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What If Ocean Water Lost Its Salt
 
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Lots of people on certain parts of continents don’t have access to fresh water from rivers or lakes, and this crisis is getting more and more serious each year. Every 7th person on the planet suffers from a lack of access to clean drinkable water right now. And some experts say that as the world population doubles by 2030, that statistic will skyrocket to one-half! Actually, 97% of all the water on the planet has always been briny, and you can safely assume that it’s this way for a reason. …So magically pushing a button to make it fresh water in this hypothetical situation would be devastating for life on this planet. And here's why. Other videos you might like: What If Megalodon Sharks Didn't Go Extinct? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh6pVbaEJTw& What If You Were the Last Person on Earth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uGAINMAiL0& What If You Poured Some Water On The Sun? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GOPAxEBDro TIMESTAMPS: Why the ocean is salty 1:44 Was seawater originally fresh? 3:08 Food chains would be destroyed 4:15 How the climate would change 5:36 Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - Rivers constantly bring fresh water to the oceans. You’d think these sources would dilute the sea and decrease the salt content. But in fact, it’s quite the opposite. Water in rivers is also brackish – it’s just 70 times less salty than in the ocean. - Each year 4 billion tons of salt are carried into the ocean just from rivers alone. If you keep doing that for the billions of years this planet has been in existence, you can imagine how much salt would gather there. - Sea salt derives from a hydrochloric acid, while river salts are from carbonic acid. More scientists today believe that the oceans have been salty from the start because of volcanic activity. - The most obvious consequence is that the innumerable forms of marine life can only exist in briny water – they wouldn’t survive in fresh water. - Without them, we’d lose this source of food, which would have a serious impact on not only the countries that are highly dependent on their fishery sectors, but also those they export to! - Like animals, algae are capable of feeding on organic material in their environment. Like plants, they take part in photosynthesis. They play a huge role in sustaining life because of this. - Ocean currents make the climate on earth a lot more tolerable and suitable for living. Take salt from the oceans, and the currents will disappear. Salt water has a much lower freezing temperature too. Without the salt, bigger parts of the oceans would turn to ice during the winter. - Plus, all that salt would eventually start appearing right back in the oceans! Minerals from the Earth’s crust would start dissolving into the sea again, and oceanic floor vents would also pump minerals into the water. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Photos: https://www.depositphotos.com East News ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 282497 BRIGHT SIDE
What Happens If You Drain The Ocean?
 
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The oceans cover the majority of Earth, so what if you drain them? The first 200 people to sign up get 20% off Brilliant: https://brilliant.org/lifenoggin/ Subscribe: https://bit.ly/SubLifeNoggin | Get your exclusive Life Noggin merch: http://keeponthinking.co Support Life Noggin on Patreon: https://patreon.com/LifeNogginStudios Follow Life Noggin! Facebook: https://facebook.com/LifeNoggin/?ref=br_rs Instagram: https://instagram.com/lifenoggin/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/lifenoggin Official Website: https://lnstudios.co/ Watch More Life Noggin: Latest Uploads: https://youtube.com/watch?v=4A6XkYpmidU&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6JtEDRfRMyb6rFd1acqYSlO Big Questions: https://youtube.com/watch?v=rJTkHGXMdb0&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6LtaKh-Eqj7Cs4Tmf5iQPx4 Outer Space: https://youtube.com/watch?v=rJTkHGXMdb0&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6IPWXQvW3Exk9bqGzOdj8Qq Inside the Human Body: https://youtube.com/watch?v=FVnnM6hZ7Wk&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6JoZQ-Sy3eK2rjiDsamxCQs Popular Videos: https://youtube.com/watch?v=1bVfzBD-40E&list=PL8L0MzSk_V6IYeU-cNGR6NYHW19GMiPNy We are LIFE NOGGIN! An animated and educational web show designed to teach you all about your awesome life and the brain that makes you able to live it! We answer questions about everything from inside the human body to deep outer space. Stay tuned for more videos on every Monday and Thursday! Keep On Thinking. Life Noggin Team: Director/Voice - Pat Graziosi: http://lifenogg.in/PatGraziosi Executive Producer - Ian Dokie: http://instagram.com/iandokie Director of Marketing - Jared Oban: http://lifenogg.in/JaredOban Animation by Robert Grisham Written by Sophie Bakoledis Sources: https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/oceanwater.html https://www.nationalgeographic.org/media/why-ocean-matters/ https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/ocean-human-health.html http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/blue_planet/open_ocean/ocean_importance/ https://www.nationalgeographic.org/activity/save-the-plankton-breathe-freely/ https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/facts/climate.html https://climatekids.nasa.gov/review/greenhouse-effect/ https://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/oceanography/ocean-earth-system/ocean-water-cycle http://discoverymindblown.com/articles/why-does-it-rain/ https://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=460 https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-does-combining-hydrog/ https://www.reuters.com/article/us-space-mars/solar-wind-turned-mars-into-dry-cold-planet-study-idUSKBN1712S4 https://www.space.com/33758-venus-habitable-for-billions-of-years.html
Views: 732049 Life Noggin
How Deep Is the Ocean In Reality?
 
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A whopping 94% of all life-forms on Earth are aquatic. Such a huge number of living beings who can't survive without water is understandable. After all, more than 70% of our planet's surface is covered with water. The World Ocean includes the Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, the Indian Ocean, and the Arctic Ocean. There's enough water in the oceans to fill a 685-mile-long bathtub! One of the main nagging questions people have been asking for ages is "How deep is the ocean in reality?" Let’s find an answer to it. #marianatrench #deepplace #deepocean TIMESTAMPS Sunlit zone 1:21 Twilight zone 6:17 Midnight zone 10:19 The abyss 13:17 Trench zone 14:25 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -The Sunlit zone stretches from 14.5 ft, that is is the depth of a standard Olympic diving pool, to 561 ft under the water’s surface, where RMS Carpathia found her last dwelling. This ship became famous after her participation in the rescue of the Titanic survivors. -At 656 ft, the twilight zone begins. That's where you can see the giant oarfish. At a depth of 1,453 ft, you could reach the height of the Empire State Building if somebody powerful enough decided to submerge it under the water. The giant squid lives as deep as 2,952 ft below the surface. This is where the Twilight zone ends. -At a depth of 3,608 ft, there's the deepest volcano recorded by scientists. At 12,795 ft below the water’s surface, there are Air France flight 447 black boxes. Airbus A330 crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009. This is where the Midnight zone ends. -At a depth of 13,123 ft, the midnight zone ends, and the abyss lies ahead. 18,897 ft is the bottom of the abyss and the depth at which you can find the deepest shipwreck. SS Rio Grande sunk in 1941 in the South Atlantic and was discovered only in 1996. -At a depth of 19,685 ft, the abyss ends and gives way to the trench zone. At a depth of 36,070 ft, you will reach the very bottom of the ocean in its deepest point known to man: Challenger Deep. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 4735963 BRIGHT SIDE
4 Tips on How to Stay Safe at Sea
 
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How to Stay Safe at Sea Summer is a great time to enjoy the sun and the seaside, but both the beach and the sea can be full of dangers. To stay safe and protect your family you have know how to deal with all kinds of unexpected situations that can happen in the water. So grab a pen and paper and get ready to take note of these general safety rules when it comes to resting at the seaside. Don’t forget to pack all the beach necessities 0:55 You absolutely need to pack a first aid kit with medications for a variety of emergencies, prescriptions and devices like inhalers or EpiPens, sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, coolers with ice, plenty of bottled water, drinks and food. What to do if you’ve spotted a shark 1:44 Statistically, you have more chances of drowning somewhere near the beach or even being struck by lightning than becoming a victim of a shark attack. Still, it’s better to be safe than sorry. Be careful what you wear: sharks can negatively react to bright colors or shiny things. If you've spotted a shark, stay calm and concentrate on getting away and out of the water. Check for signs of aggression indicating that the animal is about to attack. If an attack seems inevitable, take a defensive position. Try to put a solid object between you and the animal. If there’s nothing at hand, the best way to scare a shark away is to scratch at its eyes or gills. How to avoid a jellyfish sting 6:02 Choose an area where you can swim safely. If you know that there are jellyfish around, avoid that place. If you’ve been stung by a jellyfish, get out of the water and stay calm. Don't touch or scratch the place of the sting because there might still be some tentacles attached to your skin. Pour some sea water over the affected area and leave it, don’t dry it off with a towel or anything. Then, pour a generous amount of vinegar over the tentacles in your skin and let it sit for at least half a minute. To relieve the pain, submerge the injured part of your body in warm water (about 110°F). What to do if you've stepped on a sea urchin 8:36 Make sure you’re not feeling any chest pain, nausea, or difficulty breathing. If you are, call emergency services. And if not, start by removing all the spines. Use tweezers to pull them out, especially if the ends of the spines are protruding. If they’re not, you can use hot wax. Once you’re sure that there are no spines left in your body, clean the wound with soap and water. What to do if you’ve been pulled into a rip current 9:50 Before going into the water, check for any suspicious-looking channels. Places with rip currents can be foamier or, on the contrary, quieter than others. If you've still got caught by the current, stay calm, it won't pull you underwater. If you start swimming parallel to the shore, you’ll manage to escape its pull. Music: Better_Than_It_Used_To_Be https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music TIMESTAMPS Beach necessities 0:55 What to do if you’ve spotted a shark 1:44 How to avoid a jellyfish sting 6:02 What to do if you've stepped on a sea urchin 8:36 What to do if you’ve been pulled into a rip current 9:50 SUMMARY -You absolutely need to pack a first aid kit with medications for a variety of emergencies, prescriptions and devices like inhalers or EpiPens, sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, coolers with ice, plenty of bottled water, drinks and food. -Never go into the water if there’s a posted warning on the beach. Don’t swim at night or at dawn or dusk. In the extremely rare instance of a prolonged deadly encounter, try to put a solid object between you and the animal (for example, a diving mask or surfboard). Don't stop fighting, this way the shark will get the message that you’re not worth all the trouble. -Pay attention to warning signs and watch for purple flags. That's the international sign that you’ll most likely encounter jellyfish in the water. If you see a jellyfish that’s washed ashore, don't touch it. -Start by removing all the spines. Use tweezers to pull them out, especially if the ends of the spines are protruding. If they’re not, you can use hot wax. Put it on the affected area, wait for it to dry, and pull it off; it’ll take the spines with it. -If you enter the water and feel a strong pull, get out immediately. As soon as the water gets up to your chest, it’ll be practically impossible to break free. If you've still got caught by the current, stay calm, it won't pull you underwater. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 5364526 BRIGHT SIDE
Who Lives In the Deepest Place On Earth?
 
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Who lives at the bottom of the Mariana trench? Scientists have finally revealed the Mariana Trench mystery. Take a look at the deepest creature ever caught there! The curiosity of human nature makes people look for secrets and mysteries far away from home, like in outer space or on other planets. Scientists have mapped only 5 percent of our planet’s seafloor. And if you’ve ever considered the ocean plain and boring, the video you’re about to watch will blow your mind. TIMESTAMPS The Mariana Trench is the deepest area 0:45 The deepest-living fish in the world 2:40 “Ethereal snailfish” 3:12 A mysterious metallic sound 3:38 Deep sea cucumber 5:50 The deep sea anglerfish 6:20 The barreleye fish 7:13 The Champagne Vent 8:05 The 4-inch amoeba 8:35 SUMMARY The Mariana Trench is the deepest area you can find on Earth. Although almost everybody has heard the name, we have shockingly little data about this dark underwater place in the western Pacific Ocean. It’s a monumental task mapping the seafloor and taking pictures when the water pressure at the bottom is more than 1,000 times greater than that at the surface! The Mariana Trench houses the deepest parts of our planet. Music: The Cave of Poetry by Savfk (https://soundcloud.com/savfk) is licensed under a Creative Commons license (https://www.youtube.com/redirect?redir_token=qrG6R2YuSdRsl9d4Dssanp-563R8MTUyMjEzNzE4NkAxNTIyMDUwNzg2&event=video_description&v=2OX0n9RiI3g&q=https%3A%2F%2Fcreativecommons.org%2Flicenses%2Fby%2F4.0%2F). Savfk YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXlppUGWeGtHBp_1xKsawmQ Location of the Mariana Trench: By I, Kmusser, CC BY 2.5 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2502266 Cut-out from original shown below: By By Masaki Miya et al. - Evolutionary history of anglerfishes (Teleostei: Lophiiformes): a mitogenomic perspective. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2010, 10:58 doi:10.1186/1471-2148- 10-58, CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31419510 Pseudoliparis swirei (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae), hadal snailfish from the Mariana Trench: By Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. - Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. (2017). Pseudoliparis swirei sp. nov.: A newly-discovered hadal snailfish (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae) from the Mariana Trench. Zootaxa, 4358 (1):161—177. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4358.1.7, CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=64828839 Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/ Location of the Mariana Trench: By I, Kmusser, CC BY 2.5 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2502266 Deepest Depth in the Trench (Map view of the bathymetry of southern Mariana Trench area): By University of New Hampshire, http://ccom.unh.edu/theme/law-sea/mariana-trench-pacific-ocean/mariana-obliques Pseudoliparis swirei (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae), hadal snailfish from the Mariana Trench: By Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. - Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. (2017). Pseudoliparis swirei sp. nov.: A newly-discovered hadal snailfish (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae) from the Mariana Trench. Zootaxa, 4358 (1): 161—177. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4358.1.7, CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=64828839 Cut-out from original shown below: By By Masaki Miya et al. - Evolutionary history of anglerfishes (Teleostei: Lophiiformes): a mitogenomic perspective. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2010, 10:58 doi:10.1186/1471-2148-10-58, CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31419510 Deep-sea Holothurian: By NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas, http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/dailyupdates/media/video/0425-holo/0425-holo.html Researchers solve mystery of deep-sea fish with tubular eyes and transparent head (The barreleye (Macropinna microstoma): By Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), https://www.mbari.org/barreleye-fish-with-tubular-eyes-and-transparent-head
Views: 5048363 BRIGHT SIDE
If You See Square Waves In The Ocean Get Out Of The Water Immediately
 
