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Conceptual Analysis
 
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A brief introduction to a common practice in contemporary philosophy
Views: 8200 Andrew Cullison
How to Argue - Philosophical Reasoning: Crash Course Philosophy #2
 
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Before we dive into the big questions of philosophy, you need to know how to argue properly. We’ll start with an overview of philosophical reasoning and breakdown of how deductive arguments work (and sometimes don’t work). -- Images and video via VideoBlocks or Wikimedia Commons, licensed under Creative Commons by 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 2079797 CrashCourse
Conceptual analysis Meaning
 
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Video is created with the help of wikipedia, if you are looking for accurate, professional translation services and efficient localization you can use Universal Translation Services https://www.universal-translation-services.com?ap_id=ViragGNG Video shows what conceptual analysis means. The analysis of concepts, including, for a given concept, the search for its definition.. Conceptual analysis Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say conceptual analysis. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 864 ADictionary
Theory Conceptual Analysis
 
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By Abbie, Meredith, Lane, Tina, M'Lea
Views: 415 abbie Timms
Philosophical analysis
 
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Philosophical analysis Philosophical analysis (from Greek: Φιλοσοφική ανάλυση) is a general term for techniques typically used by philosophers in the analytic tradition that involve "breaking down" (i.e.analyzing) philosophical issues. -Video is targeted to blind users Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA image source in video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXThKv0oltw
Views: 533 WikiAudio
The Meaning of Knowledge: Crash Course Philosophy #7
 
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On today’s episode...CATS. Also: Hank talks about some philosophy stuff, like a few of the key concepts philosophers use when discussing belief and knowledge, such as what defines an assertion and a proposition, and that belief is a kind of propositional attitude. Hank also discusses forms of justification and the traditional definition of knowledge, which Edmund Gettier just totally messed with, using his Gettier cases. Many thanks to Index the cat for his patience in the filming of this episode. -- PBS Digital Studios wants to get to know you better! If you have 10 minutes, we'd really appreciate it AND you'll be entered for a chance to win a t-shirt! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/pbsds2016 -- Images and video via VideoBlocks or Wikimedia Commons, licensed under Creative Commons by 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ “Ancient Aliens” copyright 2010 The History Channel Classroom image via Public Domain Images http://www.public-domain-image.com/ -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1172770 CrashCourse
Concepts Versus Intuitions
 
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A clip of Ray Monk discussing the relationship between concepts and intuitions/perceptions. This clip is from a talk he gave on the philosophical landscape of 1905.
Views: 3255 Philosophy Overdose
The Philosophy of Logical Analysis
 
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Chapter Thirty-one from Book Three, Part Two of Bertrand Russell's "The History Of Western Philosophy" (1945).
Views: 10168 workingklass0
how to write a conceptual analysis essay
 
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Visit: https://goo.gl/zrkhTW?22430
October Sky Conceptual Analysis
 
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Summary plus physics concepts in the movie.
Views: 54 Shayne Abao
What is CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK? What does CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK mean?
 
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What is CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK? What does CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK mean? CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK meaning - CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK definition - CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A conceptual framework is an analytical tool with several variations and contexts. It is used to make conceptual distinctions and organize ideas. Strong conceptual frameworks capture something real and do this in a way that is easy to remember and apply. Isaiah Berlin used the metaphor of a "fox" and a "hedgehog" to make conceptual distinctions in how important philosophers and authors view the world. Berlin describes hedgehogs as those who use a single idea or organizing principle to view the world (such as Dante Alighieri, Blaise Pascal, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Plato, Henrik Ibsen and Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel). Foxes, on the other hand, incorporate a type of pluralism and view the world through multiple, sometimes conflicting, lenses (examples include Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, James Joyce, William Shakespeare, Aristotle, Herodotus, Moliere,, Honoré de Balzac). Economists use the conceptual framework of "supply" and "demand" to distinguish between the behavior and incentive systems of firms and consumers. Like many conceptual frameworks, supply and demand can be presented through visual or graphical representations. The use of the term conceptual framework crosses both scale (large and small theories) and contexts (social science, marketing, applied science, art etc.). Its explicit definition and application can therefore vary. Conceptual frameworks are particularly useful as organizing devices in empirical research. One set of scholars has applied the notion of conceptual framework to deductive, empirical research at the micro- or individual study level. They employ American football plays as a useful metaphor to clarify the meaning of conceptual framework (used in the context of a deductive empirical study). Likewise, conceptual frameworks are abstract representations, connected to the research project's goal that direct the collection and analysis of data (on the plane of observation – the ground). Critically, a football play is a "plan of action" tied to a particular, timely, purpose, usually summarized as long or short yardage. Shields and Rangarajan argue that it is this tie to "purpose" that make American football plays such a good metaphor. They define a conceptual framework as "the way ideas are organized to achieve a research project's purpose.". Like football plays conceptual frameworks are connected to a research purpose. Explanation is the most common type of research purpose employed in empirical research. The formal hypothesis is the framework associated with explanation. Explanatory research usually focuses on "why" or "what caused" a phenomenon to occur. Formal hypotheses posit possible explanations (answers to the why question) that are tested by collecting data and assessing the evidence (usually quantitative using statistical tests). For example, Kai Huang wanted to determine what factors contributed to residential fires in U.S. cities. Three factors were posited to influence residential fires. These factors (environment, population and building characteristics) became the hypotheses or conceptual framework he used to achieve his purpose – explain factors that influenced home fires in U.S. cities.
Views: 47957 The Audiopedia
What is ontology? Introduction to the word and the concept
 
