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Introduction to intercultural communication
 
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A short video introduction to intercultural communication. Produced for MobiVET2.0 project: www.mobivet2.eu
Views: 7881 e-Training Solutions
What is INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION? What does INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION mean?
 
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The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 What is INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION? What does INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION mean? INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION meaning - INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION definition - INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Intercultural communication is a form of communication that aims to share information across different cultures and social groups. It is used to describe the wide range of communication processes and problems that naturally appear within an organization or social context made up of individuals from different religious, social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds. Intercultural communication is sometimes used synonymously with cross-cultural communication. In this sense it seeks to understand how people from different countries and cultures act, communicate and perceive the world around them. Many people in intercultural business communication argue that culture determines how individuals encode messages, what medium they choose for transmitting them, and the way messages are interpreted. With regard to intercultural communication proper, it studies situations where people from different cultural backgrounds interact. Aside from language, intercultural communication focuses on social attributes, thought patterns, and the cultures of different groups of people. It also involves understanding the different cultures, languages and customs of people from other countries. Intercultural communication plays a role in social sciences such as anthropology, cultural studies, linguistics, psychology and communication studies. Intercultural communication is also referred to as the base for international businesses. There are several cross-cultural service providers around who can assist with the development of intercultural communication skills. Research is a major part of the development of intercultural communication skills. Cross-cultural business communication is very helpful in building cultural intelligence through coaching and training in cross-cultural communication, cross-cultural negotiation, multicultural conflict resolution, customer service, business and organizational communication. Cross-cultural understanding is not just for incoming expats. Cross-cultural understanding begins with those responsible for the project and reaches those delivering the service or content. The ability to communicate, negotiate and effectively work with people from other cultures is vital to international business. The problems in intercultural communication usually come from problems in message transmission. In communication between people of the same culture, the person who receives the message interprets it based on values, beliefs, and expectations for behavior similar to those of the person who sent the message. When this happens, the way the message is interpreted by the receiver is likely to be fairly similar to what the speaker intended. However, when the receiver of the message is a person from a different culture, the receiver uses information from his or her culture to interpret the message. The message that the receiver interprets may be very different from what the speaker intended. Attribution is the process in which people look for an explanation of another person's behavior. When someone does not understand another, he/she usually blames the confusion on the other's "stupidity, deceit, or craziness". Effective communication depends on the informal understandings among the parties involved that are based on the trust developed between them. When trust exists, there is implicit understanding within communication, cultural differences may be overlooked, and problems can be dealt with more easily. The meaning of trust and how it is developed and communicated vary across societies. Similarly, some cultures have a greater propensity to be trusting than others.
Views: 32272 The Audiopedia
What is CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION? What does CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION mean?
 
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What is CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION? What does CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION mean? CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION meaning - CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION definition - CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Cross-cultural communication is a field of study that looks at how people from differing cultural backgrounds communicate, in similar and different ways among themselves, and how they endeavour to communicate across cultures. Intercultural communication is a related field of study. During the Cold War, the economy of the United States was largely self-contained because the world was polarized into two separate and competing powers: the East and the West. However, changes and advancements in economic relationships, political systems, and technological options began to break down old cultural barriers. Business transformed from individual-country capitalism to global capitalism. Thus, the study of cross-cultural communication was originally found within businesses and government, both seeking to expand globally. Businesses began to offer language training to their employees and programs were developed to train employees to understand how to act when abroad. With this also came the development of the Foreign Service Institute, or FSI, through the Foreign Service Act of 1946, where government employees received trainings and prepared for overseas posts. There began also implementation of a “world view” perspective in the curriculum of higher education. In 1974, the International Progress Organization, with the support of UNESCO and under the auspices of Senegalese President Léopold Sédar Senghor, held an international conference on "The Cultural Self-comprehension of Nations" (Innsbruck, Austria, 27–29 July 1974) which called upon United Nations member states "to organize systematic and global comparative research on the different cultures of the world" and "to make all possible efforts for a more intensive training of diplomats in the field of international cultural co-operation ... and to develop the cultural aspects of their foreign policy." In the past decade, there has become an increasing pressure for universities across the world to incorporate intercultural and international understanding and knowledge into the education of their students. International literacy and cross-cultural understanding have become critical to a country’s cultural, technological, economic, and political health. It has become essential for universities to educate, or more importantly, “transform”, to function effectively and comfortably in a world characterized by close, multi-faceted relationships and permeable borders. Students must possess a certain level of global competence to understand the world they live in and how they fit into this world. This level of global competence starts at ground level- the university and its faculty- with how they generate and transmit cross-cultural knowledge and information to students. Cross-cultural communication endeavours to bring together such relatively unrelated areas as cultural anthropology and established areas of communication. Its core is to establish and understand how people from different cultures communicate with each other. Its charge is to also produce some guidelines with which people from different cultures can better communicate with each other. Cross-cultural communication, as with many scholarly fields, is a combination of many other fields. These fields include anthropology, cultural studies, psychology and communication. The field has also moved both toward the treatment of interethnic relations, and toward the study of communication strategies used by co-cultural populations, i.e., communication strategies used to deal with majority or mainstream populations. The study of languages other than one's own can serve not only to help one understand what we as humans have in common, but also to assist in the understanding of the diversity which underlines our languages' methods of constructing and organizing knowledge. Such understanding has profound implications with respect to developing a critical awareness of social relationships. Understanding social relationships and the way other cultures work is the groundwork of successful globalization business affairs.
Views: 18404 The Audiopedia
Culture, Communication and Conflict
 
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Intercultural Communication Assignment 2 Article taken from : http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/11/23/koreas.clash.explainer/index.html
Views: 362 Melanie Abraham
Strategies to Overcome Intercultural Miscommunication
 
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Informative Speech for Public Speaking 751 Topic : Strategies to Overcome Intercultural Miscommunication References : 1. http://work.chron.com/use-good-communication-skills-crosscultural-diversity-8317.html 2. http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/cultural-services/articles/ten-tips-cross-cultural-communication.html
Views: 131 Syafiqah Nasir
interracial communication
 
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A video montage comparing several articles.
Views: 172 jaws30081
Communication Research Proposal
 
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All clips used in the presentation are accordingly credited.
Views: 48 Charisse Salarda
Global One Series: Intercultural Communication
 
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Start your free trial to get unlimited access to The BizLibrary Collection! https://www.bizlibrary.com/free-trial/ Visit Us: https://www.bizlibrary.com/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/bizlibrary Follow us on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/bizlibrary
Views: 1338 BizLibrary
Intercultural Communication Adventure with Little Pilot
 