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Views: 9854313 Facts Verse
Most Dangerous Beaches In The World
 
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You can now join Hulu starting at $5.99/ month! Click the link below to sign up! http://bit.ly/HuluVideo ---------------------------------------------------------- Click the link to subscribe: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FactsVerse Twitter: https://twitter.com/FactsVerse Instagram: https://instagram.com/factsverse/ For more videos and articles visit: http://factsverse.com Music: Kevin MacLeod Image Credits : Narrated by : Darren Marlar www.MarlarHouse.com *If you click the above link, we may earn a small affiliate commission
Views: 11764440 Facts Verse
Pluto Might Have a Liquid Water Ocean?! | SciShow News
 
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Pluto might seem like the least likely place to find liquid water, but thanks to New Horizons, we have new information about oceans on the dwarf planet and more from the outer reaches of the solar system! SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for helping us keep SciShow free for everyone forever: Adam Brainard, Greg, Alex Hackman, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Check out the playlist for season 2 of Origin of Everything! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLLfvwXL7G2Ih9TBgSyM1gD9D24HZHlg5T Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-019-0369-8 https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/hu-gic051719.php https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13000 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/new-evidence-strengthens-case-wet-ocean-beneath-plutos-surface-180959534/ http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/ask/155-How-cold-is-it-on-Pluto- https://science.sciencemag.org/content/364/6441/eaaw9771 https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/news/945/nasas-new-horizons-team-publishes-first-kuiper-belt-flyby-science-results/ https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-s-new-horizons-team-publishes-first-kuiper-belt-flyby-science-results IMAGES https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a013000/a013000/pluto-cryovolcano16x9_1024x576.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gashydrat_mit_Struktur.jpg#/media/File:Gashydrat_mit_Struktur.jpg https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/a-full-view-of-pluto-s-stunning-crescent
Views: 239596 SciShow Space
Did They Find a Living Megalodon In the Mariana Trench?
 
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Сould Megalodon sharks still be alive in the deepest parts of the ocean? Science tells us that Megalodon sharks are extinct. Given that it was a massive shark with noticeable feeding habits, we guess that if Megalodon sharks were still roaming the oceans, they would probably have been spotted by someone by now. But perhaps not if they lived in the deepest place on Earth: the Mariana Trench. TIMESTAMPS: What the name Megalodon means 1:49 Megalodon’s size 3:26 The deepest spot on Earth 4:13 Could Megalodon live in the Mariana Trench 5:00 How many people reached Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench 6:39 #megalodon #marianatrench #meg Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY: - The Megalodon shark roamed the oceans as early as 23 million years ago, and we have their fossils to prove their existence. When people first encountered Megalodon teeth, they believed them to be rocks that had made their way to Earth from the moon. - Megalodon was the biggest shark to terrorize the ocean, and it is thought to have gone extinct 2.6 million years ago. The name Megalodon means “big tooth.” Most of the recovered Megalodon fossil teeth have been 4” to 5”. But there are a few enormous teeth that are over 7”. - The Mariana Trench is 6.83 miles deep and measures more than 1,500 miles long and 43 miles wide. To put the depth into perspective, if you were to put Mount Everest into the Mariana Trench, the top would still be sticking out. To put the length into perspective, in 1,500 miles you could fit all the states between Florida and Massachusetts. 1,500 miles is also the distance between Madrid, in Spain, and Copenhagen, in Denmark. - To survive in the Mariana Trench, Megalodon would have had to adapt to the living conditions and evolve. It would also have to switch its diet from whales, dolphins, sea lions, and sea cows to whatever organisms reside in the Mariana Trench and hope that it could find and eat its usual 2,500 lb of food per day. - According to the United Nations, there are 7.6 billion people in the world today, and only 3 of them have made it to the deepest point on Earth. The reality is that with so little research, it is impossible to know what lies in the depths of the Mariana Trench. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 22701451 BRIGHT SIDE
20 Terrifying Things Found Deep Underwater
 
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The ocean is a deep, dark, and mysterious place. We might think we know a lot about it, but in fact only about five percent of the ocean's seafloor has been mapped. You won't believe what we actually found in the deep sea! Interested? You can also check out other amazing stories about our world and subscribe to the channel! ► http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-Richest ◄ Like Mysterious Rooms You Should Never Visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a40nuYaG9Us Or 20 Terrifying Facts About The Deep Web - Why It Isn’t Safe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZM3aRw0Wf8 When you take into consideration that the ocean occupies around 70 percent of the earth's surface, that leaves a huge 65 percent of the world that we're still unsure about. More men have stepped on the surface of the moon than have dived into the depths of the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean. But luckily, most of our experiences with the ocean are positive ones. We can swim in the sea, wander across the shore, or sunbathe on the beach and watch the waves lap against the sand. Or, we can take exploratory trips into the water to look for special animals, we can use jet skis and speedboats to make the most of the water's free spirit, or we can simply go for a relaxing paddle. But there's a darker side to the ocean that we try not to think about. The further down into the water you go, the less we know about what to expect down there. With conditions unlike anywhere else on earth, only the toughest creatures can survive. Some of them are harmless, but some of them are dangerous. Scientists have dedicated years of research into discovering this previously-unknown portion of the world but not all of it has been successful. But some of what they have found over the years has forced them to think twice about everything we know. Before you start thinking that these experts are just lazy, you need to take into account just how severely different the pressure and atmosphere is once you're below sea level. Surroundings can be incredibly dangerous so only the bravest venture down into the unknown. For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Our Social Media: Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheRichest.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRichest_Com Instagram: http://instagram.com/therichest For more videos and articles visit: http://therichest.com/
Views: 465655 TheRichest
10 Strangest Ocean Phenomena You Won't Believe!
 
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Top 10 Amazing things that occur in the deep blue ocean. Creatures, and strange underwater events! Subscribe to our channel: http://goo.gl/9CwQhg For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Description: With water covering 70% of the Earth’s surface, it’s no wonder that oceans yield spectacular species, with scientists finding up to four new species a day, according to the World Register of Marine Species, or WoRMS. They add that there are also approximately 228,450 marine species known to scientists with some two million more multi-celled marine organisms still to be discovered. The ocean is also home to other phenomena including giant beached whales, bioluminescence – when water appears to be glowing - and the yearly migration of millions of red sea crabs on Christmas Island, stopping drivers and pedestrians in their tracks. Seahorses continue to fascinate people time and again, not only for their combination of a norse-like head with S-shaped bodies but also because of what’s seemingly a reversal of roles in the natural world i.e. the male having to do the “pushing.” Rogue waves are an amazing phenomena that could have deadly consequences too, engulfing ships and fishermen in its wake. Short-tail stingrays are also considered to be dangerous. The death of Australian wildlife expert Steve Irwin, “The Crocodile Hunter,” by a sting ray brought the species to prominence in 2006 but in reality, that was a freak occurrence that happens on extremely rare occasions. Sea pens and glass squid appear to go hand in hand, although neither are what they seem. Underwater, famed French marine explorer Jacque Costeau once said “When one man, for whatever reason, has the opportunity to lead an extraordinary life, he has no right to keep it to himself.” Such is the inspiration by marine biologists, sailors, and regular people alike to continue to explore life under water. Despite man’s advancements of NASA and seeking life on other planets, it’s seeing what’s under the earth’s surface where marine life will help us truly understand our human world. Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheRichest.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRichest_Com Instagram: http://instagram.com/therichest Featuring: Seahorses Giant Beached Whales Bioluminescence Rogue Waves Christmas Island’s red crab migration Pyrosome Underwater crop circles Sea Pens Short-Tail Stingray Glass Squid For more videos and articles visit: http://www.therichest.com/ TheRichest is the world's leading source of shocking and intriguing content surrounding celebrities, money, global events, society, pop culture, sports and much more. We create high quality top 10 and top 5 list based videos filled with mind blowing interesting and entertaining facts you are going to love and enjoy. Currently updating every day!
Views: 17440987 TheRichest
HOW DEEP IS OCEAN (HINDI) | समुन्द्र में कौन रहता है ??
 
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NAMASKAAR DOSTO, KAISE HAIN AAP LOG. THIS VIDEO IS ABOUT UNSEEN AND UNEXPLORED DEEP SEA. HAVE ADVENTURE. MOTIVATE US BY SUBSCRIBING OUR CHANNEL AND PRESS BELL ICON FOR OUR REGULAR VIDEOS. THANKYOU, BE HEALTY BE MOTIVATED. JAI HIND, STAY CONNECTED. This video was created with the single purpose to motivate people.For any query regarding contents, plz e-mail us at [email protected] Music Source: Divider by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/divider/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/ "SOME IMAGES ARE USED AS ILLUSTRATIONS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE UNDER FAIR USE - All images and videos used are in Public Domain" INFO SOURCE : https://www.good.is/articles/deep-ocean-video 1)This video has no negative impact on the original works (It would actually be positive for them) 2)This video is also for teaching purposes. 3)It is not transformative in nature. 4)I only used bits and pieces of videos to get the point across where necessary. Disclaimer- Some contents are used for educational purpose under fair use. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit,educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
Views: 3370180 THE AMAZING INFO
A New Continent Is Discovered on Earth In the Pacific Ocean
 
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How to Stop Water Polution. In case you're wondering what water polution has to do with a new continent discoevered in the Pacific Ocean, here's the answer to this mystery. This new continent is an island that consists solely of garbage and plastic waste. Some countries are ready to announce an ecological disaster. Let’s see if there’s something we can all do to save the planet. TIMESTAMPS The popularity of plastic 0:26 Garbage islands 1:47 The Great Pacific Garbage Patch 2:30 Problems connected with the plastic pollution of the ocean 4:39 Bali ecological disaster 7:31 Several ways to solve problem 8:26 #newcontinent #garbageisland #ecologicalproblem Music: Butchers - Silent Partner https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -2 million plastic bags a minute are thrown away. As for bubble wrap, the amount produced in just one year would be enough to cover our planet around the equator. 500 billion plastic cups are used and disposed of annually. -There are 3 huge garbage islands in the world: in the central North Pacific Ocean, in the Indian Ocean, and in the Atlantic Ocean. -The size of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is currently more than 600,000 square miles. According to the journal Scientific Reports, there are more than 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic that have accumulated in this area. -Plastic objects in the ocean kill animals or get stuck in their bodies. Some types of plastic are toxic. In addition, plastic has the ability to absorb such poisonous substances as mercury. Birds often choke to death after trying to swallow a bright object that has caught their eye. -Indonesian authorities have recently declared a “garbage emergency.” More than 100 tons of waste brought ashore every day to beaches from Seminyak and Jimbaran to Kuta. -To solve the problem, people can find a way to remove the garbage that is already in the ocean. Another way out is to decrease pollution or stop it completely. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2791707 BRIGHT SIDE
How To Save Our Seas From Plastic Pollution
 
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Plastic pollution poses one of the biggest threats to our seas, so lets look at some of the causes, effects and solutions to making our oceans plastic free! Subscribe for more: http://bit.ly/SubscribeBloom Go plastic free! http://noplasticshop.co.uk SOURCES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6xlNyWPpB8 http://bigthink.com/philip-perry/sea-creatures-in-the-oceans-deepest-trench-have-plastic-inside-their-stomachs https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/29/if-you-drop-plastic-in-the-ocean-where-does-it-end-up https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/18/uk-considers-tax-on-single-use-plastics-to-tackle-ocean-pollution https://www.newsdeeply.com/oceans/articles/2017/11/21/deeply-talks-why-plastic-straws-are-key-to-fighting-ocean-pollution https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/plastic-produced-recycling-waste-ocean-trash-debris-environment/ https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jan/19/more-plastic-than-fish-in-the-sea-by-2050-warns-ellen-macarthur ✉ LET'S CHAT Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/_bloomofficial Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/_bloomofficial Created by: Libby Masters and Brogan O'Grady Written by: Libby Masters Illustrated/Animated by: Brogan O'Grady Produced by: Libby Masters and Brogan O'Grady Edited by: Brogan O'Grady
Views: 13572 Bloom
Who Lives at the Bottom of the Bermuda Triangle?
 