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In a philosophical context 0:28 Why ontology is important 1:08 Ontological materialism 1:34 Ontological idealism 1:59 In a non-philosophical context 2:24 Information systems 2:40 Social ontology 3:25 The word ontology comes from two Greek words: "Onto", which means existence, or being real, and "Logia", which means science, or study. The word is used both in a philosophical and non-philosophical context. ONTOLOGY IN A PHILOSOPHICAL CONTEXT In philosophy, ontology is the study of what exists, in general. Examples of philosophical, ontological questions are: What are the fundamental parts of the world? How they are related to each other? Are physical parts more real than immaterial concepts? For example, are physical objects such as shoes more real than the concept of walking? In terms of what exists, what is the relationship between shoes and walking? Why is ontology important in philosophy? Philosophers use the concept of ontology to discuss challenging questions to build theories and models, and to better understand the ontological status of the world. Over time, two major branches of philosophical ontology has developed, namely: Ontological materialism, and ontological idealism. Ontological materialism From a philosophical perspective, ontological materialism is the belief that material things, such as particles, chemical processes, and energy, are more real, for example, than the human mind. The belief is that reality exists regardless of human observers. Ontological idealism Idealism is the belief that immaterial phenomenon, such as the human mind and consciousness, are more real, for example, than material things. The belief is that reality is constructed in the mind of the observer. ONTOLOGY IN A NON-PHILOSOPHICAL CONTEXT Outside philosophy, ontology is used in a different, more narrow meaning. Here, an ontology is the description of what exist specifically within a determined field. For example, every part that exists in a specific information system. This includes the relationship and hierarchy between these parts. Unlike the philosophers, these researchers are not primarily interested in discussing if these things are the true essence, core of the system. Nor are they discussing if the parts within the system are more real compared to the processes that take place within the system. Rather, they are focused on naming parts and processes and grouping similar ones together into categories. Outside philosophy, the word ontology is also use, for example, in social ontology. Here, the idea is to describe society and its different parts and processes. The purpose of this is to understand and describe the underlying structures that affect individuals and groups. Suggested reading You can read more about ontology in some of the many articles available online, for example: http://www.streetarticles.com/science/what-is-ontology Copyright Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 253226 Kent Löfgren
What Do Philosophers Do? - Sholom Glouberman
 
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"I work with nurses and doctors and help them understand how other people think about the work they do" Sholom Glouberman is Philosopher in Residence at Baycrest Center for Geriatric Care, He has a BA from McGill and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cornell University. For the past 25 years he has applied philosophical methods and conceptual analysis to organizations and systems. In recent years, he has focused increasingly on the notoriously intractable area of health and health care as the single most challenging and little-charted frontier. (Recorded on March 06, 2008)
Views: 1814 tvochannel
Architectural Concept & Design Process
 
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The video is presenting the meaning of Architectural Concept and the meaning of Architectural Design Process. Software Used: iMovie. Follow Us: www.facebook.com/3angleoffice
Views: 221534 3angle Office
PHILOSOPHY - Epistemology: Analyzing Knowledge #2 (No-False-Lemma and No-Defeater Approaches)
 
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If we can’t analyze knowledge simply as justified true belief, can we add one more ingredient to produce a successful analysis? In this Wireless Philosophy video, Jennifer Nagel examines two ‘extra ingredient’ analyses of knowledge: Michael Clark’s ‘no false lemma’ analysis, and the fancier ‘no undefeated defeaters’ analysis of Keith Lehrer and Thomas Paxson. Subscribe! http://bit.ly/1vz5fK9 More on Jennifer Nagel: http://bit.ly/1PLgDZZ ---- Wi-Phi @ YouTube: http://bit.ly/1PX0hLu Wi-Phi @ Khan Academy: http://bit.ly/1nQJcF7 Twitter: https://twitter.com/wirelessphi Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1XC2tx3 Instagram: @wiphiofficial ---- Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/HzVg/
Views: 56287 Wireless Philosophy
1.1 Logic & Philosophy - Basic Concepts: Arguments, Premises, Conclusions
 
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In which Monty Python makes a short appearance... Exercises: https://goo.gl/HXv7Mh
Views: 83 Roberto Ruiz
Alan Watts - An Introduction to Metaphysics
 
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The Metaphysical Approach to Life ~ Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy investigating the fundamental nature of being and the world that encompasses it. Metaphysics attempts to answer two basic questions: Ultimately, what is there? What is it like? Topics of metaphysical investigation include existence, objects and their properties, space and time, cause and effect, and possibility. A central branch of metaphysics is ontology, the investigation into the basic categories of being and how they relate to one another. Another central branch is metaphysical cosmology: which seeks to understand the origin and meaning of the universe by thought alone. There are two broad conceptions about what "world" is studied by metaphysics. The strong, classical view assumes that the objects studied by metaphysics exist independently of any observer, so that the subject is the most fundamental of all sciences. The weaker, more modern view assumes that the objects studied by metaphysics exist inside the mind of an observer, so the subject becomes a form of introspection and conceptual analysis. Some philosophers, notably Kant, discuss both of these "worlds" and what can be inferred about each one. Some philosophers and scientists, such as the logical positivists, reject the entire subject of metaphysics as meaningless, while others disagree and think that it is legitimate. ~ Many more lectures on the Alan Watts Philosophy and Metaphysics playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDrE8eovyz8DQHrs2BXdVIYgRdRMVsjOb - Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whatdoyoudesireyoutube
Views: 72549 What do you desire?
Kant & Categorical Imperatives: Crash Course Philosophy #35
 