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What makes for good intercultural communication? What is cross cultural awareness? Why are diversity issues important? Well, let Little Pilot help you discover the answers as he navigates the globe in his cultural cockpit with the help of a diversity dashboard.
Views: 330784 DrDeborahSwallow
Intercultural Communication Workshop
 
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Based on the analysis and synthesis paper on the intercultural communication workshop presented by K. Brillinger
Views: 1454 Theresa Shin
Article Speech
 
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Adam Copps Comms 1300 D02 Biblography: Inoue, Yukiko. "Cultural Fluency as a Guide to Effective Intercultural Communication:." The Case of Japan and the U.S. Journal of Intercultural Communication, Nov. 2007. Web. 20 Mar. 2014. http://www.immi.se/intercultural/nr15....
Views: 5 Jared Bressler
From Communicative Competence to Meta Cultural Competence: Towards an EIL Based Pedagogy
 
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From Communicative Competence to Meta Cultural Competence: Towards an EIL Based Pedagogy A keynote Speech by Prof. Farzad Sharifian (Monash Univerity) The 1ST NATIONAL ENGLISH LANGUAGE CONFERENCE: NEW DIRECTIONS IN ELT AND LITERATURE, 11-13 May 2016 ARDABIL, IRAN Since Chomsky’s made the distinction between competence and performance, the notion of ‘competence’ has found a pivotal place in ELT.During late 1970s and early 1980s, Dell Hyme’s notion of ‘communicative competence’, a reaction to the narrowness of Chomsky’s‘competence’, gave rise to the paradigm shift in ELT known as ‘Communicative Language Teaching’. During the 1980 and 1990s several scholars put forward various proposals framed as components of communicative competence. These included ‘sociolinguistic competence’, ‘strategic competence’ (Canale and Swain, 1980), ‘discourse competence’ (Canale, 1984), ‘organizational competence’, and ‘pragmatic competence’ (Bachman, 1990). Michael Byram (e.g., 1997) was among the first to argue for a need for an intercultural dimension to the notion of competence, for as he pointed out L2 learning naturally involves exposure to and interaction with speakers from a different cultural background. The last two decades have witnessed an upsurge of models and definitions,such as ‘intercultural communicative competence’ (ICC), and simply ‘intercultural competence’ (e.g. Deardorff, 2009), for a culture-based notion of competence. Other proposals to which the notion of competence has been applied include ‘symbolic competence’ (Kramsch, 2011) and transcultural communicative competence’ (Ting-Toomey, 1999). In a recent article, Martin (2015, p. 6) argues that most models and theories of ICC remain limiting in that they narrowly focus on “the ABC (affect, behaviour, and cognition/knowledge) triumvirate”. This keynote critically reviews some models of intercultural competence, and discusses how the notion of meta-cultural competence(Sharifian, 2013) can provide an alternative that acknowledges the complexity that characterizes communication in English as an International Language in the 21st century. Metacultural competence enables interlocutors to communicate and negotiate their cultural conceptualizations explicitly. Unlike very broad and binary (source culture versus target culture) notions of culture, the concept of metacultural competence focuses on a dynamic and pluralistic view of cultural encounters and experiences (Sharifian, in press). This keynote elaborates on this theme and provides some examples of metacultural competence in action. References Bachman, L.F., & Palmer, A.S. (1996). Language Testing in Practice: Designing and Developing Useful Language Tests. Oxford: OUP. Byram, M. (1997). Teaching and Assessing Intercultural Communicative Competence. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters. Canale, M. (1983). From communicative competence to communicative language pedagogy. In Richards, J. C., & Schmidt, R. W. (Eds.), Language and Communication, 2-27. London: Longman. Canale, M.& Swain, M. (1980). "Theoretical bases of communicative approaches to second language teaching and testing". Applied Linguistics 1.1–47 Deardorff, D. K. (ed.) (2009). The Sage Handbook of Intercultural Competence. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage, pp 456–476. Kramsch, C. (2011). The symbolic dimensions of the intercultural. Language Teaching, 44(3). 354-367 Martin, J. N. (2015). Revisiting intercultural communication competence: Where to go from here. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 48, 6-8. Sharifian, F. (2013) Globalisation and developing meta-cultural competence in learning English as an International Language, Multilingual Education, 3(7). Available at http://www.multilingual-education.com/content/pdf/2191-5059-3-7.pdf. Sharifian, F. (in press). Learning Intercultural Competence. In Jack C. Richards and Ann Burns (eds.) Cambridge Guide to Second Language Learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Ting-Toomey, S. (1999). Communicating across cultures. New York: The Guilford Press.
Views: 1848 Mehdi Solhi
Intercultural competence
 
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This video is part of the Specialty in Teaching and Learning of English as a Foreign Language of the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional that deals about Interculturality.
Views: 3902 UPNAjusco
Daily Living in a Cross Cultural Setting
 
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Please visit http://www.authenticjourneys.info/2012/02/communication-in-intercultural-setting.html for the accompanying article.
Views: 160 Amritsari Pepper
Art Of Life Experiencing Cultural Communications
 
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COM 263 GC WEEK 6 COMPLETE WORK LATEST Just Click on Below Link To Download This Course: URL= http://www.tutorialsexperts.us/product/com-263-gc-week-6-complete-work-latest/ Contact Us [email protected] COM 263 GC Week 6 Complete Work Latest COM263 COM 263 GC Week 6 Complete Work Latest COM 263 GC Week 6 Discussion 1 What are some positive outcomes of intercultural conflict? Think about a recent example in your own life and explain why you think it occurred and how you benefited from the experience? COM 263 GC Week 6 Discussion 2 How does your cultural background affect how you handle conflict? COM 263 GC Week 6 Assignment Latest Details: Find a recent situation in which a conflict related to cultural differences occurred. You can find the situation by asking a friend if they have had any experiences, looking into the news/media for an example, or relating a personal experience you witnessed. In a total of 500-750 words, write out the details of the conflict as communicated by the source of the story. 1. Based on your research in intercultural communication, explain why you think the conflict arose (reference at least one source from the textbook and/or scholarly articles on intercultural conflict to back up your recommendations). 2. Explain the role of mass media and/or new media in shaping the conflict (e.g., Is one communicator responding to a negative, stereotyped view of the other?). Explain the connections between the communication behaviors of each individual in this conflict scenario and their differing worldviews. 3. Write out a consultation (250-500 words from the total), outlining what the communicators in the conflict scenario need to know or do to best handle the conflict. Be specific in your recommendations and justify them with scholarly evidence (when you justify, explain what ethical considerations should be taken into account when handling the situation described in the case study). Two academic sources are required for the consultation. Two to three academic sources are required for the consultation. Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required. You are required to submit the case study and the consultation to Turnitin. Refer to the directions in the Student Success Center. This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion. This assignment measures the following competency: Comp 4.1: Evaluate the connection between ethical communication and different worldviews. Download File
Educational Systems: Tacit Knowledge and Effective Cross-Cultural Communication.m4v
 