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There is one special place that simultaneously terrifies and has unexplainable pull: 300 ships gone missing, 75 aircrafts never found; you're right, that's all about the Bermuda Triangle. Few people are aware of what the life is like at the bottom of the Bermuda Triangle – are you ready to meet the most shocking and scary creatures ever? Dragonfish live at the staggering depth of 5 to 7 thousand feet. This fish looks quite terrifying, with its black coloring and the light it produces on its own. Unlike other deep-water inhabitants, dragonfish produces light in the infrared range while the blue and green range is what other fish stick to. Vampire Squid has the largest eyes in terms of proportions in the world and is born to live in the depth. These animals are also covered with photophores which distract predators and lure prey. The mouth of the gulper eel is loosely hinged which makes it extremely wide and big. In fact, the length of the jaw of the eel reaches one-fourth of the length of their body. Despite being the owner of an enormous mouth, the gulper eel has tiny teeth, and this means that it isn't supposed to prey on large animals. The Goblin Shark reaches 13 ft in size and is also called the Vampire Shark due to the fact that it avoids light at all cost. Due to this feature, you can see the shark in its natural habitat only if you go as deep as 890 to 4300 ft. Pharynx, a complex feeding apparatus that helps Eunice Aphroditois catch the prey, can turn inside out, not unlike glove fingers. It has strong and extremely sharp mandibles which can easily cut the prey in half due to the strength and speed of the worm's attack. These are just some of the creatures that lurk in the depth of the Bermuda Triangle. Who knows what other unbelievable horror-movie beasts we can meet there? Music: Action Hero - Jingle Punks https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music Animation is created by Bright Side. Goblin Shark (Mitsukurina owstoni) at Natural History Museum in Vienna: By Peter Halasz, CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1659164, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Goblin_shark,_Pengo.jpg#/media/File:Goblin_shark,_Pengo.jpg Head of a goblin shark (Mitsukurina owstoni) with jaws extended: By Dianne Bray / Museum Victoria, CC BY 3.0 au https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/deed.en, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mistukurina_owstoni_museum_victoria_-_head_detail.jpg#/media/File:Mistukurina_owstoni_museum_victoria_-_head_detail.jpg TIMESTAMPS Bermuda Triangle mystery 0:50 Dragonfish 2:53 Vampire Squid 3:41 Gulper Eel 4:28 Goblin Shark 5:45 Eunice Aphroditois 7:03 SUMMARY -The most well-known example of ships disappearing in that area was the USS Cyclops, an American iron-clad steamer with 309 crew members on board. Nobody knows for sure what makes crafts disappear in this area. -Dragonfish looks quite terrifying, with its black coloring and the light it produces on its own in case of danger. -The Vampire Squid has is bright red eyes and crimson cloak that looks like webbing. In case of a threat, these creatures can invert their skin exposing their spines. -The pouch-like structure of the lower jaw allows the eel to deposit its prey there. Even the stomach of the eel can stretch so much that the creature can hold there a huge amount of food. -The Goblin Shark reaches 13 ft in size and is also called the Vampire Shark due to the fact that it avoids light at all cost. As soon as the prey appears in the vicinity, the jaw of the shark will elongate and grab it. -The worm buries itself in the seafloor with just a fraction of its body exposed. It has five antennae it uses to sense the prey. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 12236578 BRIGHT SIDE
What if the Mediterranean was Drained? (Atlantropa) | Hearts of Iron 4 [HOI4]
 
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What if the Mediterranean Sea was Drained? Atlantropa, also referred to as Panropa, was a gigantic engineering and colonization idea devised by a German architect in the 1920s. Its central feature was a hydroelectric dam to be built across the Strait of Gibraltar. How will this effect the world in 1936? Atlantropa Mod on Steam: https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1403760948&searchtext=Atlantropa Become a Supporter ► https://www.patreon.com/drewdurnil Patreon Super Supporters: Furry Cruz, Kaitlyn Liu, Nathaniel H, Maxy G, Tyler, Matthew Rembish, KMT for China, Sisterfister, Leather Daddy Lenin, Franco is T H I C C, SwissAargau, Shawn Spellman, Jake Paul is my Daddy, King Salman, William Bennett, Jens the Luvdisc, Ruserification, Mathew Ellis, Elijah Senpai, kirby, Whion, Elphie C, Jeff, Damien P, Astrakonix, Lauri K, TheUnusualArt, Matthew Bourgeois, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - What HOI4 Mod is This? Hearts of Iron 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUhPoLwtsAg&list=UUPcABVoFfCK5gDfX0PY1KGg All Nations an Industrial Power! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuAbGeRHvFY&list=UUPcABVoFfCK5gDfX0PY1KGg - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - SOCIAL MEDIA Twitter ► https://twitter.com/drewdurnil Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/drewdurnil/ About Hearts of Iron 4 - Waking the Tiger: Years before Europe went to war, Japan’s imperial ambitions targeted the divided Chinese Republic. Crippled by government paralysis and centuries of fitful development, China is still not a pushover. With vast reserves of manpower and resources, not to mention a giant landmass, can the Republic of China and its temporary ally withstand Japan?
Views: 555997 Drew Durnil
A New Bermuda Triangle Theory Explains Its Mystery
 
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The Bermuda Triangle is one of the biggest mysteries in the world. This region, shaped in the form of a triangle, is situated in the North Atlantic Ocean between Miami, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda. More than 150 planes, cargo ships, and smaller vessels have met their demise in this cursed area. Even with modern technology and communication systems, vessels still keep vanishing. The latest discovery may shed a different light on the eternal enigma. #bermudatriangle #brightside TIMESTAMPS: The most recent accident 1:45 The methane gas theory 5:12 Wormholes theory 5:44 Waterspouts theory 6:06 A hole in the electromagnetic forces of the planet 6:27 The human error theory 6:47 The alien theory 7:11 Enormous rogue waves 7:49 Holes in the sea 10:05 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY: - The most recent accident was also the most disastrous for the last 30 years, and it happened on October 1, 2015. That day, the huge cargo ship SS El Faro went missing in the area of the Bermuda Triangle. The search continued for weeks, and SS El Faro was finally spotted. It was positioned upright and in one piece at a depth of 15,000 ft in the Atlantic. The search party found no trace of the crew. - Some researchers believe that ships and planes crash and disappear in the area due to methane gas. And it has indeed been proved that there are massive stores of this gas in some areas of the ocean floor. Therefore, when gas is released into the water, the process can sink ships and make planes crash. - The wormholes theory is preferred by those who love sci-fi. In short, a wormhole is a space-time shortcut. While the existence of wormholes hasn't been proven yet, this doesn't stop some people from believing that this phenomenon is what causes vanishings in the Bermuda Triangle. - Waterspouts (more simply, tornados at sea) are said to have been spotted in the Bermuda Triangle. This weather phenomenon sucks water many feet up into the air. Potentially, this can make a ship disappear with eerie ease. - Compasses are reported to malfunction in the Bermuda Triangle. This place is one of the few on Earth where compasses have problems pointing north. This can lead to sailors and pilots going off their course. - The human error theory sounds rather disappointing for those who love mysteries! However, some people are sure that all the crashes and disappearances in the Bermuda Triangle happen due to people's mistakes. There are too many confusing islands that are hard to distinguish from one another as well as the difficult weather condition. - No mystery can exist without an explanation of alien interference. It's just too convenient to blame disappearances on extraterrestrial forces. Though why aliens would choose exactly this area for their abductions remains unknown. - The most recent findings of scientists allow them to claim that the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle has finally been solved. The culprits are huge sea monsters! But when we say “monsters,” we do not mean living creatures. They are enormous rogue waves that were believed to be a myth. Rogue waves are terrifying and anomalous. They are massive walls of water that move across the ocean. Rogue waves can have a force of 9 metric tons per square foot. To compare, the average 40-ft-high wave has a force of only 0.5 metric tons per square foot. Subscribe to Bright Side: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1768749 BRIGHT SIDE
The Bermuda Triangle Mystery Has Been Solved
 
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Scientists May Have Finally Cracked the Greatest Mystery Behind the Bermuda Triangle. How many creepy stories about the disappearing of airplanes and ships in the Bermuda Triangle have you heard? We guess many. It is a large area in the Atlantic Ocean between Florida, Puerto Rico, and Bermuda. This region is notorious for its mysterious phenomena. Huge amounts of ships and planes have disappeared here. Its second name is ‘The devil’s triangle.' All those mythical vanishings happened under unknown and unexplained circumstances. Some of the planes and ships have never been found. There have been many theories about why it all occurs in that area starting from waterspouts to aliens and even sea monsters. But those were only theories... TIMESTAMPS Where is the Bermuda Triangle? 0:22 Theories 0:47 A big incident in 2005 1:40 Stories behind the Bermuda triangle 2:50 The main mystery solved 3:08 SUMMARY - In 1945 five American torpedo bombers and a plane that was sent out to find them vanished without a trace. - 75 aircraft and several hundred ships have been lost. - The latest tragedy happened in 2015 when the cargo ship "El Faro" disappeared in this region. - In 2005 the first Piper-PA airplane disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle. - In 2007 one more Piper-PA airplane disappeared near Berry Island. Many stories are whirling around this area. But now, finally, the mystery behind the Bermuda Triangle, might have been solved. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 23564103 BRIGHT SIDE
A Man Spent a Year Adrift In the Middle of the Ocean
 
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You ever looked out at the open sea and thought, “What if I got swept away out there? What would happen to me?” Well, luckily for most of us, this is an unlikely scenario for a typical beach-goer. But this nightmare can come true if you're a fisherman and something has gone terribly wrong on your trip. That's exactly what happened to one man who spent over a year alone out in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. His boat had neither a cabin nor any roof. And he even didn't have an anchor since he supposed that the trip wasn't going to take that long... #survivalstory #truestory #JoséSalvadorAlvarenga Other videos you might like: 12 Life Hacks That Can Help You Survive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOjWDMoxf1U& The Only Way to Survive In a Sinking Car https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmrOWRx5xU8& 7 Swimming Rules That Will Save Your Life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DBOHTY4zus& TIMESTAMPS: What was the man’s plan 0:40 Why he wasn't able to get to the shore 2:55 What do you know about the Pacific? 4:57 What was the worst thing 6:13 How the man got home 7:42 Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - On November 17, 2012, 37-year-old José Salvador Alvarenga headed out on his fishing trip. His plan was pretty ambitious: he was going to spend 30 hours in the open ocean. - This trip was gonna be dangerous, and, naturally, the man couldn't hit the water without a second pair of hands. He found a 22-year-old volunteer who agreed step in to. - Alvarenga knew that a storm was rapidly approaching the area, but nothing could stop the fishermen from starting the journey. One good catch would be a week’s-worth of salary. - That’s when the heavy rain started – the storm had reached the men. Alvarenga had to take drastic measures. He dumped all the fish and several thousand dollars-worth of equipment into the ocean. - Several vessels and aircraft started a search-and-rescue operation that lasted for two days. But the weather was gradually getting worse, and it eventually became impossible to keep searching. - Alvarenga and his fishing partner were left on their own. And 5 days later, when the winds had died down a bit, they were 280 miles away from the shore, out in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, with nothing but blue water all around them. - During their voyage, they fed themselves on raw fish and turtles that they’d caught with their bare hands. They also grabbed birds that were unlucky enough to land on the boat. - But they were getting weak, especially Alvarenga’s fishing partner. Tragically, he did fall ill and wasn’t able to survive. - The fisherman spent months adrift in the ocean. The boat kept going until one day he saw land! It was a small island, Tile Islet, that was part of the Marshall Islands. - It turned out that Alvarenga had traveled almost 7,000 miles before he got to the shore. And he was fortunate to come across the island. - After 11 days of rest and recuperation, the rescued fisherman had recovered enough to fly home to El Salvador. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Photos: https://www.depositphotos.com East News ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 158685 BRIGHT SIDE
Ocean Mysteries That Science Can’t Explain
 
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The ocean is a very mysterious place... Description: The ocean is large, vast and mostly unexplored. Sure, we can tell you everything there is to know about the surface of the ocean but there’s so much we haven’t been able to explore yet because our current technology only allows us to go so deep into the ocean. Who knows what mysteries and what horrors lie for us waiting underneath. In today’s video, we’ll count down some of the top ocean mysteries that science can’t explain. 10. Milky Sea 9. Bioluminescence 8. Seas Clashing 7. Black Sea Steam 6. Green Flashes 5. Baltic Sea 4. Red Tide 3.??? 2. ?? 1. ? ► SUBSCRIBE TO AMERIKANO!: https://goo.gl/e8mcCy ► VISIT OUR SITE FOR THE BEST ARTICLES!: www.thefinestpost.com ► For copyright matters please contact us: [email protected] ► WORK FOR TOP 5S FINEST: https://goo.gl/Su8DZQ ► FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: https://twitter.com/Top5sFinest ► LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/TheFinestPost/ Background Music: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Thank you so much for watching! Smash that like button for more, make sure you share the video with your friends and dont forget to subscribe!
Views: 25702 The Finest
Why The Ocean Can’t Fix The Drought
 
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California’s drought is bad. Really bad. If we could take salt out of ocean water, could that fix the problem? Follow Julian on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jhug00 Read More: Desalination out of Desperation http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/533446/desalination-out-of-desperation/ “Even in drought-stricken California, San Diego stands out. It gets less rain than parched Los Angeles or Fresno.” Thirsty West: Why California Will Soon Be Drinking Their Own Pee http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2014/06/desalination_vs_purification_why_californians_will_soon_drink_their_own.html “California has a lot of coastline. So why all the fuss about the drought? Desalination to the rescue, right?” USGS estimates vast amounts of water used in California http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2014/08/21/usgs-estimates-vast-amounts-water-used-california/14400333/ “How much water does California use each year?” ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Julia Wilde on Twitter https://twitter.com/julia_sci DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 246322 Seeker
Could Megalodon Sharks Still Live In the Ocean?
 