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Our next stop on our tour of ethics is Kant’s ethics. Today Hank explains hypothetical and categorical imperatives, the universalizability principle, autonomy, and what it means to treat people as ends-in-themselves, rather than as mere means. Get your own Crash Course Philosophy mug or Chom Chom shirt from DFTBA: https://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV -- All other images and video either public domain or via VideoBlocks, or Wikimedia Commons, licensed under Creative Commons BY 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1035843 CrashCourse
Ontology, Epistemology, Methodology and Methods in Research Simplified!
 
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When you are just starting to learn about research it helps to have simple definitions of Ontology, Epistemology, Methodology and Methods in Research! More videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 http://youstudynursing.com/ Research eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GLH8R9C Related Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/youstudynursing https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam
Views: 188941 NurseKillam
The difference between Concepts Models and Theories
 
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Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd OR the PDF version here: http://books.google.ca/books/about/Research_terminology_simplified.html?id=tLMRAgAAQBAJ&redir_esc=y http://youstudynursing.com/ Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam Related Videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZw-OXXEUlQ&feature=share&list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam Knowing the difference between concepts, models and theories will help you understand research and communicate intelligently with other professionals. There are a number of ways to define concepts. Essentially a concept is a description of an event, situation or experience. Typically these descriptions of concepts are abstract and complex. Some concepts are more understood than others. It is important to define concepts so we can communicate. For example, my husband and I have different views on what defines a garage and a shed. Since we own properties with both our different definitions have caused some communication issues. When I talk about needing to clean the garage sometimes the wrong building gets cleaned. Research studies should present a conceptual or theoretical framework in the introduction portion of the article. These frameworks tell you where the researcher is coming from and define the concepts under study. It helps to know how a researcher views the concepts under study so you can determine if you or other studies you are looking at define these concepts in the same way. That way you know if they are studying a shed or a garage. Sometimes researchers will describe what is known about the concepts without a model or theory. In this case it is called a conceptual framework. Other times they will present at specific model or theory to describe how the concepts that they will be studying relate to one another. However, before models and theories can be developed, concepts need to be defined. There are specific methods to define concepts for research. The methods chosen will depend on your beliefs about the nature of the concept. If you believe concepts are concrete, measurable and do not change your approach will search for the truth about the concepts. Concepts that are defined in this way may be the variables under study in quantitative research. However, if you think that concepts are influenced by context, recognisable (but not measurable) and dynamic your approach would be much different. Concepts that are defined in this way would be more congruent as a framework for qualitative research. To find out more about how concepts are developed please visit the video on your screen. Often research will examine the relationships between and among various concepts. A framework that shows these relationships may be in the form of a model or a theory. Models are usually developed based on qualitative research. They demonstrate the researcher's interpretation of how concepts are related to one another. You may find models in the findings section of some research articles. Sometimes models are based on understandings that are not from specific research studies. For example, the picture on this slide represents a model of my understanding of the difference between concepts, models and theories. Theories on the other hand are more tested than models. They are systematic and are used to explain, predict, describe and prescribe phenomena. They look a lot like models so sometimes people confuse these two terms. Theories are tested and measured, most of the time with quantitative research, in order to prove the relationships between concepts. It takes a lot more than one research study to prove a theory. Qualitative research can also be done to support theories. The more research that supports a theory the better it is. Remember, Concepts need to be defined in order to build a model or a theory. Both models and theories show proposed relationships between concepts. The difference between a model and a theory is the amount of "proof" that exists for them, which stems from how they were developed. Models are not considered proven. Theories are considered proven and supported by multiple research studies. That is why they are viewed as a more systematic representation of phenomena. For more please visit the videos on this slide and subscribe. Thank you for watching. Don't forget to like this video if you found it helpful. Music from http://www.freestockmusic.com/
Views: 88652 NurseKillam
Maria Kon: Conceptual Analysis and Quantum Gravity
 
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Chicago 2013 - Beyond Spacetime Conference: beyondspacetime.net
Views: 177 Beyond Spacetime
Seismic Conceptual Design of Building I Principles I Earthquake Resistant Design
 
