, shallow water, clouds). Enhancements by Robert Simmon (ocean color, compositing, 3D globes, animation). Data and technical support: MODIS Land Group; MODIS Science Data Support Team; MODIS Atmosphere Group; MODIS Ocean Group Additional data: USGS EROS Data Center (topography); USGS Terrestrial Remote Sensing Flagstaff Field Center (Antarctica); Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (city lights). All music by Kevin Macleod (incompetech.com) licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/): The Descent Who Likes To Party Hard Boiled Crossing the Chasm Expeditionary Americana Covert Affair Investigations Digya Expeditionary I Knew A Guy Kool Kats Infados Bumbly March Marty Gots A Plan Fife And Drum Achaidh Cheide Loopster Ave Marimba Faceoff The following tracks by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com: Dark Mystery Chasin' It The Buccaneer's Haul by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com Additional music acquired royalty free via ArtList All sound effects licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/): - Airy Whoosh by sonictechtonic (https://freesound.org/people/sonictechtonic/sounds/243567/) - Synthesized Explosion 08 by RSilveira_88 (https://freesound.org/people/RSilveira_88/sounds/216271/) - footsteps muddy by inspectorj (https://freesound.org/people/InspectorJ/sounds/329603/) - Big Splash by DarcyDunes (https://freesound.org/people/darcydunes/sounds/273834/) - Horse Galloping by alanmcki (https://freesound.org/people/alanmcki/sounds/403026/) - Pencil Writing Close by InspectorJ (https://freesound.org/people/InspectorJ/sounds/398271/) - Medium Wind by kangaroovindaloo (https://freesound.org/people/kangaroovindaloo/sounds/205966/) - Giggle by Silversatyr (https://freesound.org/people/silversatyr/sounds/333275/) - Walk Mud by jankoehl (https://freesound.org/people/JanKoehl/sounds/85604/) - 0384 Flags by bmoreno (https://freesound.org/people/bmoreno/sounds/164191/) - Cash Register by kiddpark (https://freesound.org/people/kiddpark/sounds/201159/)
Views: 4039829 OverSimplified
Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
 
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Article I of the US Constitution describes the roles and powers of Congress. In this video, Kim discusses Article I with scholars Heather Gerken and Ilya Somin. To learn more about US Government and Politics, visit Khan Academy at https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-us-government-and-politics To read more of Article I, visit the National Constitution Center’s Interactive Constitution: https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/articles/article-i On this site, leading scholars interact and explore the Constitution and its history. For each provision of the Constitution, experts from different political perspectives coauthor interpretive explanations when they agree and write separately when their opinions diverge.
Views: 11955 Khan Academy
The Articles of Confederation in One Minute
 
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How it Happened: US History In just one minute (and 20 seconds) this video covers the major info points of the Articles of Confederation, which were a sort of prequel or beta test for the Constitution. Learn what they were, why they were need, and why they ultimately failed. Spoiler: it's all about money. Be sure to subscribe and suggest future topics in the comments.
Views: 83128 How it Happens
the articles of confederation strengths and weaknesses essays
 
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Inquiry: https://goo.gl/KEKyzb?34149
Weaknessess of the Articles of Confederation (feat. whiteboyrappers_97)
 
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this is an educational video lyricz: The Articles of Confederation were the first set of rules They set up the 13 states to be lookin' like fools Every state was sovereign defining what was right Until the founding fathers the Constitution they did write They couldn't draft troops so an army they were lackin' Now with the Constitution We'll send our enemies packin' Previously in Congress each state just had one vote Now with the Constitution of population the House takes note They couldn't levy taxes with the Articles of Confederation Now with the Constitution Our money pays for this nation Before the Constitution we knew no right from wrong We had to definition til the federal courts came along Now the Articles of Confederation weren't very swag With the Constitution we've got this in the bag
Views: 64 Grace Meroff
The Articles of Confederation, and Shay's Rebellion (LEGO version)
 
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The Articles of Confederation, and Shay's Rebellion LEGO Style!
Views: 6692 TheTroth11
Celebrating the Constitution
 