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Does Megalodon still exist? For over 10 million years, this toothy huge creature ruled the world’s waters. Just imagine, the largest Megalodon tooth ever found is almost 3 times larger than the teeth you’ll find in the great white sharks of today! Theories out there argue that these bad boys of the ocean are still around. But there’s no doubt they’re long gone and extinct. Despite blockbuster hit movies like 2018’s The Meg and conspiracy theories running rampant on the Internet, these prehistoric sea beasts no longer exist. Still don’t believe it? Just get ready for a big dose of scientific evidence! Other videos you might like: 10 Extinct Creatures That Could Have Ruined The World https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNBTGhzKOo0& 10 Most Dangerous and Scariest Waters In the World https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ip8OUwPj3_E 10 Unique Animals You Won’t Believe Exist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8mxT7lnCuo& TIMESTAMPS: When Megalodon went extinct 1:04 Why it happened 2:10 Who was the Megalodon’s biggest competitor 3:55 Who else was the Megalodon’s enemy 4:58 Why whales were starting to disappear 5:33 What if the Megalodon continued to thrive? 7:19 Can the great white become as large as the Megalodon? 8:18 #megalodon #sharks #prehistoricanimals Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - About 2.6 million years ago marked the beginning of the era known as the Pleistocene. At the beginning of this era, temperatures began to cool and glaciers started to form all over. - While there’s no doubt that the Megalodon definitely went extinct, it probably wasn’t because they couldn’t keep up with whales in the cooler temperatures. - Though the Megalodon were ferocious and scary, there were actually other flesh-hungry predators sharing the ocean that liked to eat a lot of the same things that these giant sharks did. - One of the Megalodon’s biggest competitors in the deep blue during the mid-Miocene era was the now extinct genus of sperm whale known as the Livyatan Melvillei. - By the end of the Miocene, the Carcharodon Hubbelli wasn’t afraid to go head-to-head with the mighty Megalodon when it came to hunting for prey. - As time moved forward into the Pliocene era, whales were starting to disappear. While there were about 60 different whale species in the previous Miocene age, only 40 remained by the time of the Pliocene. - At this time, the Megalodon had to put their game faces on and fight even harder against the great white sharks who were smaller and faster. - Today’s marine life would be a little different if the Megalodon was still around. For one thing, we may not have the massive whale species we’ve come to know, like the Blue Whale. - While today’s great white sharks aren’t even close to being as big as the Megalodon, they seem to be following in its fin-steps. The great white grows about 3 feet larger than its ancestors that swam alongside the Megalodon during the Pliocene. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Photos: https://www.depositphotos.com East News ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 278401 BRIGHT SIDE
25 Terrifying Sea Creatures That Actually Exist
 
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Click the link to subscribe: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/FactsVerse Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FactsVerse Twitter: https://twitter.com/FactsVerse Instagram: https://instagram.com/factsverse/ For more videos and articles visit: http://factsverse.com Music: Kevin MacLeod Narrated by : Darren Marlar www.MarlarHouse.com *If you click the above link, we may earn a small affiliate commission
Views: 4017724 Facts Verse
Ocean | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocean 00:03:45 1 Etymology 00:04:39 2 Earth's global ocean 00:04:49 2.1 Oceanic divisions 00:05:42 2.2 Global system 00:06:16 2.3 Physical properties 00:08:38 2.4 Oceanic zones 00:13:20 2.5 Exploration 00:14:14 2.6 Oceanic maritime currents 00:16:36 2.7 Climate 00:18:17 2.8 Biology 00:21:12 2.9 Gases 00:21:21 2.10 Surface 00:21:30 2.11 Mixing time 00:21:39 2.12 Salinity 00:23:18 2.13 Absorption of light 00:23:27 2.14 Economic value 00:23:54 2.15 Waves and swell 00:24:21 3 Extraterrestrial oceans 00:24:46 3.1 Planets 00:26:09 3.2 Natural satellites 00:27:44 3.3 Dwarf planets and trans-Neptunian objects 00:28:27 3.4 Extrasolar 00:30:40 3.5 Non-water surface liquids Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8487722754095425 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An ocean (from Ancient Greek Ὠκεανός, transc. Okeanós) is a body of water that composes much of a planet's hydrosphere. On Earth, an ocean is one of the major conventional divisions of the World Ocean. These are, in descending order by area, the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern (Antarctic), and Arctic Oceans. The word "ocean" is often used interchangeably with "sea" in American English. Strictly speaking, a sea is a body of water (generally a division of the world ocean) partly or fully enclosed by land, though "the sea" refers also to the oceans. Saline water covers approximately 361,000,000 km2 (139,000,000 sq mi) and is customarily divided into several principal oceans and smaller seas, with the ocean covering approximately 71% of Earth's surface and 90% of the Earth's biosphere. The ocean contains 97% of Earth's water, and oceanographers have stated that less than 5% of the World Ocean has been explored. The total volume is approximately 1.35 billion cubic kilometers (320 million cu mi) with an average depth of nearly 3,700 meters (12,100 ft).As the world ocean is the principal component of Earth's hydrosphere, it is integral to life, forms part of the carbon cycle, and influences climate and weather patterns. The World Ocean is the habitat of 230,000 known species, but because much of it is unexplored, the number of species that exist in the ocean is much larger, possibly over two million. The origin of Earth's oceans is unknown; oceans are thought to have formed in the Hadean eon and may have been the impetus for the emergence of life. Extraterrestrial oceans may be composed of water or other elements and compounds. The only confirmed large stable bodies of extraterrestrial surface liquids are the lakes of Titan, although there is evidence for the existence of oceans elsewhere in the Solar System. Early in their geologic histories, Mars and Venus are theorized to have had large water oceans. The Mars ocean hypothesis suggests that nearly a third of the surface of Mars was once covered by water, and a runaway greenhouse effect may have boiled away the global ocean of Venus. Compounds such as salts and ammonia dissolved in water lower its freezing point so that water might exist in large quantities in extraterrestrial environments as brine or convecting ice. Unconfirmed oceans are speculated beneath the surface of many dwarf planets and natural satellites; notably, the ocean of Europa is estimated to have over twice the water volume of Earth. The Solar System's giant planets are also thought to have liquid atmospheric layers of yet to be confirmed compositions. Oceans may also exist on exoplanets and exomoons, including surface oceans of liquid water within a circumstellar habitable zone. Ocean planets are a hypothetical type of planet with a surface completely covered with liquid.
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
How We Can Keep Plastics Out of Our Ocean | National Geographic
 
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Plastic pollution poses one of the biggest known threats to the ocean, influencing all ecosystems from beautiful coral reefs to abyssal trenches, eventually accumulating in our own food. Learn more about how to upend the current system of produce-use-discard, and transition to a system which promotes reuse and repurposing of plastics. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe Learn more about Pristine Seas and National Geographic Society's other work to explore and protect the planet: http://nationalgeographic.org/ http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/explore/pristine-seas/ About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta How We Can Keep Plastics Out of Our Ocean | National Geographic https://youtu.be/HQTUWK7CM-Y National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 1244762 National Geographic
Atlantic Ocean | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Atlantic Ocean Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest of the world's oceans, with an area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles). It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Europe and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean in the southwest, the Indian Ocean in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica). The Equatorial Counter Current subdivides it into the North Atlantic Ocean and the South Atlantic Ocean at about 8°N.Scientific explorations of the Atlantic include the Challenger expedition, the German Meteor expedition, Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the United States Navy Hydrographic Office.
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
10 Biggest Sea Creatures Ever Caught
 
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You won't believe that fishermen actually caught these gigantic sea monsters! Subscribe to our channel: http://goo.gl/9CwQhg SyFy recently aired the third film in their so-bad-its-good “Sharknado” series, prompting some to wonder if airborne, tornado-based sharks could actually be real. Okay, so no one is really wondering that. Still, though, the ocean continues to represent a great unknown to us, providing home to countless species, many of which remain a mystery to humanity. The more we learn about what lurks deep below the surface, the more we realize still remains uncovered. With two-thirds of the Earth’s surface covered in water, it stands to reason that a great deal of that space remains unexplored. Of course, just because humankind hasn’t covered every iota of ground along the ocean floor, it doesn’t mean that those areas are uninhabited. All we know for sure is that the truly deepest depths of the world’s oceans continue to offer surprises, even as scientific technology becomes increasingly advanced. New species unlike any others known before are routinely discovered, with entirely new and alien biomes in extreme environments that no life had even been thought possible have challenged our very notions of what life is and how it has evolved. Amidst the cold darkness of a low-lying ocean area with depths that no sunlight can penetrate lies an alien world of incredibly rare and mysterious species. While many are simple, harmless omnivores, they share the ocean floor with some pretty unsettling forces. These ocean-based creatures – those that we know about, anyway – change everything we think we know about fish. Each one has at least one predominant feature that stands out as being unlike anything seen before. Think you know sharks? Well, how about one with a saw-like nose or a frilly, eel-like body. Think you’ve seen some big fish? How about a 17-metre long swimmer or a 900-pound squid or even a 5,000-pound behemoth sunfish? Lurking within the ocean are a number of deadly, threatening, vicious creatures that are naturally designed and programmed to hunt and stalk their prey. Thankfully, most of these monsters live at pressures that humans could never survive at – not that they would survive long down there, anyway. In recent years, Hollywood has sparked a fascination with zombies, aliens and other forces that exist beyond the realms of our planet and that are not steeped in reality. Despite that, some of the strangest and most terrifying creatures in the universe lie beneath the surface of bodies of water with which we are, at least partially, familiar. As we sit on a beach staring out at the natural beauty of the Pacific Ocean, we remain blissfully oblivious to all that lurks within. This list seeks to open the door to an entire world of deep sea activity, featuring a cast of creepy and spooky characters that few even know exist. These 10 fish, some of whom may seem to be borne out of your darkest nightmares, are all very real and may give you second thoughts the next time you foray into the ocean. And these are just the ones we know about… Check out these other awesome videos! 10 Shockingly Large Creatures That Actually Exist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9odlL5Ti3dc 10 Things That Will Happen When Humans Go Extinct https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ml_awEqbEE Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheRichest.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRichest_Com Instagram: http://instagram.com/therichest For more videos and articles visit: http://www.therichest.com/
Views: 19492649 TheRichest
If You Swim in Square Waves, Your Life Is in Danger!
 