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This video is all about taking care of 36 principles (as suggested by Hugo Bachmann) while designing building structures by Engineers, Architects, Building Owners and Local Authorities..! II Why it is required? II In an earthquake, seismic waves arise from sudden movements in a rupture zone (active fault) in the earth's crust. Waves of different types and velocities travel different paths before reaching a building’s site and subjecting the local ground to various motions. The ground moves rapidly back and forth in all directions, usually mainly horizontally, but also vertically. If the ground moves rapidly back and forth, then the foundations of the building are forced to follow these movements. The upper part of the building however would prefer to remain where it is because of its mass of inertia. This causes strong vibrations of the structure with resonance phenomena between the structure and the ground, and thus large internal forces. This frequently results in plastic deformation of the structure and substantial damage with local failures and, in extreme cases, collapse. Therefore buildings must be designed to cover considerable uncertainties and variations. Now, Watch the video to learn how can we take care of our buildings. If not, than what we pay. ===================================================== Share, Support & Subscribe..!! If you enjoyed this video..., please LIKE, SHARE and make your valuable COMMENT on my videos. Also, give SUGGESTIONS for next videos that you want from my side..., I really appreciate it..., as I plan to make videos every week. ===================================================== Connect with me..!! ■ Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/DrChiragNPatel ■ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cnpatel693 ■ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DrChiragNPatel ■ Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+DrChiragNPatel ■ Email: [email protected] ===================================================== About..!! Dr. Chirag N. Patel is a YouTube Channel, where you will find videos based on various engineering technology, as well as lectures related to civil engineering discipline and many more…, New Video is Posted in very short time frame.
Views: 28017 Dr. Chirag N. Patel
The Interjacent Intellectual: Conceptual Struggles for Authenticity in Three Indian Philosophers
 
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Jonardon Ganeri, Professor of Philosophy; NYU Abu Dhabi Global Network Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, New York University Recorded on February 3, 2017. For Surendranatha Dasgupta and his contemporaries in late colonial and early post-colonial India, the “impossible meeting” of East and West was not an abstract puzzle in the theory of interculturalism but a challenge to find an authentic interpretation of lived experience. What does authenticity consist in for a thinker as much rooted in two life-worlds, and as much thereby alienated from either? In the philosophical and non-philosophical writings of S. Dasgupta, K.C. Bhattacharya, A.C. Mukherji, S. Radhakrishnan, and others, questions of selfhood and subjectivity became, for good reason, dominant preoccupations. I will speak about their explorations of the phenomenology of interjacency and its relationship to the search for authenticity. Jonardon Ganeri’s research interests are in consciousness, self, attention, the epistemology of inquiry, the idea of philosophy as a practice and its relationship with literary form, case-based reasoning, multiple-category ontologies, non-classical logics, realism in the theory of meaning, the history of ideas in early modern South Asia, the polycentricity of modernity, cosmopolitanism and cross-cultural hermeneutics, intellectual affinities between India, Greece and China, and early Buddhist philosophy of mind. Ganeri teaches courses in the philosophy of mind, the nature of subjectivity, Buddhist philosophy, the history of Indian philosophical traditions. He also supervises PhDs on Indian philosophical texts in classical Sanskrit. Ganeri’s books include Attention, Not Self; The Self: Naturalism, Consciousness, and the First-Person Stance; The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India 1450–1700; The Concealed Art of the Soul; and Philosophy in Classical India: The Proper Work of Reason. He has published in Mind, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Isis, New Literary History, Philosophy and Literature, Synthese, Analysis, Philosophy, in major Indology journals, and is on the editorial boards of The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Philosophy East & West, Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research, the Journal of Hindu Studies and other journals and monograph series. Ganeri is currently editing the Oxford Handbook of Indian Philosophy, drafting scripts about Indian Philosophy for the podcast History of Philosophy without any Gaps, and thinking about philosophy, cosmopolitanism, and anti-coloniality. Ganeri advocates an expanded role for cross-cultural methodologies in philosophical research, together with enhanced cultural diversity in the philosophical curriculum. He strives to collaborate with philosophers, phenomenologists, cognitive scientists, historians, anthropologists, sinologists, persianists, buddhologists, classicists, and logicians. Ganeria is an Affiliated Faculty member of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, and laureate of the Infosys Prize in the Humanities. He has been named by Open Magazine one of India’s “50 Open Minds” in 2016. Cosponsored by the Departments of Philosophy and Asian Languages and Cultures.
The Many Philosophical Positions on the  Free Will Problem
 
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Just as there are a large number of conflicting interpretations of quantum mechanics (which we will examine carefully in future lectures), there is an equally large number of positions on the problem of free will defended by modern academic philosophers. Since their positions are in fundamental disagreement with one another, they cannot possibly all be correct. Perhaps they should just be seen as staking out niches in the continuing verbal jousting that is analytic language philosophy, just a variety of concepts for their claims to teach "clear conceptual analysis"?  The free will section of the informationphilosopher.com website has links to more than one hundred web pages describing the concepts in the free will debates. and there is a massively hyperlinked glossary that relates the jargon terms to one another. See http://informationphilosopher.com/freedom/ and http://informationphilosopher.com/afterwords/glossary/ Determinism is the position that every event is caused, the inevitable and necessary consequence of antecedent events, in a chain of events with just one possible future. "Hard" and "soft" determinism are terms invented by William James, who lamented the fact that some determinists were co-opting the term freedom for themselves. He called them "soft" determinists, because, abhoring harsh words like fatality, necessity, and even predetermination, they say determinism’s "real name is freedom; for freedom is only necessity understood, and bondage to the highest is identical with true freedom." "Hard" determinists deny the existence of free will. "Soft" determinists co-opt the term. Compatibilism is the most common name used today for James' category of soft determinism. For compatibilists, free will is compatible with determinism. Semicompatibilists are agnostic about free will and determinism, but claim that moral responsibility is compatible with determinism. Narrow incompatibilism is a similar concept. Hard incompatibilists think both free will and moral responsibility are not compatible with determinism (they mean pre-determinism). Illusionists are hard incompatibilists, who say that free will is an illusion. They usually deny moral responsibility, but some say we can preserve responsibility by maintaining the illusion. Impossibilists are also hard incompatibilists. They say moral responsibility is impossible. Incompatibilism is the idea that free will and determinism are incompatible. Incompatibilists include both hard determinists and libertarians. Incompatibilists include both hard determinists and libertarians (both yellow in the taxonomy). This confuses the debate by analytic language philosophers - who are normally committed to clear and unambiguous concepts - and adds difficulties for students of philosophy. Source and Leeway Incompatibilism locate indeterminism in the Actual Sequence or Alternative Sequences. The first in each pair breaks the causal chain in the actual sequence, the last pair provide alternative possibilities in alternative sequences.
Views: 251 infophilosopher
Architecture Short Course: How to Develop a Design Concept
 