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NCSU international student community shares their unique experience about differences between the US and the educational systems within which they studied in their home countries.
Views: 722 OIS at NCSU
Intercultural Communication
 
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Credit: "Flipping the Bird." http://www.cracked.com/funny-290-flipping-bird/. Accessed on 3 November, 2011. "The Meaning of the Thumbs-up Hand Gesture Around the World." http://www.articlesbase.com/travel-tips-articles/the-meaning-of-the-thumbsup-hand-gesture-around-the-world-624721.html. Accessed on 3 November, 2011. Vietnam Travel Deals. http://www.vnviews.com/vietnam-travel-tips/howtopopular/How-to-popular.php. Accessed on 3 November, 2011. Kayleigh Rayburn
Views: 74 TheMolldog18
Communication at Work is Everything and Everything is Communication
 
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Communication in the workplace is everything, and EVERYTHING is communication. Humor at Work offers free articles and other resources at: www.HumoratWork.com
Views: 14584 Michael Kerr
UNIVERSITY OF ST. GALLEN, SWITZERLAND - ASIA COURSE PROMO
 
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The University of St. Gallen is offering a one week Asia compact master course at SGI in Singapore! This will run from 29 October until 4 November 2018. The course is about intercultural communication by Professor Daria Berg. Please register your interest by emailing [email protected] Course Contents: “When yes means no! (or yes or maybe)”, a book by Brahm (2003) on doing business in China, alerts us to the pitfalls of communication in an alien culture. In the era of globalisation, the need for intercultural communication competence is key to success in public, private and working life. How do we survive and succeed when we want to do business in East Asia? How do we communicate effectively within a different culture? How do we develop empathy within an alien cultural context? How do we cope with cultural differences? This course explores practical and theoretical approaches to intercultural communication competence. Multi-cultural Singapore servers as an example for approaches to intercultural competence. Using Singapore as a platform for fieldwork and total immersion in the East Asian cultural context, we shall investigate, explore and practise intercultural communication competence with a focus on Singapore, the Chinese world and global issues. Learning Goals: To foster intercultural awareness and communication skills, to examine, explore and practise intercultural communication competence, making use of Singapore as a case study and a platform for fieldwork. Course Structure: This course is taught as a block seminar within one week in Singapore during the Autumn Break 2018. Literature: An online reader will be available on Studynet by week 2. Additional Information: Prof. Dr. Daria Berg, DPhil (Oxon), is Chair Professor (Ordinaria) of Chinese Culture and Society at the University of St.Gallen. She has published extensively on Chinese literature, media and cultural history. Her monograph Women and the Literary World in Early Modern China, 1580‑1700 (2013) won the International Convention of Asia Scholars Book Prize 2015 Specialist Publication Accolade. Her joint article with Giorgio Strafella, ‘The Making of an Online Celebrity: A Critical Analysis of Han Han’s Blog’ (2015) was the 2015 Winner of ‘The Eduard B. Vermeer Prize for the Best Article’. Her current research explores urban culture in contemporary China, including the new digital media, literature, art, gender, audio‑visual culture and Internet culture.
Views: 2386 Shaira Yasmin Berg
Interculture for Development: Milton Bennett
 
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A new ingredient in the development effectiveness debate is intercultural competence – that is, the ability to overcome challenges posed by working with colleagues and partners from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. The aim is to turn diversity into an asset. - Read the full article at : http://capacity4dev.ec.europa.eu/article/bringing-intercultural-competence-development
Views: 1592 capacity4dev
What is INTERCULTURAL INTELLIGENCE? What does INTERCULTURAL INTELLIGENCE mean?
 
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What is INTERCULTURAL INTELLIGENCE? What does INTERCULTURAL INTELLIGENCE mean? INTERCULTURAL INTELLIGENCE definition - INTERCULTURAL INTELLIGENCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ ntercultural intelligence, or ICI, is a term that is used for the capability to function effectively in culturally diverse settings and consists of different dimensions (metacognitive, cognitive, motivational and behavioral) which are correlated to effectiveness in global environment (cultural judgement and decision making, cultural adaptation and task performance in culturally diverse settings). Intercultural intelligence differs from cultural intelligence in that it is based from the belief in interculturalism while CQ is based from the belief in multiculturalism. The term was first used in 2006 in response to the qualities observed in international executives that enabled them to succeed globally. In a culturally diverse society, his or her intercultural intelligence in used to expand on one’s understanding of the attitudes and knowledge base of one’s own culture as well as those of the dominant cultural groups within a society. In a global society, the demand for intercultural intelligence is increasing as the world become more global throughout the many different sectors of our lives. The theory of ICI disagrees with the assumptions of national cultures and instead suggest that there are individual “self-cultures” and corporate “self-cultures”. This can be seen today where an Indian is born and raised in Kuwait, their native tongue is English, and they work for a Korean company. Cross-cultural communication depends on much more than just language, culture plays a significant role. Language without ICI can lead to false cultural understanding and can actually become a disadvantage in communication. Understanding different worldviews have a significant impact on one's ICI. People with high ICI's have an adept understanding of the Honor and Shame, Guilt and Innocence, and Power and Fear worldviews. Intercultural sensitivity involves individuals ability to experience relevant cultural differences while intercultural intelligence involves the ability to interpret someone’s unfamiliar and ambiguous gestures. Intercultural intelligence is used in the business world in order to bridge the cultural divide and avoid misunderstandings that affect business. The application of ICI has been found to reduce the chances of clashes and other harmful incidences that usually affect productivity and feelings towards work. It's application is also found in business coaching as a way for cross-cultural coaching to be done in a way that overcomes miscommunication between different cultures. As businesses become more international, so do the interactions among their multi-cultural employees that are managed across cultural lines. ICI has been integrated into secondary and undergraduate schooling in the UAE. In the culturally diverse country of the Emirates, there have been implementation of courses that teach ICI in response for the voiced need of it in such an environment. It is starting to take notice that the current education system is done in a monocultural way while the world is becoming more multicultural. If students are more interculturally sensitive to members belonging to other cultures, this could aide in preventing ethnocentric attitudes. University and college faculties themselves are also going through the process of making their teacher more global through ICI. Dr Karen Magro states that teachers are finding that with the increasing diversity, the roles of teachers are widening to include the role of cultural guides and facilitators in the classroom.
Views: 112 The Audiopedia
Intercultural Communication- Kayleigh Rayburn
 