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There are some waves that you really don’t ever want to encounter when you’re swimming in the ocean. Square waves look like a giant chess board over the ocean. It's pretty awesome but incredibly dangerous. Other videos you might like: 8 Places You Should Never Swim In (Even If You Want To) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YP6i5iXzLJI& 10 Popular Cities That Can Be Extremely Dangerous for Tourists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8EcRcJRwyo& 9 Places You Should Never Swim (Never Ever!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhrctVyD4JI TIMESTAMPS: Where you can see square waves 1:22 How they come to be 2:23 The perfect storm 3:48 Other dangerous bodies of water 5:46 The Boiling Lake 6:00 West End, Grand Bahama Island 7:03 The East and North Coasts of Barbados 7:48 Condado Beach 8:22 Preview photo credit: Cross swell. Photo taken from Phares des Baleines (Lighthouse of the Whales) on Île de Ré: By Michel Griffon - Own work, CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12598928 Animation is created by Bright Side. Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - If you look off the western coast of France, you’ll see the Isle of Rhe. The coolest part about it is what you see just beyond the shore: square waves. This strange wave pattern looks like a giant chess board over the ocean. - When two different swells coming from opposite directions meet, it’s known as a cross sea. This is what generates these square waves you see near the Isle of Rhe. - Because these two seas have totally different weather conditions, a unique pattern emerges when they collide. They create a riptide that’s stronger than your average wave - way stronger than what you’ve probably experienced at the beach with regular waves. - There have been a handful of cases where people got caught in the cross sea, but, thankfully and luckily, they managed to get out safely. - These square waves have become somewhat famous over time given that there’s really no other place in the world that boasts a cross sea like this one. - The Boiling Lake on the Island of Dominica is one body of water you’ll definitely want to stay away from. From high heat to strong gas emissions, there are plenty of reasons to stay out of The Boiling Lake. - You’ll probably want to steer clear of the town of West End on Grand Bahama Island. This deadly beach is known for being one of the most shark-infested beaches in the world. - While the south and west coasts of Barbados are ideal for swimming and snorkeling, the east and north beaches have incredibly strong tides that can be quite treacherous. - Condado Beach in Puerto Rico is a desirable destination in the city of San Juan. However, the beach’s mighty waves and powerful current make this a very dangerous place to go swimming. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Photos: https://www.depositphotos.com East News ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1763434 BRIGHT SIDE
Why don't the Atlantic and Pacific oceans mix | Gulf of Alaska where two oceans meet but do not mix
 
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Indian ocean meets Atlantic ocean. gulf of Alaska where two oceans meet but don't mix. Amazing Facts About Gulf Of Alaska Where 2 Oceans Meet But Dont Mix .gulf of alaska where two oceans meet gulf of alaska where two oceans meet underwater . These are gulf of alaska facts . So here is where two seas meet but don t mix . Well its not an indian ocean meets atlantic ocean video because it is gulf of alaska oceans meet video which contains . Atlantic ocean And pacific ocean meet at this point. Hope you will like the video thanks for watching and don't forget to subscribe and let me know any other video you want me to make in the comments Support me On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=20706350 Subscribe to our channel : https://goo.gl/qCiemj Join us on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Informii-786719934773878/ Follow us on Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/informii/ Follow us on twitter : https://twitter.com/informiii
Views: 2893010 informii
The Oceans of Enceladus May Harbor Lifeforms - IGN News
 
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Saturn's sixth-largest moon Enceladus is believed to the most habitable body ever discovered outside of Earth, according to new research published in the journal Nature. Read more here: http://www.ign.com/articles/2015/03/12/the-warm-oceans-of-ice-moon-enceladus-could-be-home-to-lifeforms Subscribe to the IGN News Channel here: http://www.youtube.com/user/IGNNews?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 40364 IGN
The Ocean on Enceladus is Really Big
 
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This week on SciShow Space News, Saturn’s moon Enceladus probably has a giant ocean covering the entire world. And the year-long mission to the International Space Station just hit its halfway point! Hosted by: Caitlin Hofmeister ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Justin Lentz, David Campos, Chris Peters, and Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/SciShow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0019103515003899 http://earthsky.org/space/global-ocean-on-saturn-moon-enceladus http://www.techtimes.com/articles/85664/20150918/long-lived-ocean-on-enceladus-hints-possibility-for-alien-life.htm http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150916-enceladus-global-ocean-search-for-extraterrestrial-life/ http://www.space.com/30559-saturn-moon-enceladus-has-ocean.html http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/cassini-confirms-a-global-ocean-on-saturn-s-moon-enceladus/ https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cassini-finds-global-ocean-in-saturns-moon-enceladus http://www.space.com/30541-one-year-space-mission-halfway-point.html Space Station Live: First 100 Days of the One Year Mission: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JYfnpGDgwk http://www.space.com/9052-months-long-missions-durable-astronaut-mind.html http://web.mit.edu/16.459/www/Palinkas.pdf http://www.space.com/28947-yearlong-space-missions-history.html
Views: 259783 SciShow Space
Can't-Miss Articles! Fracking, Starwater, Oceans | S0 News October 9, 2015
 
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Observing the Frontier Conference: Pittsburgh: https://www.eventjoy.com/e/suspicious0bservers Phoenix: https://www.eventjoy.com/e/otf www.Suspicious0bservers.org  www.SpaceWeatherNews.com www.MagneticReversal.org www.ObservatoryProject.com www.EarthChangesMedia.com Solar Alerts on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRealS0s Good Videos/Articles: The Sun is Going to Sleep: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7whL9jvdL5s Discussing Earthquakes with Kongpop: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThCUZtzfA1c Earth's Magnetic Reversal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIayxqk0Ees Top 6 Climate Change Problems: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ew05sRDAcU Pause on Pausing the Pause: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZH46p7MUlw Sun Series: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHSoxioQtwZcJj_9clLz7Bggso7qg2PDj STARWATER Article: http://wavechronicle.com/wave/?p=1151 S0 Notes on Solar Shutdown: http://www.suspicious0bservers.org/fotw-s0-notes-february-13-2014/ IPCC History: http://www.suspicious0bservers.org/selections-from-the-1st-ipcc-full-report-wg1/ Today's Featured Links: Coral Bleaching: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gI6UPqFkJ0k Pluto Water: http://www.nasa.gov/nh/nh-finds-blue-skies-and-water-ice-on-pluto Mars Water: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4734 Fracking and Birth: http://www.newswise.com/articles/study-fracking-industry-wells-associated-with-premature-birth Original music by NEMES1S WORLD WEATHER: Earth WindMap: http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/850hPa/orthographic=-345.32,51.43,481 Global Maps: http://www.atmos.albany.edu/student/kgriffin/maps/ NDBC Buoys: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/ HurricaneZone Satellite Images: http://www.hurricanezone.net/westpacific/animations.html NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory: http://www.nnvl.noaa.gov/Default.php Satellite Maps: http://www.woweather.com/cgi-app/satellite?LANG=us&CONT=namk Forecast Maps: http://www.woweather.com/weather/maps/forecastmaps?LANG=us&CONT=usus TORCON: http://www.weather.com/news/tornado-torcon-index [Tornado Forecast for the day] HURRICANE TRACKER: http://www.weather.com/weather/hurricanecentral/tracker GOES Satellites: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/goes/ THE US WINDMAP: http://hint.fm/wind/ Severe Weather Threats: http://www.weather.com/news/weather-severe/severe-weather-tracker Canada Weather Office Satellite Composites: http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/satellite/index_e.html Temperature Delta: http://www.intellicast.com/National/Temperature/Delta.aspx Records/Extremes: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/extremes/records/ SOHO Solar Wind: http://umtof.umd.edu/pm/ Planetary Orbital Diagram - Ceres1 JPL: http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=ceres;orb=1;cov=0;log=0;cad=0#orb SDO: http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ Helioviewer: http://www.helioviewer.org/ SOHO: http://sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/soho_movie_theater Stereo: http://stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/images iSWA: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov/iswa/iSWA.html NASA ENLIL SPIRAL: http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/iSWACygnetStreamer?timestamp=2038-01-23+00%3A44%3A00&window=-1&cygnetId=261 Gamma Ray Bursts: http://grb.sonoma.edu/ BARTOL Cosmic Rays: http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu//spaceweather/welcome.html ISWA: http://iswa.ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov:8080/IswaSystemWebApp/ GONG: http://gong2.nso.edu/dailyimages/ GONG Magnetic Maps: http://gong.nso.edu/data/magmap/ondemand.html MISC Links: JAPAN Radiation Map: http://jciv.iidj.net/map/ RADIATION Network: http://radiationnetwork.com/ LISS: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php QUAKES LIST FULL: http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/seismologist.php RSOE: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php [That cool alert map I use] Moon: http://www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/pacalc.html
Views: 34939 Suspicious0bservers
Ocean Climate Change
 
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A big thanks to all current and future patrons who are helping fund this science and filmmaking outreach via Patreon: http://bit.ly/2Sfmkph Don’t forget to follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/untamedscience/ The oceans are changing, and few know where they'll be in 100 years. Our hope is that they'll be better than they are now. We've constructed a list of the top ways we can help save the oceans. http://www.untamedscience.com/biology/ecology/ecology-articles/10-ways-to-save-the-ocean/ Watch the Full Interview with the producer of this piece here: http://www.untamedscience.com/biodiversity/article/ways-save-ocean If you want 52 Things to start on right now to improve your filmmaking and photography - we have videos on them all here: http://www.untamedscience.com/blog/52things/ Our GEAR ------------ Main DSLR : https://amzn.to/2Sho2qc Second Camera : http://amzn.to/2B9HInR Main Lens - http://amzn.to/2BaEXTk The Adventure Camera Bag : http://amzn.to/2B8WYRH The Macro Lens - http://amzn.to/2hHUhxW Telephoto Lens - http://amzn.to/2za1FJV Our Mega Wide Lens - http://amzn.to/2z9KtnS Our BEST On-camera Mic - http://amzn.to/2hGuSVt The Drone - http://amzn.to/2z84Bqc My Moving Timelapse setup - https://amzn.to/2SeCZcJ GoPro HERO 7 - https://amzn.to/2ShoPHG Our Filmmaking Book!!! - http://amzn.to/2zV88LS Our Music: https://goo.gl/roSjb7 The full video setup: https://kit.com/UntamedScience (By buying through these links you help us support the channel) On Social -------------- Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/untamedscience/ (Jonas @behindthescience) Twitter: https://twitter.com/untamedscience Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/untamedscience Website: http://www.untamedscience.com YouTube: http://bit.ly/2EDk6vO (for most of my work) Jonas and I are creating a whole series of how-to-filmmaking videos to get you started. Here is the first video: http://bit.ly/2AcYvHJ and our book: http://amzn.to/2zV88LS My main science YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/2EDk6vO Help us create amazing, world reaching content by translating and transcribing videos on our channel: http://bit.ly/2Crnjgu
How Did The Deepest Part Of The Ocean Get So Polluted?
 
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Scientists have found trash in the deepest parts of the ocean, the Mariana Trench. What does this mean for us and the organisms living there? What Lives In The Deepest Place On Earth? - https://youtu.be/yjk_EzOoHyw Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Thanks to our sponsor for supporting DNews! Check out Graze at https://www.graze.com/us/ and use coupon code DNEWS for a free snack box. Read More: The Deepest Ocean Trenches Contain High Levels of Pollution http://www.seeker.com/the-deepest-ocean-trenches-contain-high-levels-of-pollution-2261084838.html "Deep ocean trenches - considered the most remote places in the world - have levels of toxic, industrial chemicals 50 times higher than a highly polluted river system in China, an analysis of tiny deep-sea animals has found. The discovery, published in today's Nature Ecology and Evolution journal, highlights the pervasive nature of pollution and destroys the belief these deep-sea wildernesses are largely safe from human degradation." Earth Day² - Encounters with Trash http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/logs/apr22/welcome.html "You may think that working in the deep sea means that we only see pristine environments, but unfortunately that isn't true. During our 5,000-meter dive in Sirena Canyon, along the Mariana Trench wall, we saw multiple pieces of marine debris. A soda can, a food tin, and a piece of rope all accompanied the fish, corals, and rocks that we imaged as we moved up the slope. We encountered even more trash (nine pieces!) on our dive the following day at Enigma Seamount, including several plastic bags and a piece of clothing." Bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants in the deepest ocean fauna http://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-016-0051 "The legacy and reach of anthropogenic influence is most clearly evidenced by its impact on the most remote and inaccessible habitats on Earth. Here we identify extraordinary levels of persistent organic pollutants in the endemic amphipod fauna from two of the deepest ocean trenches (over 10,000 metres)." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Special thanks to Jules Suzdaltsev for hosting and writing this episode of DNews! Check Jules out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jules_su
Views: 1022760 Seeker
Shouldn't sea levels have risen by now?
 