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All architecture begins with a concept. If you’re struggling to find one, curious about what one is, or wondering how architects begin their projects; this short course will walk you through the process I use and some of the techniques I rely on to develop architectural concepts all illustrated with one of my residential projects. Design is a dialogue, and the concept ensures you have something to talk about. In this video I discuss the precise steps I take when beginning each project and how those steps lead me to an architectural concept. Before we can develop the concept, we have to first understand the practical constraints. My design process begins only after gathering and assessing all the given parameters for a project. Now, this primarily consists of three types of information. There’s information derived from the site - things like: local climate, the prevailing winds, the solar aspect, vegetation, neighboring structures, the site’s history, and any unique liabilities or opportunities. The site of course also comes along with legal frameworks for development, which describe where and what we can and can’t build. The second type of information we’ll gather is from the client. Every client has a set of cultural beliefs and preconceptions, preferences and agendas. Of course, we’ll want to determine their budget, and understand the personality traits and organizational politics which might also shape the design. The client and the building type together determine what architects call, “the program” which is essentially a detailed accounting of all the spaces the building will contain. And the third type of information I gather is related to the building typology – is it a museum, a home…or a school for example? To learn about a building typology we often conduct an analysis of notable or relevant historical precedents. We want to know the essential problems these types of structures grapple with. Understanding the history of the archetype allows us to approach a problem from a fresh perspective. All of this is necessary information that we collect for every project. This inventory can also serve as the progenitor for the design concept – our seed idea. And, rather than shunting creativity, these constraints often incite the creative process. Concept Inspirations Discussed: - Site - Client - Narrative - Materials - Structural - Mainifestos - Formal As with a good film, the setting, the characters, the cinematography, and the plot all conspire to make it what it is. It’s the experience you’ll recall rather than the concept per se. Sure, the concept sets the film in motion and it’s the starting point for all that follows. But this concept – the one or two-line description – can’t possible capture the richness and depth of the finished film…or in our case the architecture. Yet without it, the work is unfulfilling and so it should be clear that the concept is necessary for all our work as architects. // GEAR I USE // DSLR CAMERA: * Canon 70D: http://amzn.to/29klz7k LENSES: * Canon 24mm f2.8 Lens: http://amzn.to/29l7ac5 * Canon 40mm f2.8 Lens: http://amzn.to/29x2QcI AUDIO: * Rode VideoMic Pro (hotshoe mtd.): http://amzn.to/29qlNM3 * ATR-2100 USB (dynamic mic): http://amzn.to/2dFDaKp ARCHITECTURE GEAR: * Prismacolor Markers: http://thirtybyforty.com/markers * Timelapse Camera: http://thirtybyforty.com/brinno * AutoCAD LT: http://amzn.to/2dxjMDH * SketchUp PRO: http://amzn.to/2cRcojz * HP T120 Plotter: http://amzn.to/2dBGf1O * Adobe CC Photography (Photoshop/Lightroom) Plan: http://amzn.to/2dhq5ap STARTUP TOOLKIT: * Architect + Entrepreneur Startup Toolkit: http://thirtybyforty.com/SPL -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Is THIS an Architecture Practice? The Undercover Architect Part 2" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=242zhcF0b5A -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 525845 30X40 Design Workshop
Cyberdojang.com: PCT - Philosophy, Concepts & Theory on Learning
 
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Cyberdojang.com: Positioning from Kneeling Duck-under Variations by CyberDojang (videos) 4:05 Here's the preview of the latest Cyberdojang.com lessons taught by Hwa Rang Do Grandmaster Taejoon Lee. In this session, he gives a short talk on how to listen and see to understand the truth. www.cyberdojang.com. The official online school of Hwa Rang Do Grandmaster Taejoon Lee. Hope to see you there. Hope you enjoyed our preview. Please join us at www.cyberdojang.com.
Views: 1137 Hwa Rang Do
The Nature of Causation: Hume & the Regularity Theory
 
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Marianne Talbot gives the first talk in a series on the nature of causation at Oxford. This talk explores the regularity theory of causation, first articulated by David Hume, based on his empiricist conception of knowledge... Causation is an important concept that we all use in ordinary, everyday life, as well as in science. Causation is so important in fact that it has been said that: “With regard to our total conceptual apparatus, causation is the centre of the centre”, and it has been called called ‘the cement of the universe’. But what exactly is causation? In these lectures, the most influential theories of causation are introduced, as well as the motivations for them, the arguments behind them, and the problems they face. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBHxLhKiPKxC4gD_Jys3bsfprad70EGZu This is from the University of Oxford -- Creative Commons.
Views: 10841 Philosophy Overdose
Intro to Aesthetics | Philosophy Tube
 