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Credit: "Flipping the Bird." http://www.cracked.com/funny-290-flipping-bird/. Accessed on 3 November, 2011. "The Meaning of the Thumbs-up Hand Gesture Around the World." http://www.articlesbase.com/travel-tips-articles/the-meaning-of-the-thumbsup-hand-gesture-around-the-world-624721.html. Accessed on 3 November, 2011. Vietnam Travel Deals. http://www.vnviews.com/vietnam-travel-tips/howtopopular/How-to-popular.php. Accessed on 3 November, 2011. Kayleigh Rayburn
Views: 68 BSUCOMM375Coker
Failed Communication : Misunderstanding in Intercultural Encounters - Part 1 of 4
 
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"Failed Communication : Misunderstanding in Intercultural Encounters" By Prof. Dr. Juliane House - Professor of Applied Linguistics at Hamburg University, Germany About the Speaker : Juliane House received her first degree in English, Spanish, translation and international law from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, her B Ed, MA and PhD in linguistics and applied linguistics from the University of Toronto, Canada, a Distinguished Scholar Award Language Learning, University of Ann Arbor, USA and an honorary doctorate from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. She is Professor emerita of Applied Linguistics at Hamburg University and a senior member of the German Science Foundation's Research Centre on Multilingualism, where she directs projects on translation and text optimization in multilingual business communication. She also directs a project on multilingualism and multiculturalism at university funded by the Volkswagen Foundation. Her research interests include contrastive pragmatics, discourse analysis, politeness theory, English as a lingua franca, intercultural communication, global business communication and translation theory and practice. She has published over 200 articles and books .Her publications include A Model for Translation Quality Assessment, Translation Quality Assessment: A Model Revisited, Interlingual and Intercultural Communication, Cross-Cultural Pragmatics, Misunderstanding in Social Life, Multilingual Communication, Translatory Action and Intercultural Communication, Translation, The Pragmatics of English Lingua Franca, Globalization, Discourse, Media. In a Critical Perspective.
Views: 5705 ADULibraryRef
Engagement is the Answer! Cross-Cultural Lessons in Life and Psychology | Laura Johnson | TEDxUM
 
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In a global, multicultural world, Dr. Laura R. Johnson claims that everyday interactions are cross-cultural and that positive engagement is the answer to a peaceful society. Laura shares tips for the viewer’s own cross-cultural journey by offering intriguing images and stories from her life and work in international psychology. From being mistaken for a dead person, to collaborating with traditional healers, and working with refugees, Laura illuminates the stunning bias in psychology and encourages us to connect, care and collaborate with others. Dr. Laura R. Johnson is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Mississippi where she mentors PhD students, teaches multicultural, environmental and clinical psychology, intercultural communication, human sexuality and study abroad in Tanzania. Laura’s research is transnational, spanning cultural, conservation and peace psychology with a focus on positive youth development and community participation. Laura received two US Fulbright grants and two National Geographic Conservation Trust grants for research with East African youth and an Institute of International Education grant to provide intercultural training to US students. She has published book chapters and journal articles in cultural competence, cultural issues in children, international students, youth development, ethnopolitical conflict, and environmental action. Laura was an international student in Kenya and Peace Corps volunteer in Papua New Guinea before completing a PhD at the University of Louisville. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 2764 TEDx Talks
Assignment 2: Question 1 Intercultural Communication : Exploring Stereotypes
 
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Intercultural Communication : Exploring Stereotypes References: Viknesh Jayapalen , 2007. The 'Typical' Malaysian Indian.Stereotyping and Prejudice. [online], Jan 2007, p.1-8 ,Available at : http://www.docstoc.com/docs/22495434/Stereotyping-and-Prejudice [Accessed: 23 May 2013]. Hafidzi Razali , 2012. Timely to End Our Negative Stereotypical Impressions. [online] Available at: http://myrumbles.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/timely-to-end-our-negative-stereotypical-impressions/ [Accessed: 23 May 2013]. Simon Templar, 2009. Salt, Pepper and a little Kicap (SPAnK): Indians... The Malaysian Pariahs. [online] Available at: http://saltpepperandalittlekicap.blogspot.com/2009/10/indians-malaysian-pariahs.html [Accessed: 23 May 2013]. Gregory Sawin , 2013. HOW STEREOTYPES INFLUENCE OPINIONS ABOUT INDIVIDUALS[Online] Available at: http://www.generalsemantics.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/articles/etc/48-2-sawin.pdf [ Accessed: 23 May 2013]
Views: 180 Ho Jingshing
Intercultural communication
 
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Intercultural communication is a form of communication that aims to share information across different cultures and social groups. It is used to describe the wide range of communication processes and problems that naturally appear within an organization or social context made up of individuals from different religious, social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds. Intercultural communication is sometimes used synonymously with cross-cultural communication. In this sense it seeks to understand how people from different countries and cultures act, communicate and perceive the world around them. Many people in intercultural business communication argue that culture determines how individuals encode messages, what medium they choose for transmitting them, and the way messages are interpreted. The European researcher Daniele Trevisani pointed out the semantic distinction between Intercultural and Cross-Cultural Communication should be clearly specified: Intercultural Communication properly refers to the study of the "interaction" between people from different cultures, while Cross-Cultural Communication specifically refers to the comparison of how people from different cultures communicate. In other words, Cross-Cultural Communication is a "static differential image" depicting differences in communication patterns across different cultures, while Intercultural Communication studies "dynamic interactional patterns", what happens when people from at least two different cultures meet and interact, and what "frames" are generated from this interaction, e.g. understanding vs. misunderstanding, agreement vs. disagreement, cultural adaptation vs. cultural isolation, emerging of "third cultures", conflict vs. cooperation, intercultural team cohesiveness vs. team misunderstandings, intercultural projects success vs. projects failure, emotional improvement vs. emotional deterioration, and any other relational outcome. In a broader sense, Intercultural communication encompasses cross-cultural communication, international communication, development communication, and intercultural communication's narrower referent, intercultural communication proper. With regard to intercultural communication proper, it studies situations where people from different cultural backgrounds interact. Aside from language, intercultural communication focuses on social attributes, thought patterns, and the cultures of different groups of people. It also involves understanding the different cultures, languages and customs of people from other countries. Intercultural communication plays a role in social sciences such as anthropology, cultural studies, linguistics, psychology and communication studies. Intercultural communication is also referred to as the base for international businesses. There are several cross-cultural service providers around who can assist with the development of intercultural communication skills. Research is a major part of the development of intercultural communication skills. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1173 Audiopedia
Importance of Objective work and Communication ( FPS General Article )
 