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A brief introduction to the creation and meaning of the Constitution for students in grades 4 through 8. The Articles of Confederation and the Constitutional Congress are discuss, as are the three branches of government and the Bill of Rights.
Views: 259 KATE TICK
The Articles of Confederation Audiobook | Full Audiobook Ebook Librivox | President Trump USA
 
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More books at http://librivox.org and http://youtube.com/audiobooksfreeBringing you Librivox audiobooks for free on YouTube. Full text of the Articles of Confederation Audiobook. This free Articles of Confederation Audiobook produced by http://www.librivox.org, and all Librivox audiobook recordings are free, in the public domain. Feel free to download this Articles of Confederation Audiobook free audiobook here at the Constitution of the United States Audiobook audio Librivox page: http://librivox.org/us-historical-documents/ "articles of confederation" "the articles of confederation" "articles of confederation history" "article of confederation" "shays rebellion" "articles of confederation video" "articles of confederation constitution" "articles of the confederation" "the constitution" "articles of confederation song" "constitution" "articles of the constitution" "the article of confederation" "confederation" "articles of confederation videos" "articles of confederation youtube" "the article of confederation" "confederation" "articles of confederation videos" "articles of confederation youtube" "articles of confederation vs constitution" "shays rebellion history channel" "articles of confederation history channel" "before the constitution" "the article of confederation" "confederation" "articles of confederation videos" "articles of confederation youtube" "the articles of confederation: before the consti" "school house rock articles of confederation" "articles of confederation cartoon" "youtube articles of confederation" "the articles of confederation before the constit" "articals of confederation" "video articles of confederation" "the confederation and the constitution" "john adams articles of confederation" "articles of confederations" "articles of confederation before the constitutio" "the articles of the confederation" "articles confederation" "history of the constitution" "articles of conferderation" "articles of confederation vs. constitution" "articles of confederation school house rock" "articles of confederation schoolhouse rock" "articles of confederation and constitution" "video on the articles of confederation" "articles of constitution" "schoolhouse rock articles of confederation" "you tube articles of confederation" "confederate constitution" "weaknesses of the articles of confederation" "articles of confederation 1778" "problems with the articles of confederation" "failure of the articles of confederation" "youtube articles of confederation" "articles of confederation problems" "problems of the articles of confederation" "youtube" "articles of confederation in kid language" "the articles of confederation national congress" "articles of confederation youtube" "the problems of the articles of confederation" "congress 1786" "youtube articles" "problems with the confederation" "differences between the articles of confederatio" "you tube articles ofconfederation" "youtube/articles of confederation" "differences between virginia and massachusetts" "first three articles of the constitution" "college articles of confederation youtube" "annapolis meeting 1786" "shays rebellion 1787" "problems under the articles of confederation" "significance of shays rebellion" "article of confederation failures" "problems in the articles of confederation" "you tube speech on the articles of confederation" "talks on the articles of confederation" "all you need to know about the articles of confe" "everything you need to know about the articles o" "articles of confederation executive" "atricles of confederation" "compare articles of confederation to consitution" "articles of confederation video in ten minutes" "what did the articles of confederation changed" "articles of confederation movie" "hostage takeover of a courthouse" "articles of confederation meeting" "problems with article of confederation" "names of people that made it to government from" "judicial branch weak" "why did the articles of confederation fail" "articles of confederation in ten minutes" "why the articles of confederation failed" "articles of confederation in 10 minutes" "articles of confederation lecture" "why did articles of confederation fail" "why articles of confederation failed" "articles of confederation fail" "the articles of confederation in ten minutes" "us history regents" "the articles of confederation in 10 minutes" "how did the articles of confederation fail" "articles of confederation weaknesses" "american history regents" "the articles" "how did the articles of confederation changed fr" president trump
Views: 12844 audiobooksfree
Systems of Government:  Unitary, Federal, and Confederal
 
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This video is about VL Systems of Government
What is BGP CONFEDERATION? What does BGP CONFEDERATION mean? BGP CONFEDERATION meaning
 