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What's the definition of 'art'? A pretty fundamental question in aesthetics - the philosophy of art. I explain the basic theories, citing Wittgenstein and George Dickie, among others, touching on art history and modern art today. Subscribe! http://tinyurl.com/pr99a46 Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Audible: http://tinyurl.com/jn6tpup FAQ: http://tinyurl.com/j8bo4gb Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/jgjek5w Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: [email protected] Google+: google.com/+thephilosophytube realphilosophytube.tumblr.com Recommended Reading: Dickie, The Art Circle, 1984. Noël Carroll, “Art, Practice and Narrative,” in The Monist, 1988. Jerrold Levinson, “Defining Art Historically,” in British Journal of Aesthetics, 1979 Gregory Currie, “Aliens, Too,” in Analysis, 1993 Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations Morris Weitz, “The Role of Theory in Aesthetics,” in The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 1956 Christy Mag Uidhir & P.D. Magnus, “Art Concept Pluralism,” in Metaphilosophy, 2011 William Kennick, “Does Traditional Aesthetics Rest on a Mistake?” in Mind, 1958. Music by Epidemic Sound (Epidemicsound.com) If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to those who might not otherwise have access to it in exchange for credits on the show, please get in touch! Any copyrighted material should fall under fair use for educational purposes or commentary, but if you are a copyright holder and believe your material has been used unfairly please get in touch with us and we will be happy to discuss it.
Views: 47305 Philosophy Tube
The Given, Kant, & Hegel - John McDowell Conference
 
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Another few talks from a conference on the work of John McDowell and his famous work "Mind and World". These talks focus on issues regarding the nature of experience and the role of the conceptual and normative, especially in connection to the philosophical views of Kant and Hegel... The first talk (0:00) was given by Robert Hanna - "The Myth of The Given & The Grip of The Given". The second talk (34:54) was given by M. M. Merritt - "Cognitive Virtue & Cognitive Self-Determination". The third talk (1:04:04) was given by Paul Redding - "McDowell & The Propositionality of Perceptional Content Thesis". Then lastly (1:40:00) John McDowell responds and a discussion follows. This is part of a 2010 conference called "Engaging McDowell". More talks from the conference can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3tWoqf_nd4.
Views: 4398 Philosophy Overdose
Green Death - Sholom Glouberman
 
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"Plant dead people in parks, buried fresh, returning to the earth in an appropriate way" Sholom Glouberman is Philosopher in Residence at Baycrest Center for Geriatric Care, He has a BA from McGill and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cornell University. For the past 25 years he has applied philosophical methods and conceptual analysis to organizations and systems. In recent years, he has focused increasingly on the notoriously intractable area of health and health care as the single most challenging and little-charted frontier. (Recorded on March 06, 2008)
Views: 93 tvochannel
PHYSICAL SCIENCE - 9 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS
 
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sub : EDUCATION Course Name: B.ED Keyword: Swayamprabha
Neurophilosophy on the way of solving problems. Interview with Patricia Churchland in Moscow.
 
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Patricia Churchland is trying to combine philosophy, neuroscience and evolutionary biology toward consciousness studies by her own approach of neurophilosophy. In that interview discussed the following questions: What is eliminativism and its difference from identity theory? Could armchair philosophy and conceptual analysis be worth applying to the consciousness problem? In what way philosophers and cognitive scientists should communicate? What is meaning of life? and many others. Черчленд пытается объединить философские исследования проблем сознания, природы морали с данными нейронауки и эволюционной биологии. По общему мнению, её позицию причисляют к элиминативному материализму, то есть полному отрицанию существования сознания. Однако Черчленд заявляет, что это не так, скорее речь идёт об отрицании понятия сознания, имеющего отношение к народной или стихийной психологии, которой мы привыкли пользоваться без должной рефлексии. Но в каком тогда смысле сознание существует? Может ли классическая кабинетная философия и концептуальный анализ дать ответ на проблему сознания? Каким видится союз философов и когнитивных ученых? На эти и многие другие вопросы Патрисия Черчленд отвечает в течение интервью в яркой и очень живой манере.
Paths of Philosophical Inquiry
 
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University of Montana, College of Humanities and Sciences, Philosophy Department
The Definition of Morality - Part 5 of 5
 
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Stephen Stich takes us on a journey through recent moral philosophy, meta-ethics, numerous studies in moral psychology, a discussion of the moral/conventional task, and some interesting moral dilemmas, in an attempt to define morality. Lots of interesting things to consider. Stich is primarily known in philosophy for his work in the philosophy of mind, cognitive science, epistemology, and moral psychology. In philosophy of mind and cognitive science, Stich (1983) has argued for a form of eliminative materialism—the view that talk of the mental should be replaced with talk of its physical substrate. Since then, however, he has changed some of his views on the mind. See Deconstructing the Mind (1996) for his more recent views. In epistemology, he has explored (with several of his colleagues) the nature of intuitions using the techniques of experimental philosophy, especially epistemic intuitions that vary among cultures. This work reflects a general skepticism about conceptual analysis and the traditional methods of analytic philosophy. In The Fragmentation of Reason he briefly sketched a form of epistemic relativism "in the spirit of pragmatism." http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~stich/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Stich http://www.semionet.com/FR/default.htm
Views: 1173 riversonthemoon
Philosophical Foundations of Episodic Memory: A Conceptual Analysis / Nara Figueiredo
 