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Thanks for watching Wonders YT : http://www.youtube.com/user/DEWonderbread Mak : http://www.youtube.com/user/ProjectMak Twitter : https://twitter.com/CurseBissell Wonder : https://twitter.com/CurseWonder Black : https://twitter.com/CurseBlackk Mak : https://twitter.com/CurseMak
Views: 199 Samuel Bissell
A Journey to Intercultural Consciousness
 
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This video from the Ohio State Multicultural Center shows how the center's programs guide students on a journey from personal identity to intercultural consciousness. Ohio State students are assisted in answering the questions: Who Am I? Who Are You? and Who Are We? in the interest of taking part in global leadership and social justice. The MCC is a department of Student Life at The Ohio State University. Transcript for A Journey to Intercultural Consciousness Are YOU a Global Citizen? Will you be ready for the world when you leave Ohio State? Who Am I? Who Are You? Who Are We? Who Am I? Do you know who you are? How much are you defined from within vs. external perceptions? What helps you be able to really KNOW and be OPENLY who you are? What hinders you in this journey? Our journey to Who Am I is a lifelong process...but the more we can confidently know and articulate who we are, the more open we can be to really listening to others' journeys of personal identity. Who Are You? What do you learn from listening to someone else? How do you encourage someone else to open up to you? How well do you share a conversation with someone who is different from you? How comfortable are others sharing with you? Our journey to gaining others' trust in sharing with us is a process of building non-defensive communication skills, such as active listening and dialogue. Who Are We? What inspires you to take action on behalf of someone else? How important is it to you to have a hand in changing things for the better? Who are you in a community? Are you a global citizen? The Multicultural Center, a department of Student Life at Ohio State, has over 500 programs a year, all focused on teaching students the personal and interpersonal skills you need to be effective in a global community. (intercultural celebrations, awareness events, extra-curricular dialogues, student leadership groups, prejudice reduction trainings and intergroup dialogue courses) All MCC program are open to everyone. Check us out! Intercultural consciousness .... the capacity to engage in meaningful interdependent relationships with diverse others ....to comfortably and more effectively act as advocates or social justice allies across a range of social issues, from civil rights to causes related to specific social identities. -Patricia M. King, Marcia B. Baxter Magolda—A Developmental Model of Intercultural Maturity Journal of College Student Development, Volume 46, Number 6, November/December 2005, pp. 571-592 Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press DOI: 10.1353/csd.2005.0060
Views: 1691 TheMCCOSU
Part 1: Reflections on Decolonizing Intercultural Education - TJ class
 
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Colleague Toby Jenkins sent me questions from her students who read my article, Good Intentions Are Not Enough: Decolonizing Intercultural Education. Here I am answering their questions...
Views: 157 Paul Gorski
Communication: The Most Important Part of Language Learning
 
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Read the article: http://bit.ly/13LBqIz I talk about communication in the four languages that I know (at different levels), showing the importance of making a lot of mistakes!
Views: 1230 RealLife English
Part 2: Reflections on Decolonizing Intercultural Education - TJ class
 
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I'm answering questions regarding my 2008 article, Good Intentions Are Not Enough: Decolonizing Intercultural Education. This is the second part of a 2-part video.
Views: 64 Paul Gorski
(What Not to Do?)Intercultural communication in the Nurse-Client Relationship
 
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It was evident that a therapeutic relationship was lacking between the health care workers and the labouring mother from Nigeria. This was due to the lack of sensitivity on the part of the healthcare workers. The reason for the disconnect during the former part of the video was due to the emic perspective of the client versus the etic perspective of the nurse (video analysis article). Both the healthcare workers and the client had different cultural backgrounds along with a pronounced language barrier. The relationship between the labouring client from Nigeria, the Doctor and nurses did not illustrate a positive therapeutic connection because of the lack of intercultural communication. The Nigerian woman did not feel comfortable with the healthcare workers as they did not utilize any form of intercultural communication. This resulted in a disconnect between healthcare worker and client. Talk to the client and not the interpreter. Maintain eye contact as appropriate. Looking at the client directly reinforces that the communication is between the provider and the client, assisted by the interpreter. This also allows the provider to assess the non-verbal reactions and responses Non-verbal communication is useful in conveying and receiving information. Techniques such as demonstration, gestures, the use of pictures or symbols, and written translations of information are useful in communicating with the client. Observing non-verbal reactions, such as facial expression, body posturing and tone of voice, is useful in assessing the client. Creativity and commitment to client-focused care are the key attributes necessary to integrate cultural preferences into the plan of care. Leininger (1991) has identified three modes of action or approaches that can be used to guide nursing judgments. Talk to the client and not the interpreter. Maintain eye contact as appropriate. Looking at the client directly reinforces that the communication is between the provider and the client, assisted by the interpreter. This also allows the provider to assess the non-verbal reactions and responses. Restrictive body language, such as the crossing of arms, using a gruff voice, rolling the eyes and looking at a watch while talking to a client, gives a silent message that the nurse is not interested in the client. The Video did not follow the CNO guidelines in providing Culturally Sensitive Care Boundaries related to gender and privacy Communication norms The nurse is responsible for assessing and responding appropriately to the clients cultural expectations and needs Lack of privacy = lack of respect Inappropriate body language Client Centered Care?
Views: 71548 mikoyap
Failed Communication : Misunderstanding in Intercultural Encounters - Part 2 of 4
 
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"Failed Communication : Misunderstanding in Intercultural Encounters" By Prof. Dr. Juliane House - Professor of Applied Linguistics at Hamburg University, Germany About the Speaker : Juliane House received her first degree in English, Spanish, translation and international law from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, her B Ed, MA and PhD in linguistics and applied linguistics from the University of Toronto, Canada, a Distinguished Scholar Award Language Learning, University of Ann Arbor, USA and an honorary doctorate from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. She is Professor emerita of Applied Linguistics at Hamburg University and a senior member of the German Science Foundation's Research Centre on Multilingualism, where she directs projects on translation and text optimization in multilingual business communication. She also directs a project on multilingualism and multiculturalism at university funded by the Volkswagen Foundation. Her research interests include contrastive pragmatics, discourse analysis, politeness theory, English as a lingua franca, intercultural communication, global business communication and translation theory and practice. She has published over 200 articles and books .Her publications include A Model for Translation Quality Assessment, Translation Quality Assessment: A Model Revisited, Interlingual and Intercultural Communication, Cross-Cultural Pragmatics, Misunderstanding in Social Life, Multilingual Communication, Translatory Action and Intercultural Communication, Translation, The Pragmatics of English Lingua Franca, Globalization, Discourse, Media. In a Critical Perspective.
Views: 1003 ADULibraryRef
What is INTERCULTURAL SIMULATION? What does INTERCULTURAL SIMULATION mean?
 