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What is BGP CONFEDERATION? What does BGP CONFEDERATION mean? BGP CONFEDERATION meaning - BGP CONFEDERATION definition - BGP CONFEDERATION explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In network routing, BGP confederation is a method to use Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) to subdivide a single autonomous system (AS) into multiple internal sub-AS's, yet still advertise as a single AS to external peers. The intent is to reduce iBGP mesh size. The confederated AS is composed of multiple ASs. Each confederated AS alone has iBGP fully meshed and has connections to other ASs inside the confederation. Even though these ASs have eBGP peers to ASs within the confederation, the ASs exchange routing as if they used iBGP. In this way, the confederation preserves next hop, metric, and local preference information. To the outside world, the confederation appears to be a single AS. With this solution, iBGP transit AS problems can be resolved as iBGP requires a full mesh between all BGP routers: large number of TCP sessions and unnecessary duplication of routing traffic.
Views: 22 The Audiopedia
The Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation; Constitution; Declaration; Gettysburg
 
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Best United States Documents - Articles of Confederation by the Second Continental Congress; U.S. Constitution; The Declaration of Independence; Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address The Articles of Confederation: On November 15th, 1777 The Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The U.S. Constitution: The United States Constitution is the legal backbone of the United States of America and comprises the basic laws of the United States Federal Government. Delegates from twelve of the thirteen original colonies put the Constitution's frame work together in May 1787 in Philadelphia. The Constitution defines the three branches of government and their jurisdictions; they are the Executive Branch (President/Vice President), Legislative Branch (Congress comprised of the Senate & House of Representatives), and the Judicial Branch (the Supreme Court). The need for three branches of government was to create a separation of powers so that not one person or group has full responsibilities, but that they're spread out and each branch must refer to the other by a means of checks and balances. The Declaration of Independence: The Declaration of Independence is a document that is the epitome of freedom and liberty. It was drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1776 as a list of grievances against the King of England, George III. The Declaration expresses the conviction of Americans in a philosophy of self-evident truths of what individual liberty and freedom should be. The Declaration was the beginning to separation from England and the catalyst for a birth of a nation. The Gettysburg Address: The Gettysburg Address is considered one of the greatest and most quoted speeches of a President throughout American history. President Abraham Lincoln gave his address on the battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19th, 1863. It was a few months after the battle at Gettysburg was over, the purpose of Lincoln being there was to consecrate a cemetery to the fallen Union soldiers of the Civil War. It is believed that Lincoln's main goal of this opportunity was to fight for the United States as a united country and to express the equality of all under the law. (Summaries by Aldark) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - LISTEN to this entire book for free! Chapter Listing and Length: Articles of Confederation by The Second Continental Congress -- 00:21:28 US Constitution by The United States -- 00:49:17 Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson -- 00:09:28 Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln -- 00:02:13 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more info visit Librivox.org
Views: 11 David Hunt
Sovereign Citizens Getting Owned - Compilation
 