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O Workshop ‘Mental Time Travel’ e Agência Moral será uma série de seis comunicações e debates entre os participantes com foco no conceito de ‘mental time travel’ tal como é utilizado nas ciências cognitivas, na psicologia moral e na filosofia da mente. Portanto, como instrumento teórico para descrever nossa capacidade de projeção no tempo, seja para recuperar memórias episódicas autobiográficas, seja para antecipar imaginativamente nossas reações em possíveis cenários futuros. O interesse do workshop é discutir a necessidade de ‘mental time travel’ para agência moral.
Views: 24 Filosofia Unisinos
What is Health? - Sholom Glouberman
 
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"Cancer is not like cholera. It's not one disease, but many" Sholom Glouberman is Philosopher in Residence at Baycrest Center for Geriatric Care, He has a BA from McGill and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cornell University. For the past 25 years he has applied philosophical methods and conceptual analysis to organizations and systems. In recent years, he has focused increasingly on the notoriously intractable area of health and health care as the single most challenging and little-charted frontier. (Recorded on March 06, 2008)
Views: 429 tvochannel
Thinking About Death - Sholom Glouberman
 
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"A colleague of mine, a rabbi, attends deaths. He is not attending the death of a person, He is attending the family's response too it" Sholom Glouberman is Philosopher in Residence at Baycrest Center for Geriatric Care, He has a BA from McGill and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cornell University. For the past 25 years he has applied philosophical methods and conceptual analysis to organizations and systems. In recent years, he has focused increasingly on the notoriously intractable area of health and health care as the single most challenging and little-charted frontier. (Recorded on March 06, 2008)
Views: 346 tvochannel
White Supremacist Propaganda Vs Truth | Philosophy Tube
 
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We need to understand how white supremacist propaganda works and what it tells us about communication and truth. Let’s look at the myth of the Irish Slaves, and the myth of White Genocide… Subscribe! http://tinyurl.com/pr99a46 Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Paypal.me/PhilosophyTube Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/jgjek5w Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: [email protected] Recommended Reading: Satre, “Anti-Semite and Jew” http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic468841.files/Sartre__Anti-Semite_and_Jew.pdf Hannah Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism http://tinyurl.com/jb2j68m Eric Williams, Capitalism and Slavery http://tinyurl.com/hh8xfn3 Harsha Walia, Undoing Border Imperialism http://tinyurl.com/jcto6gd Liam Hogan, “Debunking the Imagery of the “Irish Slaves” Meme,” https://medium.com/@Limerick1914/the-imagery-of-the-irish-slaves-myth-dissected-143e70aa6e74#.3eykakw0p Donald Davidson, “On the Very Idea of a Conceptual Scheme,” in Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association Folding Ideas, Triumph of the Will and the Cinematic Language of Propaganda: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJ1Qm1Z_D7w ContraPoints, Why White Nationalism is Wrong, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-c2qnfUNXE Music by Epidemic Sound (Epidemicsound.com) If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to those who might not otherwise have access to it in exchange for credits on the show, please get in touch! Any copyrighted material should fall under fair use for educational purposes or commentary, but if you are a copyright holder and believe your material has been used unfairly please get in touch with us and we will be happy to discuss it.
Views: 98013 Philosophy Tube
The Definition of Morality - Part 4 of 5
 
09:51
Stephen Stich takes us on a journey through recent moral philosophy, meta-ethics, numerous studies in moral psychology, a discussion of the moral/conventional task, and some interesting moral dilemmas, in an attempt to define morality. Lots of interesting things to consider. Stich is primarily known in philosophy for his work in the philosophy of mind, cognitive science, epistemology, and moral psychology. In philosophy of mind and cognitive science, Stich (1983) has argued for a form of eliminative materialism—the view that talk of the mental should be replaced with talk of its physical substrate. Since then, however, he has changed some of his views on the mind. See Deconstructing the Mind (1996) for his more recent views. In epistemology, he has explored (with several of his colleagues) the nature of intuitions using the techniques of experimental philosophy, especially epistemic intuitions that vary among cultures. This work reflects a general skepticism about conceptual analysis and the traditional methods of analytic philosophy. In The Fragmentation of Reason he briefly sketched a form of epistemic relativism "in the spirit of pragmatism." http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~stich/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Stich http://www.semionet.com/FR/default.htm
Views: 1023 riversonthemoon
Antony Flew's Conversion from Atheism
 