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What is INTERCULTURAL SIMULATION? What does INTERCULTURAL SIMULATION mean? INTERCULTURAL SIMULATION meaning - INTERCULTURAL SIMULATION definition - INTERCULTURAL SIMULATION explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Intercultural simulation is an educational activity designed to provide constructive encounters between people of more than one cultural or ethnic group. Simulations designed for this purpose have been in use since the 1970s. Intercultural distinguishes itself from the term cross-cultural by asserting a contextually rich interpretative process which emphasizes interactions between and among culturally-diverse individuals. Conversely, cross-cultural communication is interested in studying how specific concepts, such as time or masculinity, are expressed and negotiated across cultures to provide a greater understanding of cultural comparison. It is therefore appropriate to apply the term intercultural to discussions of games and simulations precisely because of the conceptual emphasis on dynamic interactivity. Delving further into intercultural as a conceptual term, intercultural literacy refers to an individual’s ability to interact appropriately and effectively with members of other linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Further, intercultural competence suggests the ability of an individual to adapt verbal as well as nonverbal messages to various cultural contexts. Finally, intercultural communication refers to the exchange of verbal and nonverbal messages between two or more interlocutors from dissimilar cultures or co-cultures. It is important to define game and simulation. Viewing games as systems of interaction, playing is a form of contact by interaction given the central role of play within games. Prior to exploring specific differences between digital and non-digital games and simulations it is advisable to understand the simulation on a conceptual level. Simulations demand the use of rules. In the digital realm, simulations employ physical laws to allow for certain types of interaction. In non-digital simulation, rules are similarly necessary if only to provide parameters of behavior. In both cases, the simulation uses rules in order to affect how the individual is able to perform within its constraints. It is not necessary to win or lose: the emphasis inherent to any simulation is experience. Unlike games which position individuals in situations with opportunities to succeed or fail and whose outcomes determine the length of the game, simulations can actually persist without ending. In contrast to both terms, a simulation game is a delicate educational combination of both wherein experience is paramount to its design and appreciation but that the player/learner must gather points or credits or similar in order to proceed to further levels. Here the term "digital" generally refers to computer, game-console, or online based games or simulations. In contrast, "non-digital" refers to card games, board games, or other non-electronic games or simulations. Most recently virtual environments have attracted attention given their potential for increasing intercultural literacy among users. Similar to virtual worlds, virtual environments, which largely function as interactive collaborative and training spaces, can also exist as a computer-based simulated environment. Virtual environments often allow for custom-made training solutions which can be used to promote intercultural competence. Active Worlds and Second Life, both online virtual worlds, have been the focus of scholarly investigations as to whether individuals can gain intercultural literacy and competence from such immersive learning environments. Findings generally point to their potential for enabling culturally and linguistically diverse individuals to interact with one another in digital spaces.
Views: 35 The Audiopedia
Cultural Understanding
 
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Vodcasts are short videos that weave relevant topics and research-based content with interviews and authentic experiences caring for children. They can be used by individuals or in groups. To optimize their utility, check out the corresponding Discussion Starters and the Great Ideas article to use as a guide with the Vodcast. Better Kid Care hopes that you can spark ideas, share meaningful information, or meet professional development goals with these materials. Materials here: http://bit.ly/vodcasts Better Kid Care is always working to translate research-based information into online child care training. You can sign up to take an On Demand lesson now. It is free to learn, and only $5.00 fee/lesson to receive professional development hours. On Demand E-Learning: http://bit.ly/takealesson Subscribe to us and stay in touch! Website: http://extension.psu.edu/youth/betterkidcare Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1X5iPPM Twitter: https://twitter.com/BetterKidCare
Views: 11354 Better Kid Care
What is CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY? What does CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY mean?
 
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What is CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY? What does CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY mean? CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY meaning - CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY definition - CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Cross-cultural psychology is the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, including both their variability and invariance, under diverse cultural conditions. Through expanding research methodologies to recognize cultural variance in behavior, language, and meaning it seeks to extend and develop psychology. Since psychology as an academic discipline was developed largely in North America and Europe, some psychologists became concerned that constructs accepted as universal were not as invariant as previously assumed, especially since many attempts to replicate notable experiments in other cultures had varying success. Since there are questions as to whether theories dealing with central themes, such as affect, cognition, conceptions of the self, and issues such as psychopathology, anxiety, and depression, may lack external validity when "exported" to other cultural contexts, cross-cultural psychology re-examines them using methodologies designed to factor in cultural differences so as to account for cultural variance. Although some critics have pointed to methodological flaws in cross-cultural psychological research and claim that serious shortcomings in the theoretical and methodological bases used impede rather than help the scientific search for universal principles in psychology, cross-cultural psychologists are turning more to the study of how differences (variance) occur, rather than searching for universals in the style of physics or chemistry. While cross-cultural psychology represented only a minor area of psychology prior to WWII, it began to grow in importance during the 1960s. In 1971, the interdisciplinary Society for Cross-Cultural Research (SCCR) was founded, and in 1972 the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP) was established. Since then, this branch of psychology has continued to expand as there has been an increasing popularity of incorporating culture and diversity into studies of numerous psychological phenomena. Cross-cultural psychology is differentiated from cultural psychology, which refers to the branch of psychology that holds that human behavior is strongly influenced by cultural differences, meaning that psychological phenomena can only be compared with each other across cultures to a limited extent. In contrast, cross-cultural psychology includes a search for possible universals in behavior and mental processes. Cross-cultural psychology "can be thought of as a type research methodology, rather than an entirely separate field within psychology". In addition, cross-cultural psychology can be distinguished from international psychology which centers around the global expansion of psychology especially during recent decades. Nevertheless, cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, and international psychology are united by a common concern for expanding psychology into a universal discipline capable of understanding psychological phenomena across cultures and in a global context.
Views: 4306 The Audiopedia
communication style
 
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Produced by EFIL, the European Federation for Intercultural Learning, and made possible through grants from the Council of Europe, the Anna Lindh Foundation, and Marco Balich. See: http://efil.afs.org/efi_en/view/9547 for other parts of this video.
Views: 1067 EdResults
Movie on 2 19 17 at 11 11 PM
 