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The sovereign citizen movement is a loose grouping of American and Canadian litigants, commentators, tax protesters and financial-scheme promoters. Self-described sovereign citizens take the position that they are answerable only to their particular interpretation of the common law and are not subject to any statutes or proceedings at the federal, state, or municipal levels;[1] that they do not recognize United States currency; and/or that they are "free of any legal constraints."[2][3][4] They especially reject most forms of taxation as illegitimate.[5] Participants in the movement argue this concept in opposition to "federal citizens," who, they say, have unknowingly forfeited their rights by accepting some aspect of federal law.[6] It is similar in doctrines to the freemen on the land movement, more commonly found in Britain and Canada.[7][8][9][10] Many members of the sovereign citizen movement believe that the United States government is illegitimate.[11] JJ MacNab, who writes for Forbes about anti-government extremism, describes the sovereign citizens getting owned movement as consisting of individuals who believe that the County Sheriff is the most powerful law-enforcement officer in the country, with authority superior to that of any federal agent, elected official or local law-enforcement official.[12] This belief comes from the movement's origins in the "white extremist group" Posse Comitatus.[13] The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) classifies some sovereign citizens ("sovereign citizen extremists") as domestic terrorists.[14] In 2010, the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) estimated that approximately 100,000 Americans were "hard-core sovereign believers," with another 200,000 "just starting out by testing sovereign techniques for resisting everything from speeding tickets to drug charges."[15] According to a 2014 report by the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), a survey of law-enforcement officials and agencies across the United States concluded that the movement was the single greatest threat to their communities, ranking above Islamic terrorists and jihadists.[16][17][18] Sovereign citizens have also been identified as a potential terrorist threat by the New South Wales Police Force in Australia. Writing in American Scientific Affiliation, Dennis L. Feucht reviews American Militias: Rebellion, Racism & Religion by Richard Abanes, and describes the theory of a sovereign-citizen leader Richard McDonald, which is that there are two classes of citizens in America: the "original citizens of the states" (or "States citizens") and "U.S. citizens". McDonald asserts that U.S. citizens or "Fourteenth Amendment citizens" have civil rights, Legislated to give the freed black slaves after the Civil War rights comparable to the unalienable constitutional rights of white state citizens. The benefits of U.S. citizenship are received by consent in exchange for freedom. State citizens consequently take steps to revoke and rescind their U.S. citizenship and reassert their de jure common-law state citizen status. This involves removing one's self from federal jurisdiction and relinquishing any evidence of consent to U.S. citizenship, such as a Social Security number, driver's license, car registration, use of ZIP codes, marriage license, voter registration, and birth certificate. Also included is refusal to pay state and federal income taxes because citizens not under U.S. jurisdiction are not required to pay them. Only residents (resident aliens) of the states, not its citizens, are income-taxable, state citizens argue. And as a state citizen land owner, one can bring forward the original land patent and file it with the county for absolute or allodial property rights. Such allodial ownership is held "without recognizing any superior to whom any duty is due on account thereof" (Black's Law Dictionary). Superiors include those who levy property taxes or who hold mortgages or liens against the property.[20] In support of his theories, McDonald has established State Citizen Service Centers around the United States as well as a related web presence.[21] Writer Richard Abanes asserts that sovereign citizens fail to sufficiently examine the context of the case laws they cite, and ignore adverse evidence, such as Federalist No. 15, where Alexander Hamilton expressed the view that the Constitution placed everyone personally under federal authority.[20] Some "sovereign citizens" also claim that they can become immune to most or all laws of the USA by renouncing their citizenship, a process they refer to as "expatriation", which involves filing or delivering a bogus legal document to whichever county clerk's office they can get to accept it.
Views: 4123786 Kek Wills It
Federalism: Crash Course Government and Politics #4
 
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In which Craig Benzine teaches you about federalism, or the idea that in the United States, power is divided between the national government and the 50 state governments. Craig will teach you about how federalism has evolved over the history of the US, and what powers are given to the federal government, and what stuff the states control on their own. And he punches an eagle, which may not surprise you at all. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Instagram - http://instagram.com/thecrashcourse
Views: 1420551 CrashCourse
Free English Book on Tape: Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union by Continental Congress
 
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Download more free audio books in the English language, with the help of Audiobook Downloader Pro: http://www.superutils.com/products/audiobook-downloader-pro/ Try the Angel's Vox audiobook player: http://www.superutils.com/products/angels-vox/ If you need a batch tempo/pitch/playback rate converter for speed listening free audiobooks on a portable player: http://www.superutils.com/products/audio-speed-changer-pro/ Bundle offers including all three SuperUtils audio book softwares are available here: http://www.superutils.com/bundles/ 18% faster version of the free audiobook on YouTube 'Articles of Confederation' by the Second Continental Congress: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0c1KfPoFf4 This public domain audio book is read and recorded by Michael Scherer. Summary: On November 15th, 1777 the Articles of Confederation became the first constitution of the United States, though not yet ratified by the thirteen original colonies. Ratification of the Articles took place almost three and a half years later on March 1st, 1781. The purpose of the articles was to create a confederation of sovereign states with a weak central government; thus allowing state governments to wield most of the power. It wasn't long before the need for a stronger federal government was realized which led to the Articles being replaced by the United States Constitution. The Articles of Confederation is the common term for The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union. The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union by the Second Continental Congress at LibriVox: http://librivox.org/us-historical-documents/ This audiobook at Internet Archive: http://www.archive.org/details/united_states_documents The article at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articles_of_Confederation The electronic text of the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union: http://www.law.ou.edu/ushistory/artconf.shtml
Views: 2051 SuperUtils Software
The Constitution by Shmoop
 