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2004. "It has become inordinately difficult even to begin to think about constructing a naturalistic theory of the evolution of that first reproducing organism." Renowned author and atheist Anthony Flew speaks to his conversion from Atheism to Deism. Anthony Flew's works: A New Approach to Psychical Research (1953) New Essays in Philosophical Theology (1955) editor with Alasdair Macintyre Essays in Conceptual Analysis (1956) Hume's Philosophy of Belief (1961) Logic And Language (1961) editor Flew, Antony (1966), God and Philosophy. Flew, Antony, ed. (1966), Logic & Language, Second. Evolutionary Ethics (1967) An Introduction to Western Philosophy -- Ideas and Argument from Plato to Sartre (1971) Body, Mind and Death (1973) Crime or Disease (1973) Thinking About Thinking (1975) Sociology, Equality and Education: Philosophical Essays In Defence of A Variety of Differences (1976) Thinking Straight, 1977, A Dictionary of Philosophy (1979) editor, later edition with Stephen Priest Philosophy, an Introduction (1979) Libertarians versus Egalitarians (c. 1980) pamphlet The Politics of Procrustes: contradictions of enforced equality (1981) Darwinian Evolution (1984) Flew, Antony (1984) [The Presumption of Atheism, 1976], God, Freedom and Immortality: A Critical Analysis (reprint ed.). Examination not Attempted in Right Ahead, newspaper of the Conservative Monday Club, Conservative Party Conference edition, October 1985. God: A Critical Inquiry (1986) -- reprint of God and Philosophy (1966) with new introduction David Hume: Philosopher of Moral Science (1986) Oxford: Basil Blackwell. Flew, Antony; Vesey, Godfrey Norman Agmondis (1987), Agency and Necessity, Great Debates in Philosophy. Did Jesus Rise From the Dead? The Resurrection Debate (1987) with Gary Habermas Power to the Parents: Reversing Educational Decline (1987) "Prophesy or Philosophy? Historicism or History?", Marx Refuted, Bath, UK, 1987, Readings in the Philosophical Problems of Parapsychology (1987) editor God, A Critical Inquiry (1988) Does God Exist?: A Believer and an Atheist Debate (1991) with Terry L. Miethe A Future for Anti-Racism? (Social Affairs Unit 1992) pamphlet Atheistic Humanism, 1993, ISBN 978-0-87975-847-9. Thinking About Social Thinking, 1995. Education for Citizenship, Studies in Education (10), Institute of Economic Affairs, 2000. Merely Mortal? (2000) Equality in Liberty and Justice (2001) Transaction Publishers. Does God Exist: The Craig-Flew Debate (2003) with William Lane Craig (ISBN 978-0-7546-3190-3) Social Life and Moral Judgment (2003) God and Philosophy (2005) -- another reprint of God and Philosophy (1966) with another new introduction There is a God: How the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (2007) with Roy Abraham Varghese
Views: 17848 Max Bauer
The Counterfactual Theory of Causation
 
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Marianne Talbot gives the second talk in a series on the nature of causation at Oxford. This talk explores the counterfactual conception of causation, which is the idea that an event c causes event e if and only if had c not had occurred e would not have occurred either. It has its roots in Hume, but was made precise in the 20th century by David Lewis and others... Causation is an important concept that we all use in ordinary, everyday life, as well as in science. Causation is so important in fact that it has been said that: “With regard to our total conceptual apparatus, causation is the centre of the centre”, and it has been called called ‘the cement of the universe’. But what exactly is causation? In these lectures, the most influential theories of causation are introduced, as well as the motivations for them, the arguments behind them, and the problems they face. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBHxLhKiPKxC4gD_Jys3bsfprad70EGZu This is from the University of Oxford -- Creative Commons.
Views: 7205 Philosophy Overdose
Conceptual knowledge about life with example. Must watch. :-)
 
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Hey guys. Don't forget to like and subscribe for more videos. :-)
Views: 133 Ahmi 7
Ontology, Epistemology, and Methodology - Research Methodology Course (Self-Study) - Session 2
 
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Ontology, Epistemology, Methodology How it could be reflected in your research report? The second session in MIS Research Methodology Course (Self-Study) If you need one to one help, I charge 40 GBP per hour offer one-to-one help and 2 GBP for reading each page. I do not write (no writing service) to anyone. I just offer counseling. I can help in research methodology, literature review, and analysis. Furthermore, I offer regular meeting with PhD and master students to follow up with them If you are interested please contact me. Skype: amgad_1985
Views: 230247 Amgad Badewi
MODULE 1 unit 4 Philosophy and other Disciplines contents
 
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Beside the four traditional branches of philosophy that you have learned above, there are other branches of philosophy which are often referred to as the philosophy of the infrastructure of disciplines. This study unit introduces you to the analysis of the relationship between philosophy and some other disciplines.
Views: 63 NOUN CE&GS
Living with Nature - Sholom Glouberman
 
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"We can't reduce nature to a series of laws that will allow us to have this kind of complete deterministic control over it" Sholom Glouberman is Philosopher in Residence at Baycrest Center for Geriatric Care, He has a BA from McGill and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cornell University. For the past 25 years he has applied philosophical methods and conceptual analysis to organizations and systems. In recent years, he has focused increasingly on the notoriously intractable area of health and health care as the single most challenging and little-charted frontier. (Recorded on March 06, 2008)
Views: 106 tvochannel
What is Philosophical Race Theory? - Paul Taylor (Modern Critical Theory Lecture Series)
 
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The Unit for Criticism & Interpretive Theory at UIUC presents Paul Taylor (Penn State U) on "What is Philosophical Race Theory?" as part of the Fall 2016 Modern Critical Theory Lecture Series. The lecture was presented on November 1st in Lincoln Hall, at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Visit the Unit for Criticism website: https://criticism.english.illinois.edu/
Views: 798 Unit Fellows