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script: Communication is something that each individual has to perform daily in different forms. Verbal communication remains the most common form of communication applied by people in their daily activities but culture becomes an impediment to this form of communication. Personal experiences as an individual from a different culture have revealed the difficulties created by cultural differences in verbal communication. I am going to talk about politeness and impoliteness which results from intercultural communication as a result of the context in which communication is presented. Many times individuals might feel offended by another person, yet the statement made might not have been meant to offend the other person. In my discussion in will focus on context dependency and impoliteness of verbal communication within intercultural communication. The discussion makes a review of approaches applied in defining impoliteness, context dependency aspect of communication that results in impoliteness and give my personal experiences of such aspects. Research summary Kecskes, (2017) presents a discussion on intercultural communication which is focused on the aspects of impoliteness and context dependency. The article note that much of the research conducted on politeness in communication has focused on cross-cultural communication with minimal focus on intercultural communication. Within the context of intercultural communication, the interlocutors have minimal shared knowledge and thus cannot rely any existing common ground in seeking to understand the context of communication. The research focused on assessing the context of language when the interlocutors involved are using a common language, which is not their first language. The purpose of developing such an assessment platform is to assess the different contexts in which people consider the context of the spoken words. Understanding the context of the spoken word becomes important as the authors seeks to explore the theories of politeness that can be applied in different settings. Politeness or impoliteness is understood form different perspectives across different cultures and the hence what might be polite to one individual might be seems as impolite or rude to another person (Kecskes, 2017). Impoliteness in the context of research thus can only be achieved through the evaluation of the self and the other. In the process of interactions, comments commonly seem to elicit more impoliteness than the interactions themselves and hence the purpose of the article focusing on the language. Expression commonly have different meanings to individuals from different cultural backgrounds. Context thus becomes an important factor affecting the way in which impoliteness occurs during communication. Within the intercultural context, politeness does not have to hold previous experiences as it is affected by the perceptions that people have. Research findings The article makes assessment of theories of politeness that can be applied in seeking to explain intercultural interactions. The research is based on the hypothesis that context of the language could affect the intercultural interactions differently from the case of communication in which the interlocutors are using their first language in communication. The article began by revisiting the issue of contest dependency of communication as the context in which communication takes place seems to have a deeper impact than just being the factors initiating the element of impoliteness. The meaning of the communication is defined by the context and there is need to determine the prior context and the actual context as communicated. Both types of context have different impacts on the communication and they affect the interpretations of the messages strongly. An example is the conversation between a Japanese student Akko (A) and American student Melody (M) A: Melody, I have received the travel grant. M: Nooou, get out of here! A: You should not be rude. I did get it. M: OK, I was not rude, just happy for you. In literal sense, the utterance “get out of here” means that as is supposed to be rude but the Japanese fails to understand the statement in the actual situation context in which it was spoken. The prior experience of an individual remains the only knowledge that they have and can easily result in a misguided understanding of a statement and subsequently become rude within the context in which they are spoken. The research finds that in many cases, intercultural interlocutors commonly rely on the prior experience and fail to consider the actual context of the situation in which the statement is made. The interpretation of a message thus becomes dependent on the utterances rather than the message being relayed within the context in which it is passed. Due to this nature of the interpretation, many people thus, fail to understand the message as communicated, thus becoming unaware of the impoliteness in the statement.
Views: 8 Haetham Sbeta
Human Rights and Intercultural Dialogue - Christoph Eberhard
 
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Alterity, complexity, interculturality and humanity. Four cultural disarmaments on the path of intercultural dialogue. Four ways to become aware and to go beyond our ethnocentrism. A path towards pluralism that avoids the pitfalls of oppressive universalism and the ghetto of particularisms. "The disillusions of universalist approaches as well as the clear need to go beyond relativist approaches provide fertile ground to take the challenges of pluralism - and of the related interculturalism - seriously. There is a felt need to organise living together in a responsible and culturally sensitive way. From a social science perspective, this entails understanding diverse normative organisations; from a legal perspective, this implies mapping out new ways to articulate them." Christoph Eberhard "Four landmarks delineate the pluralist horizon of living together necessary in order to emancipate human rights thought and practice in the intercultural dialogue from a universe familiar to us to a pluriverse that we are still struggling to understand: alterity, complexity, interculturality and humanity. They constitute four cultural disarmaments, four ways to become aware and go beyond our ethnocentrism. Walking the path outlined between these four poles will avoid the pitfalls of oppressive universalism or the ghetto of particularisms and may lead to a pluralist horizon of responsibility." Christoph Eberhard "Life is not a void to be filled. It is a plenitude to be discovered." Christoph Eberhard
Views: 2233 Dialogues for Change
Communication in the Latino community
 
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This videos was inspired when a group of friends and I looked through a Variety of articles and found one that specifically talked about the Latino population and their communications with their children when it comes to sexual topics. Parent-child communication has been strongly related to the Latino adolescent's attitudes towards sexual communication and behavior. In many studies, pregnant Latina teens reported less communication with theory parents than did non-pregnant teens. There is also research that tells us that Latino parents are less likely to talk to their teenagers about sexual topics than parents from other ethnic groups. Furthermore, in a small-scale study there was evidence of low rates of instances where sexual issues were talked about in Latino families. Therefore, we concluded that parent communication might be an important factor to consider when it comes to teen pregnancy in abusive sexual partners in the Latino community. we hope you pass this video along.
Views: 218 Frank Gomez
The Organizational Communication Research Center
 
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Dr. Bruce Berger from The University of Alabama demonstrates how The Organizational Communication Research Center provides practitioners with articles on best practices and measure in employee communication at the IPR Trustees Research Symposium on Nov. 8, 2012. To learn more visit the center here: http://www.instituteforpr.org/orgcomm/
Views: 252 Institute for PR
Lingyi Xiong, Wah!Banana YouTuber, on Digital Technology
 
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Lingyi Xiong, video producer and owner of the Wah!Banana YouTube channel, talks about the role of digital technology for her as a creator and as a means of cross-cultural communication. "Digital Creativity: Culture Reimagined" is the theme of World Intellectual Property Day 2016. Find out more about intellectual property and digital creativity at http://www.wipo.int/ipday. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 IGO License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/
Views: 3130 WIPO
Failed Communication : Misunderstanding in Intercultural Encounters - Part 3 of 4
 
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"Failed Communication : Misunderstanding in Intercultural Encounters" By Prof. Dr. Juliane House - Professor of Applied Linguistics at Hamburg University, Germany About the Speaker : Juliane House received her first degree in English, Spanish, translation and international law from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, her B Ed, MA and PhD in linguistics and applied linguistics from the University of Toronto, Canada, a Distinguished Scholar Award Language Learning, University of Ann Arbor, USA and an honorary doctorate from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. She is Professor emerita of Applied Linguistics at Hamburg University and a senior member of the German Science Foundation's Research Centre on Multilingualism, where she directs projects on translation and text optimization in multilingual business communication. She also directs a project on multilingualism and multiculturalism at university funded by the Volkswagen Foundation. Her research interests include contrastive pragmatics, discourse analysis, politeness theory, English as a lingua franca, intercultural communication, global business communication and translation theory and practice. She has published over 200 articles and books .Her publications include A Model for Translation Quality Assessment, Translation Quality Assessment: A Model Revisited, Interlingual and Intercultural Communication, Cross-Cultural Pragmatics, Misunderstanding in Social Life, Multilingual Communication, Translatory Action and Intercultural Communication, Translation, The Pragmatics of English Lingua Franca, Globalization, Discourse, Media. In a Critical Perspective.
Views: 417 ADULibraryRef
Intercultural Sensitivity in EAL Learning - Video 1
 