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Try Dashlane here: http://dashlane.com/simonclark Get 10% off now with my promo code: simonclark ! In this video I answer the question: 'isn't climate change supposed to have risen sea levels by now?' by looking at one dataset in some detail, and reviewing the scientific literature. Also: Kevin Costner's Waterworld. My video on stopping climate change: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkbuV_a-rvs This video was light on the potential impacts of sea level rise. I wanted to focus specifically on the perception that sea levels have not changed, and spend time on the data. If you’re interested in the potential impacts then https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/2018/02/ar5_wgII_spm_en.pdf is a must read. Anthropogenic climate change (AGW) is a fickle bit of science, and like much of environmental science sometimes changes on (relatively) long timescales and global extent can hide in plain sight. That seems to be the case with sea level rise. The data is very clear: sea levels have been rising faster and faster over the past century, and this is not caused by natural variability. Humanity's carbon emissions are radiatively forcing the planet, causing net warming and so thermal expansion of the oceans and melting of ice sheets. It appears that this is going to become more and more painfully obvious as this century wears on, and so the sooner we take action the better. REFERENCES/FOOTNOTES (1) Church and White (2011) https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10712-011-9119-1 (2) This figure from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Post-Glacial_Sea_Level.png, created by Robert Rohde based on data from Fleming et al. 1998, Fleming 2000, and Milne et al. 2005 (3) There are many excellent resources online about Milankovitch cycles. In this instance, the wiki is a good introduction: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milankovitch_cycles (4) Gross scale annual reconstruction of Greenland temperatures using data from Buizert et al (2018) https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/2017GL075601. The enormous anomalous warming circa 15kya is the Bølling-Allerød interstadial, likely caused by changes in the AMOC https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%B8lling-Aller%C3%B8d_warming (5) This figure taken from https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?webmap=f1e7378b962d42168fdefec3b6eb8b5f (6) This rate calculated based on the year to year (backward step) finite difference gradient of annual average data from (1), averaged over 30 years. (7) See http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/sorce/data/tsi-data/. 100*(~1/1370) is less than 0.1%) (8) Current data https://scripps.ucsd.edu/programs/keelingcurve/. Yes, of course, this rise is caused by humans: https://scripps.ucsd.edu/programs/keelingcurve/2018/09/19/is-the-current-rise-in-co2-definitely-caused-by-human-activities/ (9) https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/volumetric-temperature-expansion-d_315.html (10) IPCC AR5 WG1 chapter 13 https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/2018/02/WG1AR5_Chapter13_FINAL.pdf (11) Though sometimes the timeframe of long term predictions is unclear, e.g. https://www.nature.com/articles/271321a0, leading to hyperbolic interpretations. (12) This figure taken from https://blogs.egu.eu/divisions/gd/2017/09/13/modern-day-sea-level-rise/, which is a recommended read. (13) https://science2017.globalchange.gov/chapter/12/ (14) https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/jun/14/first-case-emerges-of-mammal-species-wiped-out-by-human-induced-climate-change ---------- II ---------- You can support the channel by donating at http://www.patreon.com/simonoxfphys Check out my website! https://www.simonoxfphys.com/ ---------- II ---------- My twitter - http://www.twitter.com/simonoxfphys My facebook - http://www.facebook.com/youtubesimon My insta - http://www.instagram.com/simonoxfphys My goodreads - http://www.goodreads.com/simonoxfphys ---------- II ---------- Music by Epidemic Sound: http://epidemicsound.com Stock footage provided by Bigstock: http://bit.ly/bigstock-videofreetrial Huge thanks to my supporters on Patreon: Alastair Fortune, Anne Smith, Ben McMurtry, bitreign33, Caitlin Louise, Charles Bray, Dan Hanvey, David Efird, Ethan Fuller, Filip Kermit Prick, James Bridges, jawad alalasi, Jay Wright, Jia Xin Peng, Jonathan Trimble, Julian Guggenberger, Kendall Hendrix, Kendra Johnson, Kodzo, Lachlan Woods, Leighton Mackenzie, Liam, Louis Gillet, Mark Anthony Magro, Martin Hermes, Mat Allen, Matthias Loos, Michael Phillips, Mike Wooldridge, Omar Miranda, Paul Everitt, Rory Healy, Ryke Allen, Scott Cassidy, Thusto, Tiarna Pepall, Tim Boxall, Wendover Productions
Views: 308464 Simon Clark
Sustainable Oceans & Seas - Full Video
 
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S.O.S.! Can fishing actually lead to a healthier ecosystem? Saving our oceans & seas is important to all of us. A healthy ecosystem matters. But how can we best do that and balance the needs of humans as well? Thirty years ago, New Zealand’s fisheries – along with much of the rest of the world’s – were on the brink of disaster. Overfishing led to declining fish populations. Something had to change. The result? The Quota Management System, or QMS. Today commercial fishing off New Zealand provides fish for consumers worldwide, an excellent livelihood for fishers, and a stronger, healthier ocean and fish population. How does it work? Come to New Zealand with scholar Johan Norberg and find out! Educators can also get a free DVD version of the video, as well as access a full teacher’s guide and other teaching resources by creating a free account at http://www.izzit.org. Subject Areas: ■ Business/Family & Consumer Science ■ Economics ■ World History/Geography ■ Science & Technology Topics: ■ Environmental Issues ■ Fishing ■ Maori ■ New Zealand ■ Oceans & Seas ■ Quota Management System ■ Sustainability ■ Tragedy of the Commons Want more great FREE educational stuff to go with this video? Head over to http://www.izzit.org and grab the full teacher’s guide, use the online quizzes, find additional educational resources and more! Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/izzit Visit our other educational programs here: http://www.izzit.org/products/index.php Make sure you enroll as an izzit.org member to receive your FREE teacher resources, click here to sign up now: http://www.izzit.org/join/index.php You can Tweet at us here: https://twitter.com/izzit_org Find us on Pinterest here: https://www.pinterest.com/izzitorg
Views: 9336 izzitEDU
8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures
 
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Learn about some new sea creatures that recently made their debut to the land world! Special Thanks To: Victoria Vásquez at Pacific Shark Research Center, Kim Fulton-Bennett at MBARI, Jonathan Copley at University of Southampton, and Theodore Pietsch at University of Washington Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Thomas J., Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Lucy McGlasson, Andreas Heydeck, Will and Sonja Marple, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Charles George, Christopher Collins, and Patrick D. Ashmore. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Ninja Lanternshark: http://www.deepseanews.com/2015/12/ninja-lanternshark-the-new-shark-species-you-will-never-see-coming/ http://www.oceansciencefoundation.org/josf/josf17d.pdf https://mlmlblog.wordpress.com/2016/04/13/ninjalanternshark/ Sockworms: http://www.mbari.org/deep-sea-worms-slither-around-the-bottom-of-the-animal-tree-of-life/ http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v530/n7588/full/nature16545.html#t http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v424/n6951/full/nature01851.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrlIHaClWmg http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/why-you-should-care-about-acoelomorph-flatworms-17782785/?no-ist Hoff Crabs: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0127621 http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-03/uos-iha030215.php https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gPyG6cT_pU http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew16.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew14.jpg youtube.com/expeditionlog Eyeless Shrimp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qtR18l5_ys http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slider4.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew24.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew7.jpg http://www.livescience.com/31034-embargoed-eyeless-shrimp-discovered-deepest-volcanic-vents.html youtube.com/expeditionlog Anglerfish http://www.sci-news.com/biology/science-lasiognathus-dinema-anglerfish-03102.html http://www.bioone.org/doi/10.1643/CI-14-181 http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150807-anglerfish-new-species-ocean-animals-science/ Harp Sponge http://www.mbari.org/scientists-discover-extraordinary-new-carnivorous-sponge/ - Harp sponge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC3tAtXdaik http://www.mbari.org/researchers-describe-four-new-species-of-killer-sponges-from-the-deep-sea/ - other new carnivorous sponges Casper Octopus http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1603/logs/mar2/mar2.html [images available to download and use] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rWHuwWJv3c&ab_channel=oceanexplorergov Crossota Jellyfish http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/about.html http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/background/ex1605-factsheet.pdf http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/dailyupdates/media/video/0424-jelly/0424-jelly.html
Views: 2298221 SciShow
Ocean Seeding - A New Technology that can Save Marine Life
 
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Join the conversation with #OceanSeeding In only the last 60 years we have seen the accelerated decline of the ocean environment. The demand for marine resources rises as the world population increases, which has stressed the ocean to collapse in some regions. We need new technologies that can heal the ocean; focused in the small-scale and short-term. The key is iron, it is essential for plant-like plankton, and required in exceptionally low concentrations. Only a cup of iron can revitalize a whole hectare of the ocean. It works because iron is a catalyst for photosynthesis. Iron is a metal, vital for all life on Earth, but exceedingly rare in the ocean because it rusts and sinks. Climate change and ocean warming are making iron even more scarce, driving plankton health to decline faster. Revitalizing plankton has a ripple effect on the marine ecosystem as they provide nutrients to the fish that depend on them for food. Ocean Seeding is a new technology that can catalyze the ocean back to health, recover fish stocks and ensure sustainability for the growing populations of the world. ----- Learn more at http://OceanSeeding.com ----- Hicimos una versión del video en Español: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FktBMgssn88 Video produced by Oceaneos: http://oceaneos.org Animation by Fluorfilms: http://fluorfilms.com Music by Kyle Gabler: http://kylegabler.com ----- About the collapse of ocean fisheries ----- Seafood may be gone by 2048: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/11/061102-seafood-threat.html Decreasing fish stocks: http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/endangered_species/cetaceans/threats/fishstocks/ Documenting fisheries impacts in ecosystems: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17626465 Loss of ecosystem services: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/314/5800/787 Global marine yield halved: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-2979.2012.00483.x/abstract Rapid worldwide depletion of fish: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v423/n6937/abs/nature01610.html Changing capacity in fish stocks: http://www.pnas.org/content/113/1/134.abstract Study predicts collapse of all seafood: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2006/november8/ocean-110806.html Unsustainable fishing: http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/blue_planet/problems/problems_fishing/ World review of fisheries: http://www.fao.org/docrep/013/i1820e/i1820e01.pdf ----- Climate change and decline in plankton ----- Plankton population drops since 1950: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/phytoplankton-population/ NASA study shows oceanic plankton decline: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/nasa-study-shows-oceanic-phytoplankton-declines-in-northern-hemisphere The changing ocean iron cycle: http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v6/n12/full/nclimate3147.html Recent trends in plankton composition: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GB005139/full Plankton and food energy flows: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0079661113001079 Climate change and marine plankton: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534705000650 Fisheries catch and ocean productivity: http://www.pnas.org/content/114/8/E1441.abstract Iron storage in bloom-forming plankton: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v457/n7228/abs/nature07539.html The land, air and sea system: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12626273 Dissolved iron in the world ocean: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304420397000431 Plankton decline over the past century: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v466/n7306/full/nature09268.html The footprint of climate change: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6313/aaf7671 ----- Sustainability and Ocean Seeding technology ----- Massive bloom induced by iron experiment: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v383/n6600/abs/383495a0.html Iron limitation in the Pacific Ocean: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v383/n6600/abs/383508a0.html Plankton and the warming ocean: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.12562/abstract Fraser river massive salmon return: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/pink-salmon-reaching-fraser-river-in-massive-numbers/article14298697/ Kasatochi volcano and the 2010 salmon return: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2419.2012.00630.x/abstract Iron efficiency in ocean fertilization: http://www.rug.nl/research/portal/publications/efficiency-of-carbon-removal-per-added-iron-in-ocean-iron-fertilization(3afd7612-cb67-4290-8d6f-21e9d8a4c109)/export.html Iron experiments from 1993 to 2005: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/315/5812/612 The Korean 2016 to 2020 iron fertilization experiment: http://www.biogeosciences-discuss.net/bg-2016-472/ Plankton coping with accelerating climate change: http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14434 Rebuilding global fisheries: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/325/5940/578
Views: 7356 Oceaneos
When Rodents Rafted Across the Ocean
 
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Support us on Patreon! http://patreon.com/eons The best evidence we have suggests that, while Caviomorpha originated in South America, they came from ancestors in Africa, over 40 million years ago. So how did they get there? This episode was written by Genevieve Perdue. Thanks to Ceri Thomas for the Josephoartigasia monesi reconstruction. Check out more of Ceri's paleoart at http://alphynix.tumblr.com and http://nixillustration.com Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Super special thanks to the following Patreon patrons for helping make Eons possible: Katie Fichtner, Aldo Espinosa Zúñiga, Anthony Callaghan, Esmeralda Rupp-Spangle, Gregory Donovan, Ehit Dinesh Agarwal, الخليفي سلطان, Gabriel Cortez, Marcus Lejon, Anel Salas, Robert Arévalo, Robert Hill, Kelby Reid, Todd Dittman, Betsy Radley, PS, Colin Sylvester, Philip Slingerland, John Vanek, Jose Garcia, Noah offitzer, Eric Vonk, Tony Wamsley, Henrik Peteri, Jonathan Wright, Jon Monteiro, James Bording, Brad Nicholls, Miles Chaston, Michael McClellan, Jeff Graham, Maria Humphrey, Nathan Paskett, Connor Jensen, Sapjes, Daisuke Goto, Hubert Rady, Yuntao Zhou, Gregory Kintz, Tyson Cleary, Chandler Bass, Maly Lor, Joao Ascensao, Tsee Lee, Sarah Fritts, Ruben Winter, Ron Harvey Jr, Jacob Gerke, Alex Yan If you'd like to support the channel, head over to http://patreon.com/eons and pledge for some cool rewards! Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: https://academic.oup.com/biolinnean/article/121/4/907/3095993 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11692-015-9326-7 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21993503 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/003101829190073Z http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/275/1646/1957 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316684055_Late_middle_Eocene_caviomorph_rodents_from_Contamana_Peruvian_Amazonia https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/evan.1360040605 https://www.nature.com/articles/26886 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0036299 https://books.google.com/books/about/Mammals_of_the_Neotropics_Volume_3.html?id=p2MDAzCeQQoC https://scinapse.io/papers/2167227626 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21238387 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jmor.20495 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/323/5915/732 https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/the-molecular-clock-and-estimating-species-divergence-41971 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4684-9063-3_11 https://www.jstor.org/stable/2999827 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10423268 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/book/10.1002/9781444318777 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11476632 Lavocat, R. “La syste´matique des rongeurs hystricomorphes et la de´rive des continents.” Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences Series D 269 (1969). https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4684-3764-5_17 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jeb.12937 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/256415173_Patterns_of_diversity_and_adaptation_in_South_American_hystricognath_rodents https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263582456_A_new_and_primitive_species_of_Protophiomys_Rodentia_Hystricognathi_from_the_late_middle_Eocene_of_Djebel_El_Kebar_Central_Tunisia https://www.jstor.org/stable/2401146 Merali, Z., and B.J. Skinner. Visualizing Earth Science (2009). Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/275/1646/1953 https://academic.oup.com/jmammal/article/91/1/11/831625 Mones, A., and J. Ojasti. “Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris.” Mammalian Species 264(1986). https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S161650470800092X Morrison, M.L., Marcot, B.G., and R.W. Mannan. Wildlife-Habitat Relationships: Concepts and Applications, 3rd ed. (2006). Washington, D.C.: Island Press. Nowak, R. M. Walker’s mammals of the world, 5th ed. (1991). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/8/e1600883 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/299560709_LARGE-SCALE_RICHNESS_PATTERNS_BIOGEOGRAPHY_AND_ECOLOGICAL_DIVER-_SIFICATION_IN_CAVIOMORPH_RODENTS https://scinapse.io/papers/184792926 Patton, J. L., Pardiñas, U. F. J., and G. D’Elía. Mammals of South America, Vol. 2, Rodents (2015). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16551580 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2599941/ https://www.jstor.org/stable/25654250 Scotese, C.R. “A Continental Drift Flipbook.” The Journal of Geology 112.6 (2004). Simpson, G.G. 1940. “Mammals and land bridges.” Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences 30 (1940). https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282577627_Evolution_of_the_caviomorph_rodents_a_complete_phylogeny_and_timetree_of_living_genera
Views: 405178 PBS Eons
Microplastics In The Ocean Are A Mega Problem: Plastic Pollution Runs Deep In Monterey Bay
 