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This video explains the U.S. Constitution of 1787 and the later Bill of Rights. Why did we need to create these documents? What do they do? Where do checks and balances come in?
Views: 66247 Shmoop
US Economic History 2 — Interstate Commerce & the Constitution
 
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The Constitution’s Interstate Commerce clause was supposed to liberate American markets. Video created with the Bill of Rights Institute to help students ace their exams. This is the second video in a series of nine with Professor Brian Domitrovic, which aim to be a resource for students studying for US History exams, and to provide a survey of different (and sometimes opposing) viewpoints on key episodes in U.S. economic history. How do you think we did? SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Know Your (Bill of) Rights (blog post): This blog post explains what rights each amendment of the Bill of Rights protects, as well as common threats to those rights today. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/know-your-bill-of-rights/ The Original Purpose of the US Constitution - Learn Liberty (video): Professor Randy Barnett explains that the constitution was written to protect the rights of the people. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiMOtS_lzZc Constitutional crisis or the Constitution at work? (blog post): Professor Lauren Hall explains how the constitution is being used to constrain President Trump’s powers today. http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/constitutional-crisis-or-the-constitution-at-work/ TRANSCRIPT: Brian Domitrovich: When the United States separated from Britain during the Revolutionary War, the first national government was established under the Articles of Confederation. The Articles created a minimal national government that had little ability to bend the will of the states towards the national interest. This limitation of federal authority became apparent when several states in the new nation became involved in trade disputes. In the years prior to the passage of the Constitution, in 1789, states routinely passed tariffs on each other. If a merchant in one state brought a good across a state border, the merchandise was subject to attacks, collectible by a customs agent. Tariffs caused ill will among the states as trade wars developed. Meanwhile, the national Congress was unable to get all the states to agree to a standard tariff on imported goods to raise tax revenue, and government was deeply in debt from the Revolutionary War and needed the revenue. The national government, under the Articles, could not do anything about these problems. Leaders became concerned that the tension could undo the union. Just before the Constitutional convention met in 1787, James Madison wrote a pamphlet called the Vices of the Political System. In that essay, he wrote that, "The practices of many states in restricting commercial intercourse with other states, and putting their productions and manufacturers on the same footing as with foreign nations. They're not contrary to the federal Articles. It's certainly a verse to the spirit of the union, and tends to beget retaliating regulations.… They are destructive of the general harmony.” This was one of the reasons some founders supported a new federal government that would replace the Articles of Confederation. And so it came to pass that the Constitution was ratified in 1789. Now one of the most significant new powers of the federal government under the Constitution was the power of Congress to regulate trade as outlined in Article I section 8 of the Constitution. The document specified that Congress had the power to "regulate commerce with foreign nations and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes." Furthermore, Congress, but not the states was also authorized to levy "taxes, duties, imposts, and excises." Upon ratification of the Constitution, states could no longer regulate trades among themselves, only Congress now had that authority, but even here the power was limited in that federal taxes had to be uniformed across all the states. Congress retained sole authority to regulate trade with other nations. Nonetheless, in future eras, including today, the commerce clause is used to justify almost any Congressional regulation of the economy, and many Congressional laws. This appears to be at variance with the narrow and define purpose of the commerce clause. Article I Section 8 at the time it was written. Its purpose was to end state tariffs and duties, to prevent in concert with other articles in the Constitution, Congress from discriminating against trade from any particular state, and to give Congress the sole power of imposing taxes on foreign goods. The development of a vast administrative and regulatory state in the 20th and now the 21st Century, came because Congress and the courts felt that the commerce clause of Article I Section 8 of the Constitution, could be interpreted much more broadly, than it initially was in the 1780s and 1790s. LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
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