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Language and culture are informally integrated in many English as an Additional Language (EAL) programs, but cultural discussions are often regarded from the perspective of a particular dominant culture. Although this integration is crucial for the development of communicative competence, practical applications are still challenging as language teachers tend to know more about linguistic items than cultural aspects (Celce-Murcia, 2007). This article describes a digital literacy project implemented with language learners in an adult EAL program. Using Bennett’s (1993) DMIS model for intercultural sensitivity as a conceptual framework, the project was an invitation for international students and newcomers to Canada to explore and expand on their understanding of intercultural relationships while studying in a multicultural EAL class. The learners engaged in five steps to complete the project (reflective discussion, script writing, video recording scenes, editing, and final reflection) with a short movie serving as the digital product. The digital literacy project proposed is a potential tool for integrating intercultural sensitivity into EAL programs and engaging learners in discussions about diversity in cultural values, beliefs, and behaviours as a way to affirm their cultural identities. Thanks to all the dedicated students for giving permission to publish this video More video projects can be found at http://www.breakingtheinvisiblewall.com
Views: 524 Angelica Galante
What is CULTURAL TRANSLATION? What does CULTURAL TRANSLATION mean?
 
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What is CULTURAL TRANSLATION? What does CULTURAL TRANSLATION mean? CULTURAL TRANSLATION meaning - CULTURAL TRANSLATION definition - CULTURAL TRANSLATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cultural translation represents the practice of translation, which involves cultural differences. Cultural translation can be also defined as a practice whose aim is to present another culture via translation. This kind of translation solves some issues linked to culture, such as dialects, food or architecture. The main issue that cultural translation must solve consists in translating a text as showing cultural differences of this text, in respecting the source culture. Cultural translation is a term which must be also studied through cultural anthropology, a field of anthropology focused on cultural issues among humans. This discipline questions translation through cultural differences. Indeed, translation studies are not only based on language issues, but also on cultural contexts between peoples. An anthropological translator of cultures needs to deal with the issues between the source and the target language, that is to say he must respect at the same time the cultural source of point of view and the target culture. Wilhelm von Humboldt shared this opinion of translation in a letter addressed to A.W.Schlegel, dated July 23, 1796: “All translation seems to me simply an attempt to solve an impossible task. Every translator is doomed to be done in by one of two stumbling blocks: he will either stay too close to the original, at the cost of taste and the language of his nation, or he will adhere too closely to the characteristics peculiar to his nation, at the cost of the original. The medium between the two is not only difficult, but downright impossible” since “…despite the fact that translation brings cultures nearer, in each translation, there will be a definite deformation between cultures." Some anthropologists raise objections to translation of cultures. According to these researchers, culture seeks a certain coherence that can be found in people’s thinking and practices. In this case, a cultural translator must have a much more widespread knowledge than the text actually provides. Besides, translation of cultures cannot be as equal as it should be, as some cultures and societies remain dominant compared to others, therefore power is a limit to translation of cultures. Indeed, within a translation of cultures, the target language may dominate the source culture in order to make the text comprehensible in a sense of culture for the readers. The meaning of culture is quite difficult to understand, therefore translation of cultures is certainly limited, all the more so borders exist between cultures, which must be thus distinguished. This limit of translation of cultures was also explained in the theory of Edward Sapir, an American linguist and anthropologist : “The worlds in which different societies live are distinct worlds, not merely the same world with different labels attached”. “Each linguistic community has its own perception of the world, which differs from that of other linguistic communities, implies the existence of different worlds determined by language”. Some linguists assume that untranslatability doesn’t only come from linguistic limits but also from cultural barriers within translation. According to some linguists, such as C.L. Wren, differences of point of view between peoples relatively impose narrow limits to cultural translatability. The theory of universal translatability is therefore disapproved by some researchers, like André Martinet, who is convinced that human experience cannot be well communicated because it is unique. Catford rationalised this theory in his book "Linguistic Theory of Translation" : "Cultural untranslatability arises when a situational feature, functionally relevant for the source language text, is completely absent from the culture of which the TL is a part". For instance, the names of some institutions, clothes, foods and abstract concepts, amongst others." Anton Popovič also assumes that there is a difference between linguistic and cultural untranslatability, an idea that he defends in “A Dictionary for the Analysis of Literary Translation” : “A situation in which the linguistic elements of the original cannot be replaced adequately in structural, linear, functional or semantic terms in consequence of a lack of denotation or connotation”.-....
Views: 2999 The Audiopedia
Call of Culture Magazine Promo
 
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Call of Culture is an innovative international cultural dialogue program, developing standards and media for individuals around the globe to build bridges and advance communication utilizing social media and other media outlets. Call of Culture will launch a magazine on the World Peace Day featuring guides to and articles about cultures of different regions of the world with an underlying theme of cultural awareness. This peace building media/tool is designed to advance communication and understanding between people of different cultures.
Views: 5226 CallofCulture
What is CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE? What does CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE mean?
 
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What is CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE? What does CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE mean? CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE meaning - CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE definition - CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Cross-cultural competence refers to the knowledge, skills, and affect/motivation that enable individuals to adapt effectively in cross-cultural environments. Cross-cultural competence is defined here as an individual capability that contributes to intercultural effectiveness regardless of the particular intersection of cultures. Although some aspects of cognition, behavior, or affect may be particularly relevant in a specific country or region, evidence suggests that a core set of competencies enables adaptation to any culture (Hammer, 1987). Cross-cultural competence is not an end in itself, but is a set of variables that contribute to intercultural effectiveness. Whereas previous models have tended to emphasize subjective outcomes, by focusing primarily on adjustment, outcomes of interest here include both subjective and objective outcomes. Objective outcomes, such as job performance, have been addressed in previous research, but to a lesser degree than the subjective outcomes. Research indicates that the outcomes are linked, with personal and interpersonal adjustment linked to work adjustment, which has in turn been linked with job performance (Shay & Baack, 2006). However, these relationships are small, and some research has demonstrated that subjective outcomes can diverge from objective outcomes (Kealey, 1989), with expatriates sometimes showing relatively poor adjustment but high effectiveness in their organizational role.
Views: 281 The Audiopedia

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