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The Aquarium and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) joined forces to design the first study to look systematically at microplastic from the ocean’s surface to the seafloor. Published in Scientific Reports on June 6, the study shows that plastic debris less than 5 millimeters across, known as microplastic, is common throughout the water column of Monterey Bay with highest concentrations around 600-1800 feet. By sampling giant larvacean sinkers and pelagic red crabs, researchers found that these tiny plastic pieces are entering marine food webs, both at the surface and in the deep. The study shows that most of this microplastic is coming from consumer products—which means reducing plastic manufacturing and usage is the best way to mitigate this serious threat to the ocean. Read more on the Aquarium's Future Of The Oceans blog: https://futureoftheocean.wordpress.com/2019/06/06/the-deep-impact-of-microplastic/ Link to paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-44117-2 ------- Whale hello there! We hope you liked this video. Subscribe to our channel for more from the Monterey Bay and our mission to inspire conservation of the ocean: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_... We're on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MontereyAq And Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/montereybaya... Instagram too: https://www.instagram.com/montereybay... You can also follow the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute! MBARI Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MBARInews MBAR Twitter: https://twitter.com/MBARI_News MBARI Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mbari_news
Views: 1194 Monterey Bay Aquarium
Teeny, Tiny Plastic Monsters: Microplastics in our Ocean
 
01:11:54
Join us for an evening with Dr. Peter Ross to hear about some of the tiniest “monsters” in our ocean today. Dr. Peter Ross is the Director of the Ocean Pollution Research Program at Vancouver Aquarium. In more than 25 years of marine pollution research, he pioneered new techniques to evaluate the effects of persistent pollutants on the health of fish and marine mammals, including killer whales, beluga whales, sea otters, harbour seals and salmon. In early 2014, his team discovered widespread distribution of microplastic particles in BC’s coastal waters. He is an international expert in the area of ocean pollution, having published more than 130 scientific articles and book chapters.
Views: 5542 Vancouver Aquarium
10 Biggest Sea Dinosaurs That Ever Existed on Earth
 
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Whatever lives in the sea nowadays can't be compared with the huge monsters that dominated the depths millions of years ago. And by “monsters” we mean long-extinct marine reptiles and dinosaurs. Since many people are better acquainted with the land-roaming giants of the past, this video will open your eyes to those that ruled the waters! Did you know, for example, that pliosauruses were real giants, with the largest species weighing more than 30 tons and growing up to 40 feet long? Also, this animal had an incredibly strong bite. In fact, it was four times more powerful than that of the mighty T-rex! TIMESTAMPS: Pliosaurus 1:14 Kronosaurus 2:15 Nothosaurus 3:07 Styxosaurus 4:10 Albertonectes 5:15 Thalassomedon 6:16 Tylosaurus 7:23 Shonisaurus 8:07 Mosasaurus 9:00 Shastasaurus 9:53 #dinosaurs #prehistoricanimals #seacreatures Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - The largest Kronosaurus ever found was 34 feet long from snout to tail and likely weighed about 12 tons. This marine reptile’s teeth weren't really deadly; they were only a few inches long and not all that sharp. - . Some experts state that Nothosauruses could snap their long heads sideways to catch a passing fish, kinda like how a crocodile does. Surprisingly, researchers say that these reptiles shared a lot of similar features with the modern sea lion. - The Styxosaurus belonged to the Plesiosaur family and lived during the Late Cretaceous Period, around 85 to 70 million years ago. Styxosauruses were about 35 feet in length, but over 16 feet of that consisted just of their long snake-like neck! They had a comparatively small body and weighed approximately 4 tons. - The Albertonectes was another representative of the Plesiosaur family, meaning that this marine reptile had a small head on an incredibly long neck and large flipper-like limbs that helped it move through the water. These creatures occupied the seas around North America 76 to 70 million years ago. - Thalassomedon means “sea lord” in ancient Greek, and there's a pretty good reason behind this name. These representatives of the Plesiosaur family were huge predators that could reach 40 feet in length. That’s about as big as 4-story building! - The Tylosaurus belonged to the Mosasaur family. It dominated the shallow seas of North America about 85 to 80 million years ago. This was an enormous predator, with the biggest representatives reaching 45 feet in length. - The Shonisaurus lived on our planet during the Late Triassic Period, approximately 215 million years ago. The remains of this creature were first discovered in Nevada in 1920, not far from the Shoshone Mountains. This prehistoric reptile resembled a huge chubby dolphin. - The Mosasaurus is a truly gigantic predator that dominated the seas all over the world about 66 million years ago. According to fossil evidence, some specimens could be more than 50 feet in length. This fact makes the Mosasaurus the biggest marine carnivore of its time. - The Shastasaurus is the biggest marine reptile that has ever existed. These predators lived during the Late Triassic Period about 210 million years ago. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 980068 BRIGHT SIDE
A Shark Scarier Than the Megalodon Could Exist
 
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Do you know anything about the Black Demon? While oceans cover more than 70% of our planet's surface, people have explored only 5% of the ocean floor. So it's no wonder that the incredible depths hide some pretty terrifying secrets! For example, there’s the Black Demon, a legendary shark said to equal the prehistoric Megalodon in size. According to the legend, the Black Demon resembles the infamous Megalodon. This terrifying creature was first noticed not far from Mexico's Baja Coast in the Gulf of California. People started to report a huge black shark whose size could be compared with that of the Megalodon. It resembled the great white shark but for its massive tail and dark coloring. The creature got the nickname “El Demonio Negro” (which is Spanish for “The Black Demon”). This shark treats humans extremely aggressively. According to several reports, the creature systematically attacks boats. TIMESTAMPS: How big was the Megalodon shark? 1:36 Where the Black Demon was first noticed 3:21 How the Black Demon looks like 4:01 Why is the Black Demon black? 5:37 What researchers think about Black Demon 5:58 Which other creatures live in depths 7:17 #megalodon #sharks Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - Megalodon was a prehistoric predator that lived from 23 to 2.6 million years ago. It was a truly massive creature. It could grow up to 60 ft, which is longer than a school bus, and its weight could be more than 70 tons, which equals the weight of 10 elephants. - The Black Demon was first noticed not far from Mexico's Baja Coast in the Gulf of California. People started to report a huge black shark whose size could be compared with that of the Megalodon. - In 2008, fisherman Eric Mack stated that a huge black shark rocked his boat. He also mentioned that the shark had large sharp teeth and a huge tail that stuck out of the water for no less than 5 ft. The animal looked like a great white but was much more massive. - In 2012, a real great white shark was caught in the Sea of Cortez. It was more than 20 ft long and weighed a whopping 2,000 lb. However, it was white and didn't resemble the shark described in the legend. - Some scientists think that if the Black Demon really exists, it's probably an oversized great white that suffers from melanism. - Other researchers hope that the mysterious animal might be a new species of shark that evolved from the Megalodon. Naturally, there are also skeptics who are sure that the Black Demon is a whale shark. - There's no real proof of its existence except for the testimonies of eyewitnesses. At the same time, nobody can claim that the creature doesn't exist, even if it hasn't been found. - In those depths live the most bizarre animals ever known. Ghost sharks, demon cat sharks, deep-sea dogfish. Some of them look like characters from a low-budget horror film. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1707377 BRIGHT SIDE
Plastic Ocean
 
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United Nations - Plastic - both a wonderful invention and a scourge on our planet. Over 300 million tons will be produced this year. Most is never recycled and remains on our land and in our seas for ever. Our story shows the damage to all creatures who depend on the ocean for their food – from birds… to us. 21st Century: Episode #126 This is an adaptation from the original documentary “A Plastic Ocean” by the Plastic Oceans Foundation Script: http://www.un.org/webcast/pdfs/21stcshow126plasticocean.pdf
Views: 1368022 United Nations
8 GREAT TIPS FOR SURVIVAL AT SEA
 
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Most of us adore beach resorts and go to one of the large saltwater bodies at least once a year. However, we shouldn’t forget that the sea is as attractive as it is wayward. We at Bright Side wondered how a person who happened to be in the open sea should behave. It turns out there are several rules that aren’t at all difficult to remember. Despair is your most dangerous enemy. Don’t give up hope of being saved. There are many stories of people who were found in the open sea months after their disappearance. For instance, 25-year-old sailor Poon Lim, who worked on a British merchant ship, survived alone 133 days in the open sea. After a shipwreck, he managed to find a raft with fresh water, cookies, flares, and a flashlight. Every day, Lim ate only 2 cookies and made 3 sips of water. To avoid muscle atrophy, he even floated around the raft twice a day. As you can see, human possibilities are endless. The main thing is to keep calm and hope for the best. TIMESTAMPS Calm down 0:35 Choose the right swimming style 0:57 Find something that floats 1:37 Take care of clothes 1:55 Decide what you’ll eat 2:16 Provide yourself with liquid 3:01 Save yourself properly 4:02 Don’t lose hope 5:06 SUMMARY: - Panic definitely won’t help you. It can cloud your judgment and make you lose the rhythm of breathing. Therefore, the first thing you should do is to calm down. - The style of swimming you choose determines how long your strength will last. In calm water, it’s better to swim on your back. If waves splash around you, it’s better to swim on your belly. - If you’re in the open sea as a result of a shipwreck or an airplane water landing, there must be plenty of things around you that perfectly keep afloat. It will be even better if it’s a boat or a raft with which ships are equipped. - Remember that open sunlight can be extremely dangerous. So don’t remove your clothes — they’ll protect you from the sun. - If you have rations, divide them into small daily portions. This will make them last for a long time, and you won’t have problems with digestion. - Try to fish even if you have stores of food. After all, fish contain some liquid. - You have to consume the liquid constantly but never drink seawater. - Try to ensure that you always have a couple of empty containers left for collecting rainwater. According to studies, drinking untreated rainwater is safe for your health. - • If you found fluorescein, dissolve it in the water when you see an airplane or ship. It forms a bright spot around you which can be easily seen from the air and from afar. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 4918530 BRIGHT SIDE
Why these plankton are eating plastic
 
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Microfibers, used to make things like yoga pants, are the ocean’s tiniest problem. This video is presented by Brilliant: https://brilliant.org/vox Correction: At 1:04, we mistakenly suggested that rayon is made from plastic. In fact, it is derived from cellulose. To go deeper on this topic, make sure to read Vox science reporter Brian Resnick’s article on Vox.com: https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2018/9/19/17800654/clothes-plastic-pollution-polyester-washing-machine Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0111913 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-018-0080-1 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X16307639 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0111913 https://www.nature.com/articles/srep14340#f3 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749116311666#undfig1 https://www.nature.com/articles/srep33997 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/345/6193/144 When you think of marine pollution, you might picture an oil-slicked seal struggling to breathe on a blackened beach, or a turtle looping in circles with the plastic collar of a six-pack wrapped around its neck. In the past, those powerful images have generated interest and resources for fighting marine pollution, but now a new, much tinier threat is emerging. Microplastics — meaning any plastic object smaller than five millimeters — constitute the vast majority of plastic particles polluting marine habitats. Of those microplastics, a large share are microfibers: tiny strands of plastic that are woven into fabric used to make clothing. These fabrics, known by names like polyester and nylon, are cheap to produce, comfortable to wear, and since arriving on the market in the late 1940s, companies have been using more and more of them. Every time we do laundry, a small amount of microfibers are separated from clothes made from these materials. Since those pieces of plastic are extremely small, they're able to make their way through water treatment centers and into marine resources. Once they reach marine habitats, the ocean’s tiniest creatures consume them, and microfibers work their way up the food chain. Eventually, they reach us. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: https://www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 1066938 Vox
Ocean | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocean 00:03:58 1 Etymology 00:04:55 2 Earth's global ocean 00:05:04 2.1 Oceanic divisions 00:05:59 2.2 Global system 00:06:34 2.3 Physical properties 00:09:04 2.4 Oceanic zones 00:14:01 2.5 Exploration 00:14:58 2.6 Oceanic maritime currents 00:17:28 2.7 Climate 00:19:13 2.8 Biology 00:22:13 2.9 Gases 00:22:21 2.10 Surface 00:22:30 2.11 Mixing time 00:22:39 2.12 Salinity 00:24:19 2.13 Absorption of light 00:24:28 2.14 Economic value 00:24:55 2.15 Waves and swell 00:25:23 3 Extraterrestrial oceans 00:25:48 3.1 Planets 00:27:15 3.2 Natural satellites 00:28:52 3.3 Dwarf planets and trans-Neptunian objects 00:29:37 3.4 Extrasolar 00:31:55 3.5 Non-water surface liquids Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.764358731665983 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An ocean (from Ancient Greek Ὠκεανός, transc. Okeanós) is a body of saline water that composes much of a planet's hydrosphere. On Earth, an ocean is one of the major conventional divisions of the World Ocean. These are, in descending order by area, the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern (Antarctic), and Arctic Oceans. The word "ocean" is often used interchangeably with "sea" in American English. Strictly speaking, a sea is a body of saline water (generally a division of the world ocean) partly or fully enclosed by land, though "the sea" refers also to the oceans. Saline water covers approximately 361,000,000 km2 (139,000,000 sq mi) and is customarily divided into several principal oceans and smaller seas, with the ocean covering approximately 71% of Earth's surface and 90% of the Earth's biosphere. The ocean contains 97% of Earth's water, and oceanographers have stated that less than 5% of the World Ocean has been explored. The total volume is approximately 1.35 billion cubic kilometers (320 million cu mi) with an average depth of nearly 3,700 meters (12,100 ft).As the world ocean is the principal component of Earth's hydrosphere, it is integral to life, forms part of the carbon cycle, and influences climate and weather patterns. The World Ocean is the habitat of 230,000 known species, but because much of it is unexplored, the number of species that exist in the ocean is much larger, possibly over two million. The origin of Earth's oceans is unknown; oceans are thought to have formed in the Hadean eon and may have been the impetus for the emergence of life. Extraterrestrial oceans may be composed of water or other elements and compounds. The only confirmed large stable bodies of extraterrestrial surface liquids are the lakes of Titan, although there is evidence for the existence of oceans elsewhere in the Solar System. Early in their geologic histories, Mars and Venus are theorized to have had large water oceans. The Mars ocean hypothesis suggests that nearly a third of the surface of Mars was once covered by water, and a runaway greenhouse effect may have boiled away the global ocean of Venus. Compounds such as salts and ammonia dissolved in water lower its freezing point so that water might exist in large quantities in extraterrestrial environments as brine or convecting ice. Unconfirmed oceans are speculated beneath the surface of many dwarf planets and natural satellites; notably, the ocean of Europa is estimated to have over twice the water volume of Earth. The Solar System's giant planets are also thought to have liquid atmospheric layers of yet to be confirmed compositions. Oceans may also exist on exoplanets and exomoons, including surface oceans of liquid water within a circumstellar habitable zone. Ocean planets are a hypothetical type of planet with a surface completely covered with liquid.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Why Can't We Get Power From Waves?
 
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Thanks to OIST for sponsoring this video. To learn more, visit https://admissions.oist.jp/ Wave power hasn’t yet made a splash because it’s hard to use waves to spin turbines, and because the sea is a harsh place to build things. Thanks also to our Patreon patrons https://www.patreon.com/MinuteEarth and our YouTube members. ___________________________________________ To learn more, start your googling with these keywords: Wave energy converter - a device for turning the mechanical energy of ocean waves into mechanical energy (flow of a substance) or electrical energy Oscillating water column - an open-bottomed chamber filled with air and water, whose wave action moves the water column up and down like a piston, forcing the air out past a turbine Attenuator - a long multisegment floating structure oriented parallel to the direction waves travel, where differing heights of waves along the length of the device flex the connections driving hydraulic pumps that can be connected to turbines Oscillating body - a floating buoy that oscillates with waves, generating electricity within the buoy or by pulling on a generator or by pumping water through a turbine Overtopping device - a reservoir filled by waves to a height higher the average nearby ocean, into which reservoir water is released, spinning a turbine Biofouling - undesirable growth of organisms like barnacles and algae on underwater surfaces Ocean wave - energy passing through water and causing it to move in a circular motion Turbine - a machine for producing continuous power in which a wheel with blades gets hit by a fast-moving flow of water, steam, gas, air, or other fluid, and spins (often connected to a magnet that spins) Induction - the production of an electric current in a wire by movement of a nearby magnetic field ___________________________________________ If you liked this week’s video, you might also like: Why Wave Power Has Lagged Far Behind as Energy Source https://e360.yale.edu/features/why_wave_power_has_lagged_far_behind_as_energy_source _________________________________________ Subscribe to MinuteEarth on YouTube: http://goo.gl/EpIDGd Support us on Patreon: https://goo.gl/ZVgLQZ And visit our website: https://www.minuteearth.com/ Say hello on Facebook: http://goo.gl/FpAvo6 And Twitter: http://goo.gl/Y1aWVC And download our videos on itunes: https://goo.gl/sfwS6n ___________________________________________ Credits: Script Writer & Narrator: Alex Reich Video Illustrator: Arcadi Garcia Rius Video Directors: David Goldenberg & Julián Gómez With Contributions From: Henry Reich, Kate Yoshida, Ever Salazar, Peter Reich, David Goldenberg Music by: Nathaniel Schroeder: http://www.soundcloud.com/drschroeder ___________________________________________ References: Aderinto, T., & Li, H. 2018. Ocean wave energy converters: Status and challenges. Energies, 11(5), 1250. https://www.mdpi.com/1996-1073/11/5/1250/pdf Khan, N., Kalair, A., Abas, N., & Haider, A. 2017. Review of ocean tidal, wave and thermal energy technologies. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 72, 590-604. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.01.079 Lewis, A., et al. 2011. Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, et al (eds)], Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/2018/03/Chapter-6-Ocean-Energy-1.pdf Pérez-Collazo, C., Greaves, D., & Iglesias, G. 2015. A review of combined wave and offshore wind energy. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 42, 141-153. 10.1016/j.rser.2014.09.032 Shintake, T. 2016. Harnessing the Power of Breaking Waves. In Proceedings of the 3rd Asian Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (AWTEC2016) (Vol. 174, pp. 9-13). http://bit.ly/2U0tt1I Shintake, T. March 2019. Personal communication. Tollefson, J. 2014. Power from the oceans: Blue energy. Nature News, 508(7496), 302. https://www.nature.com/articles/508302a Uihlein, A., & Magagna, D. 2016. Wave and tidal current energy–A review of the current state of research beyond technology. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 58, 1070-1081. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364032115016676 US Department of the Interior. May 2006. Technology White Paper on Wave Energy Potential on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf. https://www.boem.gov/Wave-Energy-White-Paper-2006/ Wang, Z. L. 2017. New wave power. Nature, 542(7640), 159-160. http://bit.ly/2HYE2v5
Views: 985654 MinuteEarth
The Largest Sea Creature Ever | Size Comparison
 
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What are the biggest sea creatures? Think you know what lurks in the depths of the ocean? While nearly 95% of our oceans haven’t been explored yet, it’s hard not to let your imagination run wild. But thanks to brave explorers, deep-sea cameras, and awesome archaeologists, we do know about some pretty incredible sea creatures living in our waters today…and millions of years ago. From the 9-ft spider crab to the 60-ft prehistoric Megalodon, these sea dwellers come in all shapes and sizes! Have you ever heard about lion’s mane jellyfish? This invertebrate can grow up to 120 ft long! And it boasts a whopping 8 sets of 70 to 150 tentacles! Oh, boy! Other videos you might like: 10 Extinct Creatures That Could Have Ruined The World https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNBTGhzKOo0& Who Lives In the Deepest Place On Earth? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sq4lbCC24js& If You Ever See This on the Beach, Cry for Help! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mG8wjnBKBPA TIMESTAMPS: Dwarf lanternshark 0:53 Whale shark 1:33 Megalodon 2:23 Shonisaurus 3:49 Ophthalmosaurus 4:26 Liopleurodon 5:06 Ichthyosaurus 5:46 Orca 6:30 Narwhal 6:40 Blue whale 7:00 Lion’s mane jellyfish 7:57 Siphonophore 8:36 Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - According to National Geographic, one of the smallest sharks scientists know about is called the dwarf lanternshark, and they’re an adorable 7” to 8” long. - The whale shark is not only a massive shark but is the largest known fish species alive, according to National Geographic. An average adult whale shark can grow as long as a school bus! - Megalodon roamed the ocean a long time ago — oh, about 15.9 to 2.6 million years back between the early Miocene and late Pliocene eras. It could reach anywhere between 45 ft to 60 ft in length with jaws more than 6 ft wide! - Shonisaurus lived on Earth during the late Triassic Period, about 215 million years ago. These prehistoric reptiles grew to be about 50 ft long and weighed about 60,000 lb! - Ophthalmosaurus thrived during the late Jurassic period and lived in oceans all over the world. It weighed somewhere around 6,000 lb and grew to approximately 16 ft long. - Another marine reptile that lived during the Jurassic Period was known as Liopleurodon. A more aggressive marine reptile, these carnivorous sea beasts weighed about 5,000 lb and grew to around 30 ft long. - Ichthyosaurus only grew to about 6 ft, which would put them at the same height as a guy who was slightly taller than average today. - The orca, also known as the killer whale, is a toothed whale and can grow to anywhere from 23 ft to 32 ft, which is slightly smaller than a school bus. - The largest whale that still exists today is the blue whale. If you were to put a blue whale next to a school bus, it would look like it could swallow it. - The Portuguese man o’ war, tentacles and all, can reach a length of 165 ft long. While this thing may look a lot like a jellyfish, it’s actually known as a siphonophore, and there are hundreds and sometimes thousands of them that are genetically identical. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Photos: https://www.depositphotos.com East News ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 508935 BRIGHT SIDE
If You Ever See This on the Beach, Cry for Help!
 
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How do you recognize something that you can touch and something you have to run away from as fast as possible? Here is a list of the most dangerous sea creatures you can meet and how to recognize them! There are so many different species living in the ocean! Some of them are beautiful, some are deadly, and some are both. TIMESTAMPS Fire Coral 0:40 Flower Urchin 1:20 Cone Snail 1:50 Portuguese Man-of-War 2:32 Snea snakes 3:54 Lionfish 4:51 Chironex 5:39 Surgeonfish 6:15 Indonesian needlefish 6:59 Triggerfish 7:34 SUMMARY - Fire Coral. These small organisms can sting, and the effect can be not very serious and it can be quite bad. A stung person may have severe pains, feel nauseated and even vomit, which is not the best thing to do when you are underwater. - Flower Urchin is both very beautiful and very deadly. It contains toxins that can cause anaphylactic shock, convulsions and finally death. You can get poisoned if you step on it when you are in the sea or the ocean. - Scientists say that just one drop of the cone snail’s poison is enough to kill 20 people! Just one drop! - The most mind-blowing fact about Man-of-War is that technically we should call it Men-of-War, and refer to it not as «it», but «they», and here is why: it’s an animal that is made up of a colony of organisms cooperating together. Man-of-war has tentacles that can be 30 feet long, which it uses to paralyze and kill fish and other small creatures. - Sea snakes are much more venomous than their land-living friends. As it turns out, they have to be like that because they hunt fish, so what they need to do is immobilize their prey very quickly not to let it escape. - Many people call the lionfish the most beautiful sea creature in the world. You can find them in the Caribbean and Eastern Atlantic. Lionfishes are not deadly — they do have a venom, but it’s not lethal. However, the pain you will experience if you get stung is so severe that people say you might wish you were dead. - Chironex doesn’t have any teeth, but it’s dangerous as hell. If a person gets stung, they will have excruciating pain, red inflammation in the stung area and heart dysfunction. - Surgeonfish are easily spooked, so you should be extra careful if you see one of them. Don’t make any unexpected fast moves. The good news is, surgeonfish are not aggressive unless, of course, you provoke them. - Indonesian needlefish live in tropical and subtropical waters of the oceans. They, as the name suggests, have a very sharp, needle-like beak, and they are especially dangerous when they hurl themselves out of the water. - Triggerfish is mostly friendly, but only until you are a threat to its nest. The most dangerous are females — if you approach its nest even accidentally, it will bite you. Thankfully, the bites aren’t poisonous, but triggerfish have extremely sharp teeth, so the injuries it can cause need serious medical attention. If you know about any other sea animals that we haven’t told about, let us know in the comment section below! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 17704489 BRIGHT SIDE